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ichadwick
06-12-2011, 05:27 AM
Picked up a container of hemp oil at the local farmers' market yesterday. Tried it on a couple of ukes - soaked right into the fretboards and bridge. Tends to sit on the finished wood, and takes some rubbing to clean off. But it seems good for wood and it's a natural oil product. I tried it on some furniture too. Aside from the somewhat strong hemp scent, it strikes me as a nice wood oil.

Laouik
06-12-2011, 05:35 AM
I was told to never use Lemon Oil, but rather natural heavy oils like linseed oil for the fretboard...

pithaya9
06-12-2011, 05:52 AM
Never thought to use hemp seed oil, thanks Ian. It should work just fine on fretboards. :2cents:

Gmoney
06-12-2011, 06:10 AM
Interesting tip - will have to look for some But I'm surprised that you haven't found a source for "Agave oil"! There MUST be some way to apply a bit of the Tequila mojo other than liberal application to the ukulele-ee!!

Mahalo!

pithaya9
06-12-2011, 07:43 AM
Interesting tip - will have to look for some But I'm surprised that you haven't found a source for "Agave oil"! There MUST be some way to apply a bit of the Tequila mojo other than liberal application to the ukulele-ee!!

Mahalo!

I'm up for that!

Rick Turner
06-12-2011, 09:05 AM
Oils used on wooden musical instruments fall into two broad categories: Drying oils like linseed, tung, spike (a kind of lavender oil), and walnut, and non-drying oils like grape seed, mineral oil (which covers most "lemon oil" products, etc.

Most people use non-drying oils to liven up the look of dried out unfinished wood...usually just fingerboards and bridges on ukes. These oils will penetrate a bit, and then slowly evaporate at which point you will want to re-oil.

You can use the drying type of oils (which are traditionally the main ingredients of oil varnishes) as long as you are careful not to let it sit up on the surface of the wood where it will cure into a kind of sticky film, on it's way to being a kind of soft varnish.

One of the advantages of regular maintenance of the bare wood, particularly with fingerboards and bridges, is that while sweat contains acids which will slowly degrade wood, the oils can provide a barrier against the acids. Many people proudly proclaim that they do nothing to the wood, forgetting this slow acid attack. Others claim that oiling regularly "feeds the wood", when in fact the wood is dead. Oiling does protect the wood, and it just makes it look nice.

Pippin
06-12-2011, 09:35 AM
Oiling does protect the wood, and it just makes it look nice.

I used to use it to clean old gun stocks (muzzle-loaders). Yep, works wonders and does protect the wood a good bit. It also gets the grime loose from a caked up frizzen and pan.

shrink9
06-12-2011, 09:39 AM
So if I want some good quality hemp oil, do I need to grow it myself? hmmmmm lol!!!

ichadwick
06-12-2011, 11:36 AM
Interesting tip - will have to look for some But I'm surprised that you haven't found a source for "Agave oil"! There MUST be some way to apply a bit of the Tequila mojo other than liberal application to the ukulele-ee!!

Mahalo!
It's best when taken internally.... ;-)

ichadwick
06-12-2011, 11:45 AM
A little research told me this:
Hemp seed oil contains 53%-60% of linoleic acid (LA and LNA), making it a rich source of omega fatty acids.
Which means it's edible. But this part was of greater interest:
Hemp oil extract is a perfect ingredient for anything that has an oil base, including non-toxic, environmentally friendly paints, varnishes and inks. Hemp oil is water resistant and when applied to wood as a varnish or paint, it soaks deeply into the wood grain. This protects the wood, rendering it water resistant as well. Hemp paint was enormously popular with artists in the past, including Rembrandt, Thomas Gainsborough and Vincent Van Gogh, who all used hemp paint, canvases, solvents, cleaners and lubricating oils.
This site has some interesting data on wood oils:
greenwood-carving.blogspot.com/2009/12/what-is-best-oil-for-treating-wood.html (http://greenwood-carving.blogspot.com/2009/12/what-is-best-oil-for-treating-wood.html) where one poster comments on hemp oil:
It has a similar drying value to walnut oil and does not yellow. I can't compare the two; hempseed oil worked so well for me it has been the only oil I have used for finishing.
And www.treehugger.com/files/2006/07/hempwood_all_na.php (http://www.treehugger.com/files/2006/07/hempwood_all_na.php) notes:
"It provides a relatively clear coating which enriches and protects wood grains. The product has produced excellent results when applied to exterior walls and decks, furniture, antiques, interior floors... even canoes, paddles and as a clear lacquer on metal and painted surfaces. Its said to be safe for cutting boards and would you believe it salad bowls!"

PhilUSAFRet
06-12-2011, 12:06 PM
Hope there aren't any drug sniffer dogs come around where you are playing! LOL

ichadwick
06-13-2011, 12:54 AM
I was told to never use Lemon Oil, but rather natural heavy oils like linseed oil for the fretboard...
Lemon oil is okay but it's a cleaner as well, and some brands can actually dry out the wood. Some companies have other additives in the oil - detergents that make it stronger, so in general it's best not to use grocery-store brands on unfinished wood. There are brands that as designed for unfinished wood, but are usually found in furniture or hardware stores.

There are several guitar companies that make a lemon oil cleaner for instruments, but some are just for the body. Dunlop has a separate lemon oil for the fretboard. See www.theguitarcolumn.com/2010/02/dunlop-fretboard-65-ultimate-lemon-oil.html (http://www.theguitarcolumn.com/2010/02/dunlop-fretboard-65-ultimate-lemon-oil.html). I've used it and it works fine.

However, after a few tests, I'm leaning towards hemp oil as the best all-purpose wood oil, and it may replace my old standard, teak oil, as my favourite fretboard oil. Sure soaks in well.

ichadwick
06-13-2011, 12:55 AM
Hope there aren't any drug sniffer dogs come around where you are playing! LOL
Nah. While it's got a strong vegetal odour when applied, it disappears after a day or two. Hemp has all the THC removed so you could smoke it until you passed out and not get high. I have other hemp products, just never tried the oils before.

Laouik
06-13-2011, 03:05 AM
Lemon oil is okay but it's a cleaner as well, and some brands can actually dry out the wood. Some companies have other additives in the oil - detergents that make it stronger, so in general it's best not to use grocery-store brands on unfinished wood. There are brands that as designed for unfinished wood, but are usually found in furniture or hardware stores.

There are several guitar companies that make a lemon oil cleaner for instruments, but some are just for the body. Dunlop has a separate lemon oil for the fretboard. See www.theguitarcolumn.com/2010/02/dunlop-fretboard-65-ultimate-lemon-oil.html (http://www.theguitarcolumn.com/2010/02/dunlop-fretboard-65-ultimate-lemon-oil.html). I've used it and it works fine.

However, after a few tests, I'm leaning towards hemp oil as the best all-purpose wood oil, and it may replace my old standard, teak oil, as my favourite fretboard oil. Sure soaks in well.

It was explained to me that being a petroleum product, lemon oil penetrates and can, long-term, caused frets to separate or dislodge. Any petroleum-based product should be avoided... I understand many people swear by lemon oil, and have used it for yonks, I'm simply going by what the person who built my instrument told me. Whatever he says, I'll do. Since he has a lifetime warranty on it, I don't want to piss him off!

olgoat52
06-13-2011, 05:42 AM
It was explained to me that being a petroleum product, lemon oil penetrates and can, long-term, caused frets to separate or dislodge. Any petroleum-based product should be avoided... I understand many people swear by lemon oil, and have used it for yonks, I'm simply going by what the person who built my instrument told me. Whatever he says, I'll do. Since he has a lifetime warranty on it, I don't want to piss him off!

His lifetime or yours? ;)

Laouik
06-13-2011, 05:57 AM
His lifetime or yours? ;)

Whichever occurs first, I should think.
Man, never thought I'd learn so much so quickly. When he welcomed me in his workshop he covered -everything- he could think of that he thought I could benefit from.

Gillian
06-13-2011, 06:06 AM
Joe Souza of Kanile'a told me to use a 50/50 mix of lemon oil and boiled linseed oil on the bridge and fretboard.The lemon oil cleans off any grime and the linseed oil moisturizes the wood.

This hemp oil sounds interesting, though.