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haolejohn
06-14-2011, 06:22 PM
so tonight the SEUkers had a pretty awesome java jam. Had 20 or so ukers showed up and even had a semi-local luthier show up as well. It was a good night of ukeing and the opportunity to try many different ukes. I look forward to java jams b/c of the diversity of the ukes that show up. Got to play three new ukes that i have never played before. Two were made by local luthiers. One from Sewanee, Tn (2 1/2 hour drive) and one from the metro atl (gourd ukes) These two ukes sounded great. Especially the Sewanee, Tn guys. I will find the name and post some info later. I just don't remember what his ukes name was. But on to the snobbery question.

I also got to play one of the les paul ukes. Not going to lie. It sounded like complete crap. It was so quiet and tinky sounded that I wanted to throw it down but I knew that it wouldn't break b/c the thing is so sturdy, it would be my choice to kill zombies with. The top was the thickest top i have ever seen and it's weight was so much, I found my self looking for a strap. I know there are some here that like that piece of junk but for $100 I expect a lot more. Am I a uke snob? Am I going against the norm for a uke player (everything is supposed to be OK and happy)? Please enlighten me.

Skitzic
06-14-2011, 06:26 PM
I think once you've played all the big K brands like you have, the others all pale in comparison.

Snob? No. You just like what you like. :)

Doc_J
06-14-2011, 06:30 PM
Nope. You're not a snob. You call 'em as you see 'em.

I would be worse to say it sounded 'OK', if you really hated it.

My guess people that like it, like it for it's looks/image not because it sounds great.

bbycrts
06-14-2011, 06:32 PM
You know what appeals to you, John. Nothing wrong with that. Of course...the Les Paul appeals to others and there's nothing wrong with that, either!

I wouldn't expect it to be the best sounding acoustic instrument - aren't they really gearing it toward people who want to plug it in?

Hippie Dribble
06-14-2011, 06:37 PM
It's as important to know what you like as what youd don't like. They go together. I don't consider myself a uke snob. I play a $25 uke regularly as well as an $1300 uke regularly. Love em both.

That said, I wouldn't consider buying one of those les paul ukes either. but nor would i consider buying a lanikai, kala etc factory uke for playing. I have tried a massive range of ukes over the last 4 years and now have narrowed down my real 'loves' to only 3 or 4 makers. I know what i like and would opt for them everytime. You buy what you like the sound of and what you can afford. Simple as that.

I do love listening to people playing ukes of any and every kind, doesn't mean I'd buy em all for myself though.

janeray1940
06-14-2011, 06:37 PM
I think once you've played all the big K brands like you have, the others all pale in comparison.

Snob? No. You just like what you like. :)

I agree completely with both of these statements.

But then, I'm probably a uke snob myself :)

haolejohn
06-14-2011, 06:59 PM
I was interested in getting one until tonight. It sounded so bad, I wouldn't even care how it sounded plugged in. I just read a lot of likes about it here on UU so I picked up with high expectations. I mean i was bouncey waiting to try it out.
Of course it had factory strings and the action was crazy high but the sound was :( and it could have been just that one uke. Maybe my expectations were too high (It is all Tudorp's fault:))

SweetWaterBlue
06-14-2011, 07:03 PM
Well, I will stick up for it. As another poster said, it was really geared towards being plugged in - not being played acoustically. It had a nice clean tone, as most heavy overbuilt electrically geared ukes do. It reminded me a lot of the Cordoba electric/acoustic I owned for a few weeks - built like a tank and great sounding when plugged in, but dead otherwise. The guy who brought it is coming to us from the guitar world, and for him it represented a good bridge from guitar to uke. I think he said he paid $100 for it new, so naturally it doesn't sound like a Koaloha. I told him it could probably benefit from a set of Aquilas to replace the strings of unknown parentage on it. Could he have gotten a better acoustic uke for the price - probably, but for his purposes it was just fine, and he is rightfully very proud of it. It was also very pretty in a guitar sort of way.

I'm guessing that if you picked up a really good electric guitar and played it unplugged, you would think it sounded like crap too, but plug it in and it will sing if you know how to play it. I bet a lot of classic electric guitar songs would sound like crap played on an unplugged Koaloha - at least to a metal head.

haolejohn
06-14-2011, 07:07 PM
Well, I will stick up for it. As another poster said, it was really geared towards being plugged in - not being played acoustically. It had a nice clean tone, as most heavy overbuilt electrically geared ukes do. It reminded me a lot of the Cordoba electric/acoustic I owned for a few weeks - built like a tank and great sounding when plugged in, but dead otherwise. The guy who brought it is coming to us from the guitar world, and for him it represented a good bridge from guitar to uke. I think he said he paid $100 for it new, so naturally it doesn't sound like a Koaloha. Could he have gotten a better acoustic uke for the price - probably, but for his purposes it was just fine, and he is rightfully very proud of it.

i know he was proud of it and he got it b/c his favorite guitar was a les paul. I like les pauls and it did remind me of a LP b/c of the weight but as a uke it didn't impress me at all. Maybe I should try and plug it in before I cast it aside, but I know I would rather spend the little extra dough and get a eleuke.

It just reminded me too much of a novelty uke.

haolejohn
06-14-2011, 07:13 PM
Well, I will stick up for it. As another poster said, it was really geared towards being plugged in - not being played acoustically. It had a nice clean tone, as most heavy overbuilt electrically geared ukes do. It reminded me a lot of the Cordoba electric/acoustic I owned for a few weeks - built like a tank and great sounding when plugged in, but dead otherwise. The guy who brought it is coming to us from the guitar world, and for him it represented a good bridge from guitar to uke. I think he said he paid $100 for it new, so naturally it doesn't sound like a Koaloha. I told him it could probably benefit from a set of Aquilas to replace the strings of unknown parentage on it. Could he have gotten a better acoustic uke for the price - probably, but for his purposes it was just fine, and he is rightfully very proud of it. It was also very pretty in a guitar sort of way.

I'm guessing that if you picked up a really good electric guitar and played it unplugged, you would think it sounded like crap too, but plug it in and it will sing if you know how to play it. I bet a lot of classic electric guitar songs would sound like crap played on an unplugged Koaloha - at least to a metal head.

I also recommended a string change and a saddle adjustment. I know Tudorp did a lot of work onhis and became very pleased with it.

He also told me he was looking for a cheap amp to go with it. OK. Larry, you make me feel bad for being unuker like. I need to be more open to the lesser ukes out there.

SweetWaterBlue
06-14-2011, 07:17 PM
Well, I will stick up for it. As another poster said, it was really geared towards being plugged in - not being played acoustically. It had a nice clean tone, as most heavy overbuilt electrically geared ukes do. It reminded me a lot of the Cordoba electric/acoustic I owned for a few weeks - built like a tank and great sounding when plugged in, but dead otherwise. The guy who brought it is coming to us from the guitar world, and for him it represented a good bridge from guitar to uke. I think he said he paid $100 for it new, so naturally it doesn't sound like a Koaloha. Could he have gotten a better acoustic uke for the price - probably, but for his purposes it was just fine, and he is rightfully very proud of it.

haolejohn
06-14-2011, 07:20 PM
Well, I will stick up for it. As another poster said, it was really geared towards being plugged in - not being played acoustically. It had a nice clean tone, as most heavy overbuilt electrically geared ukes do. It reminded me a lot of the Cordoba electric/acoustic I owned for a few weeks - built like a tank and great sounding when plugged in, but dead otherwise. The guy who brought it is coming to us from the guitar world, and for him it represented a good bridge from guitar to uke. I think he said he paid $100 for it new, so naturally it doesn't sound like a Koaloha. I told him it could probably benefit from a set of Aquilas to replace the strings of unknown parentage on it. Could he have gotten a better acoustic uke for the price - probably, but for his purposes it was just fine, and he is rightfully very proud of it. It was also very pretty in a guitar sort of way.

I'm guessing that if you picked up a really good electric guitar and played it unplugged, you would think it sounded like crap too, but plug it in and it will sing if you know how to play it. I bet a lot of classic electric guitar songs would sound like crap played on an unplugged Koaloha - at least to a metal head.

perhaps but an electric/acoustic instrument should sound good either plugged or unplugged. I could understand this argument if it was a solid body uke (which it should be).

SweetWaterBlue
06-14-2011, 07:22 PM
perhaps but an electric/acoustic instrument should sound good either plugged or unplugged. I could understand this argument if it was a solid body uke (which it should be).

Well, judging from the thickness of the top, it practically was !

haolejohn
06-14-2011, 07:27 PM
Well, judging from the thickness of the top, it practically was !

LOL!! I do wish I had an amp to plug it in. I know that is what it is designed for and to get guitar players to buy one for that sentimental value effect:)

Dan Uke
06-14-2011, 08:08 PM
Ukesnob? No...everything is personal preference...I've read on this post that some people would never buy a Koaloha because they don't like the headstock.

SailingUke
06-14-2011, 08:16 PM
I would not call myself a uke snob, but I have learned to appreciate a fine instrument.
I believe we get spoiled, there is a reason some ukes are $100 and some are $2500.
I just played an aNueNue long neck soprano that is awesome and it is only $250, I love it and it is sweet, but it is not replacing my DaSilva.

mr moonlight
06-14-2011, 09:19 PM
I admit it. I'm a snob. Once you start playing high quality professional level instruments it can sometimes be really hard to play those of lesser quality. Not because there's something wrong with them, it's more of that there's not something right if that makes any sense. Of course price has little to do with being a high quality or professional level instrument. I have a Danelectro that cost me around $300 that stands up to pro level use.

iDavid
06-14-2011, 09:22 PM
Crap is crap and a snob is a snob

We need more uke snobs around. Crap ukes are what gave the uke a bad name and forced it into hiding. Are you a snob? yep! It doesn't have to be a K-brand to be great. Look at Mainland and Ohana.... Kala... the list goes on.

The Makala Dolphin is a pretty nice uke, for little money. We have four in my house and they sit proudly next to my K-Brand and Compass Rose.

My Name is David and I am a uke snob.... and I have no intensions of recovering.

Kekani
06-14-2011, 09:42 PM
. . . I know there are some here that like that piece of junk but for $100 I expect a lot more. Am I a uke snob?

If you are expecting a lot for $100, I wouldn't call you a snob - I'd call you something else.

One definition of a snob would be someone who says, "Here is my Custom `Ukulele that I paid ($2K+) for, and since I've had it (built specifically for me), its very difficult for me to pickup anyone else's instrument because this one is made how I wanted, plays like I want it to, and sounds like I want it to." Of course, being an `Ukulele player, yes, you should at least admit to when other instruments sound and play well (like you were used to before you got your custom), and if you don't have anything nice to say, just say, "I have a preference . . . ". Then at least you're a nice, politically correct snob, instead of venturing into what some may take as an offense (probably rightfully so).

We need more snobs.

webby
06-14-2011, 09:48 PM
In some ways I'm actually glad I haven't played a uke worth 3 grand and over, in fact the most expensive ive played was around 500 bucks.

The reason is, I know I'd want one, and wouldn't be happy with anything less, it happened to me with guitars, and I would rather just concentrate on learning to play really well on an acceptable 300 dollar uke for the time being anyway, then if I do get really really good i can then reward myself with a top quality instrument, its just a personal thing, but like I said, I got so caught up in the "must have a perfect guitar" saga for 20 years my playing suffered as I blamed my crappy instrument and not my lack of commitment to practice seriously as the reason I was not very good.

So keep those bloody K ukes away from me, I can't afford one, financialy or emotionaly.

ItsAMeCasey
06-14-2011, 09:52 PM
I don't think there's anything wrong with not liking the way that someones relatively inexpensive instrument sounds O.o. If that makes you a uke snob I guess that makes two.

Kekani
06-14-2011, 10:54 PM
Light bulb - start another thread: You know you're an `ukulele snob when. . .

You spell and pronounce `ukulele correctly, all the time (and if you dare shorten it, you pronounce it "ook").

You roll your eyes and bite your tongue (and not comment) when you see posts such as , "Install Aquila's on your Oscar Schmidt whatever and it'll really bring out the sound," all the while thinking, "Man, that thing is going to sound just as bad as a banjo. . ."

Okay, back to the thread - sorry guys, had a late dinner and I'm all amped up. . .

Tudorp
06-15-2011, 01:54 AM
Ok, I'll chime in since I was blamed for high expectations, hahhah..

It is what it is. And I also think it is more of a novelty uke. I said several times it isn't a "main player". And it sounded very dull unplugged. And it needed allot of work out of the box. It will never be a compeditor to the K brands. I like it, because it says "Les Paul" on it, because I am a Les Paul snob. It isn't a Les Paul to "Les Paul" standards really, but, it is fun to play plugged in. I never played an electric uke, so I would imagine any electric on can be fun to play running it through pedals and effects and things. I think Epi should have just not put a sound hole in it, and made it totally electric dependent, but that sound hole just doesn't do it. I had to do pretty extensive work on mine, and now Kurt's to get them to be "passable" unplugged. they are thick and heavy, and sound like it unplugged. But, I still like it, and play it when I want to goof around. But, I play my acoustics mainly. ;)

Laouik
06-15-2011, 03:10 AM
Now that I've experienced different levels of quality, I'd never buy a $100 uke unless it was for travel purposes only. And even then. I don't care what name they put on it. You get what you pay for. And you don't really "get" much until you drop at least $200-$250. I fully understand some don't have the budget for it, but that's neither here nor there. We're talking about instruments. Carefully crafted musical instruments that are designed, constructed and finished to create beautiful sound.

Yes, yes, yes you can get a decent mass-produced uke made in some dungeon for $100 that, I'm sure, sounds like a $900 Kamaka or $1400 Kanile'a to you. And you're all going to throw names at me and tell me I'm evil and make babies cry, blahblahblah. *rubs my LFdM* My precious...

fumanshu
06-15-2011, 03:50 AM
Well, I'm not considered myself as a uke snob in the sense that I don't really mind what ukes other people play and if they can make it sing good, well that's good for them. But as for me, I would not want to play with a uke that sound like a toy....and like other said, it's the kind of thing that make uke is not well considered sometimes.

The other thing is for a lot of players, if you haven't try a high end uke, you just don't know how good an uke can sound...But once you put your hands on a high end uke built by a good luthier, then you start to realize what you are missing playing with a 200$ uke...

And even there, you might have ukes that you thought that very good until you try something else that really blows you away....but again you have to have something to compare too and play back and forth...

And it's what happened to me. I've owned a bunch of nice ukes such as Koaloha, Kanile'a, custom Pahu Kani, custom MP, custom Little River etc...and thought that they sound good etc....until I acquired that Luis Feu de Mesquita uke, that really blows my mind and make me realize that what I actually had in my colection was very so so uke even if I always thought that they we're good!!!

And again, maybe one day, I'll find something even better that my Luis Feu de Mesquita custom but I think I might take some really long time since I'm not sure that I'll find any other better soon...

At the end, it's up to each people and their priority, if you're feeling good and happy with your instrument that cost 200$, well it's all good. And if you're picky about sound and playability, etc....well it's your rights too....

I always say that learning an instrument is already hard, why don't you help your self and get a decent one!

One other thing, is you will never performers such as Jake, James Hill, Herb Ohta jr, Britni, etc... playing with a 200$ in their show if not just for fun...but when they really want to perform, they will have their high end ukes!!! Wonder why!!

Laouik
06-15-2011, 04:45 AM
And it's what happened to me. I've owned a bunch of nice ukes such as Koaloha, Kanile'a, custom Pahu Kani, custom MP, custom Little River etc...and thought that they sound good etc....until I acquired that Luis Feu de Mesquita uke, that really blows my mind and make me realize that what I actually had in my colection was very so so uke even if I always thought that they we're good!!!

Where is your review?!?! Video?!?!
:p

SweetWaterBlue
06-15-2011, 04:51 AM
I think it is a mistake to assume that a lot of players that play those plebian less than $200 ukes don't know what a $1000 uke sounds like. I think it is more of a what is it worth to them sort of thing. I have played most of the K brand ukes, as well as LoPrinzi and several other high-end ukes. Some sound a bit better than my lowly Ohana SK35, but not hundreds of dollars better (to me). Perhaps I just have crappy ears, because my Ohana doesn't sound like a toy to me, even though I only paid around $130 for it used, with a case. I guess I feel about the same way about my Lanikai ST, even though it was a sub-$100 demo. I'm starting to think I must be a Neanderthal, since I have also drank $500+ bottles of wine but didn't think they tasted better than the stuff they sell for $12.

Uke Republic
06-15-2011, 05:17 AM
Snobs...:) Bottom line what you enjoy playing and what is fun. Ukes are priced really well in comparison to guitars that you can enjoy a variety of ukes.
Different ukes for different situations too.

hoosierhiver
06-15-2011, 05:26 AM
Not a snob, conisour maybe..

I've played some cheap-o ukes that sounded pretty good and were definitely enjoyable and I've played some more expensive ukes that were such duds they seemed to drain your energy.

haolejohn
06-15-2011, 05:27 AM
I think it is a mistake to assume that a lot of players that play those plebian less than $200 ukes don't know what a $1000 uke sounds like. I think it is more of a what is it worth to them sort of thing. I have played most of the K brand ukes, as well as LoPrinzi and several other high-end ukes. Some sound a bit better than my lowly Ohana SK35, but not hundreds of dollars better (to me). Perhaps I just have crappy ears, because my Ohana doesn't sound like a toy to me, even though I only paid around $130 for it used, with a case. I guess I feel about the same way about my Lanikai ST, even though it was a sub-$100 demo. I'm starting to think I must be a Neanderthal, since I have also drank $500+ bottles of wine but didn't think they tasted better than the stuff they sell for $12.
Larry I'm with you. My mainland sounds as good as my mele and it doesn't sound $500 worse than my koaloha.
In fairness to the LP, I would like to hear it plugged in. I thing they should fill it in and turn it into a solid body.

SweetWaterBlue
06-15-2011, 05:33 AM
Not a snob, conisour maybe..

I've played some cheap-o ukes that sounded pretty good and were definitely enjoyable and I've played some more expensive ukes that were such duds they seemed to drain your energy.

A much better definition, I think Mike. I think you have found the word - connoisseur. There are undoubtedly uke snobs, but I think HaoleJohn is a connoisseur, because he gets great enjoyment out of his fine ukes, but I have also seen him take up a lot of time helping newer converts with $50 ukes, and we all have fun together. A snob would turn up his nose and keep walking.

SailingUke
06-15-2011, 05:49 AM
I believe what is really important is that we play ukulele and HAVE FUN.
Whether we play a $10 or $2500 uke is not the point. WE PLAY !!!
There are not many things more fun to me than getting together with friends and playing and singing.
Our only measure is enjoyment. Whether you play well, sing on time and key, how expensive your ukulele is, has no bearing.
Some of us are fortunate enough to afford better ukes, but any uke can bring joy and share music.

strumsilly
06-15-2011, 08:22 AM
Ya usually get whats ya pay for. but I think the law of diminishing returns kicks in. a $3000 ukulele probably sounds better [and I hope looks better] than a $300 one, but probably not 10x better. then, I've never played a $3000 one, so what do I know.

Tudorp
06-15-2011, 08:37 AM
I think cost vs value all depends 100% on what you are looking for. I play my SK35 (Less than $200) and love it. I have the ones I paid a bit more for from the builder that supplies the ones I sell (Under $300). They tend to be a bit better than the Ohana for the most part, but pretty much comparible. I never played a 4 figure priced one, so I can't compare. I have no desire to spend that much on one. If I was a profesional musician, maybe. But, I am not into it for that. I am into it to have fun, and make fun music and experiances for myself as well as whoever listens. If I can do that with a $50 uke, I got great value for the money. If it takes a $1000 uke to ahcieve that, I need to spend that money. For me, it has to be MORE than just a pride thing to say I own/play a $1000 uke. I didn't buy my Epi LP to be my main uke. I bought it more as a novilty. I did expect a little bit more, but not much, for the $100. It is a $100 uke and I would be more disapointed if I paid $200 or up for it. It is pretty much what I expected. I was pleased to figure out that it can be a pretty good play with some work, so it works for what it is. I would love to have one of the K brands someday, but for nothing else than to say I have one, and IMHO that is the wrong reason, and I guess the main reason I haven't tried to pursue one. I will someday I imagine though..

All that said. It is just not fair, or even right to compare a chevy chevette to a Porche either... ;)

To add to that, and at the risk of sounding like a Miss USA canadate (but it is how I feel) If I had $1000 to spend on a uke for me, I would rather spend that same money and buy 20 cheap ukes and supply a classroom of kids their 1st uke.. Just sayin.. ;)

molokinirum
06-15-2011, 08:50 AM
No you are not a uke snob...

"It is, what it is"!!!!!

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
06-15-2011, 08:57 AM
Great thread. So many positive vibes here. Here's my two cents:

I feel like I'm not a ukulele snob as long as I give each ukulele I pick up a chance to charm me with its sound and spirit. Of course, that doesn't mean every ukulele I play will charm me. I've been charmed by ukuleles in every price bracket, both new and used.

I did once develop some bias against one manufacturer. Soon thereafter, I played one of their ukes that sounded and felt terrific. I learned not to judge a ukulele by anything other than sound and feel. (Welp, here in the forums I can't play the ukes I see; so looks certainly matter, too. btw, y'all have some nice-looking ukuleles!)

Of course, I don't assume that anyone else's taste in ukes has anything to do with my own. What sounds "thin" to me might sound "bright" to you. My "deep" might be your "dull". As long as your uke is sounding good to you, I'll think you've got a wonderful ukulele.

Keep having fun, everyone!!

Pippin
06-15-2011, 09:31 AM
I have had a lot of ukuleles in my hands. I have played some very fine custom-luthier-built models, too. I have four-figure ukes in my collection and high three-figure ukes, too. What I find fascinating is that I have played some wonderful Ohana, Mainland, Kala, Lanikai, and Oscar Schmidt ukes. The interesting thing is that each ukulele is distinctly different. What you pay for with the "K" brands is high-grade woods and high quality across the board... high-quality of multiple ukes just pulled off the rack. The lower-priced ukes can be hit and miss, some more than others. There are some companies that just keep getting better and at great prices. I enjoy them all.

PhilUSAFRet
06-15-2011, 09:55 AM
I think "snobbery" is more about "a feeling of superiority" over the owner of the "perceived inferior uke" than your assessment of it's relative quality (re construction, finish, feel, sound, etc. etc.) Even on UU, It seems, at times, that few people show interest in noobs questions about what many consider to be an "inferior uke." That's one reason I try and go out of my way to help them if I can. It's special to them. Let someone ask a question about a Kamaka, and you quickly get 20 or 30 responses.
Not accusing anyone of anything, just an observation.

janeray1940
06-15-2011, 10:06 AM
I think "snobbery" is more about "a feeling of superiority" over the owner of the "perceived inferior uke" than your assessment of it's relative quality (re construction, finish, feel, sound, etc. etc.) Even on UU, It seems, at times, that few people show interest in noobs questions about what many consider to be an "inferior uke." That's one reason I try and go out of my way to help them if I can. It's special to them. Let someone ask a question about a Kamaka, and you quickly get 20 or 30 responses.
Not accusing anyone of anything, just an observation.

Interesting observation, and I've thought about that before too - rarely do I respond to the non-Kamaka related threads asking for recommendations, mainly because I don't know a whole lot about the mid- and lower-end ukes to begin with.

When I first started playing, I bought a bottom-of-the-line Ohana to tide me over until I could find the vintage Martin of my dreams. I hated that thing - which, in retrospect, was because I hasn't yet learned that changing out the stock strings would improve it dramatically. And because the sound was so mediocre, it made me feel like I was a terrible player even though I knew I was competent enough. Between reading posts here and seeing it happen in real life, I realized that if I didn't go straight for the instrument of my dreams, I'd likely find myself on an endless cycle of UAS, buying and then selling multiple low- or mid-range ukes.

Turned out I was wrong when I thought a vintage mahogany Martin would be The One for me - I fell hard for the sound of koa, and was fortunate enough to have several Kamakas come into my life. I know that this isn't possible for everybody, and I feel really fortunate that it was possible for me. So I try to keep this in mind when it comes to others and the ukes that they play.

I've heard far better players than myself make a Mahalo sound fantastic. If anybody is entitled to snobbery or a feeling of superiority, it should be them and not me! I think a higher-quality instrument can make up for many of a player's faults, but in the end it's not the instrument but the player.

dnewton2
06-15-2011, 02:15 PM
Defiantly a 'ukulele snob. :D

guitarsnrotts
06-15-2011, 02:35 PM
It's what your ears like. I do consider myself a bit of a guitar snob as I consider non-Martin guitars inferior to Martins. But Martins have that Martin sound that I like. And I'm referring to the 'real' Martins made of solid wood not HPL.
Similar situation with ukes. It's the sound. When I first started playing uke I bought a Lanikai LU-21 and was happy with what I heard until I happened upon a recent Martin S-O at a reasonable price. It had a far superior purer tone and I put the Lanikai aside. I then came across a Kamaka soprano for a real steal and it just spoke to me. The sound of the koa just sounded to me what a ukulele should sound like and I put the Martin aside. Not a snob but what the ears like.
Now superior musicianship will always make lesser instruments sound better but better instruments sound superior.

webby
06-15-2011, 02:56 PM
If I had $1000 to spend on a uke for me, I would rather spend that same money and buy 20 cheap ukes and supply a classroom of kids their 1st uke.. )

What a wonderful thing to bring to this discussion, love and respect to you.

haolejohn
06-15-2011, 05:18 PM
so I guess the general consensus is that I am not a snob:)

In all seriousness, I have nothing against cheaper ukes. Not all my ukes are koalohas. I have everything from cheap dolphins to a custom ana'ole (though it will be officially gone next week). My favorite uke (KoAloha concert) is no longer with me and my next favorite uke (Mele 6 stringer) is no longer with me either. My most played uke is a Mele redwood tenor at the house but outside the house is the mainland redcedar concert. My sceptre is my best ukulele and best sounding one but I am debating letting it go b/c I never play it except on special occasions (set up high g and I prefer low g).

I do want to clarify that the owner of this LP was very happy with it. I wasn't happy with the sound of it at all. I prefer the sound of the dolphin.
As far as the suggestion ( I think "snobbery" is more about "a feeling of superiority" over the owner of the "perceived inferior uke" than your assessment of it's relative quality (re construction, finish, feel, sound, etc. etc.)
I think could have merit if uke wasn't attatched to snob. The owner of the LP was way better than I was at his point in his uking skills. He is going to be a good one and pretty fast I think. But that LP was better suited as a zombie killer than an unplugged ukulele.
an example of my non snobbery:
Chindog was inquiring about a uke last night and I suggested he come here for help http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?48645-Which-Uke-would-you-recommend-Help-me-choose-between.....
I suggested the mainland and then the Ohana (I have nothing against less expensive ukuleles if the sound good).

For the record, I let my ana'ole go b/c I wasn't impressed with it. Doesn't mean it was bad. Just means it didn't appeal to me (at times it did though).

I have enjoyed reading everyone's comments.

SweetWaterBlue
06-16-2011, 04:34 AM
and should we go on to discuss whether you are a motorcycle snob, as most harley riders are?

ROFL - just kidding.

haolejohn
06-16-2011, 05:12 AM
and should we go on to discuss whether you are a motorcycle snob, as most harley riders are?

ROFL - just kidding.

As long as it has 2 wheels.

poppy
06-16-2011, 06:15 AM
Well most martin lovers of guitars are snobs LOL . But proves sound is in the ear of the beholder! I had a Gibson dove and loved the sweet smooth bassy sound it provided, But all my friends said If I was a true guitar played I had to have a martin. This was a in the early 60's and I could not afford 2 high dollar guitars ,so I sold the Gibson and bought a D-35 martin. I have regretted it forever NEVER learned to like the sound and got rid of it a few years later but have missed the Dove since the day I let it go. So are they snobs, I kinda think in most cases no they like that sound but it never worked for me.

Skitzic
06-16-2011, 09:59 AM
Well most martin lovers of guitars are snobs LOL . But proves sound is in the ear of the beholder! I had a Gibson dove and loved the sweet smooth bassy sound it provided, But all my friends said If I was a true guitar played I had to have a martin. This was a in the early 60's and I could not afford 2 high dollar guitars ,so I sold the Gibson and bought a D-35 martin. I have regretted it forever NEVER learned to like the sound and got rid of it a few years later but have missed the Dove since the day I let it go. So are they snobs, I kinda think in most cases no they like that sound but it never worked for me.

See the highlighted text, they are snobs. Snobbery is telling someone what they have sucks...get this. It's all personal preference.

Tudorp
06-16-2011, 10:07 AM
and should we go on to discuss whether you are a motorcycle snob, as most harley riders are?

ROFL - just kidding.

In my biker days, I rode two bikes (but only one at a time mind you) A 1968 Glide, and a 1972 Kawasaki Z1900. Loved em both, and rode with anyone that loved bikes and wanted to ride.. So, I rode a HD, but was never called a Bike Snob.. I think the Bike snobs are the biker wannabes that buys a bike, and rides only on the weekends. When I rode, it was my sole transportation, rain, shine, sleet or snow.. But then again, I'll play the heck out of a $30 uke just like I would play the heck out of a $3000 vintage Martin.. lol Bike or Uke snob for me? No... Maybe a Bike or Uke Slob... lol

haolejohn
06-16-2011, 10:52 AM
In my biker days, I rode two bikes (but only one at a time mind you) A 1968 Glide, and a 1972 Kawasaki Z1900. Loved em both, and rode with anyone that loved bikes and wanted to ride.. So, I rode a HD, but was never called a Bike Snob.. I think the Bike snobs are the biker wannabes that buys a bike, and rides only on the weekends. When I rode, it was my sole transportation, rain, shine, sleet or snow.. But then again, I'll play the heck out of a $30 uke just like I would play the heck out of a $3000 vintage Martin.. lol Bike or Uke snob for me? No... Maybe a Bike or Uke Slob... lol

most of the bike snobs I know are HD owners and Honda owners. I know some former Outlaws that won't ride with you unless you are on a HD, and I know some Honda guys that are snobs as well. To me, I just want to ride. I love riding anything with two wheels and love riding with anyone that loves riding. I'll play the heck out of any uke as well but I am more selective with my uke purchasing.

Tudorp
06-16-2011, 11:01 AM
I am more selective with my uke purchasing.

That's a given. As far as purchasing for yourself. You should be. That's not "snob" a snob isn't willing to even consider anything else. In my Gibson circles, we call them "Headstock Snobs", refering to the folks that turn their nose up to anything that doesn't have a gibson headstock and name on it. They wont even consider an Epiphone. I have both Gibson and Epiphone Les Pauls (guitars), and I have to be honest, I love my Gibson, but, My Epiphone counterpart plays just as well, and sounds as good as my Gibson. When you are a snob, you miss out on way too much IMHO.. ;)

webby
06-16-2011, 11:07 AM
and should we go on to discuss whether you are a motorcycle snob, as most harley riders are?

ROFL - just kidding.

I dont understand that at all, a Harley isn't motorbike, its a tractor with 2 wheels missing. (potato, potato, potato) thats the noise they make.

Tudorp
06-16-2011, 11:17 AM
I dont understand that at all, a Harley isn't motorbike, its a tractor with 2 wheels missing. (potato, potato, potato) thats the noise they make.

lol... Now that is funny, I don't care who ya are.. It's that sack of potatos that made them infamous.. ;)

OldePhart
06-16-2011, 02:27 PM
I think it is a mistake to assume that a lot of players that play those plebian less than $200 ukes don't know what a $1000 uke sounds like. I think it is more of a what is it worth to them sort of thing. I have played most of the K brand ukes, as well as LoPrinzi and several other high-end ukes. Some sound a bit better than my lowly Ohana SK35, but not hundreds of dollars better (to me). Perhaps I just have crappy ears, because my Ohana doesn't sound like a toy to me, even though I only paid around $130 for it used, with a case. I guess I feel about the same way about my Lanikai ST, even though it was a sub-$100 demo. I'm starting to think I must be a Neanderthal, since I have also drank $500+ bottles of wine but didn't think they tasted better than the stuff they sell for $12.
+1 I have a couple of "K brands" and a few Mainlands. I paid almost $600 (used) for my KoAloha longneck (concert neck) soprano. If Mainland had offered a concert neck soprano in mango I wouldn't have purchased the KoAloha. Yes, my KoAlohas are certainly better than my Mainlands - are they enough better to justify the difference in price? No, at least not on my current income level. If I had deeper pockets sure, I'd own nothing but K-brands or customs. As it is, I feel no need to replace my Mainland mango tenor with something better. Could I find a better uke? Sure. Do I need a better uke? Not unless money becomes far less significant an obstacle for me than it currently is.

John

philpot
06-16-2011, 03:09 PM
I don't have time to read this whole thread, so I'm just replying to the original post... I totally agree. The Les Paul I played sounded... thick, dull, plunky, and just general un-musical... I really didn't enjoy it at all :/

haole
06-16-2011, 03:43 PM
It's hard to be a uke snob when I know people who can play circles around me and make their cheap ukes sound better than me on my best uke.

Jnobianchi
06-17-2011, 06:23 AM
being able to tell the difference is not the same as being a snob. And, really loving a great instrument doesn't mean you can't use or enjoy a crappy one.

I've got a $20 Hilo I keep at my desk, just in case I need to play something. ;) It needed help, so I've shaved the saddle and cut the nut slots deeper and made as much of it as possible. Not great, not even good, but the intonation is better than it was and it's there for me. I've also got a Martin 0 that's a GREAT instrument. I'm not ever going to confuse them, but it's good to have the both of them for what they're good for.

BTW - that Les Paul sounds pretty dead and dull unplugged; plugged in, it's a different animal - not something I'd get, but it's much more how it should be played, and when you think about the fact that it's $100, its actually pretty good value. It's not one I'm personally going to buy (doesn't suit my style of play), but for a decent sounding electric at a low price, it's all right!

RPeoples
07-28-2011, 05:09 AM
OK Larry, I'm here...now what? First of all, I don't think John could be anykind of snob. The Les Paul Uke doesn't make sense to me. It has to have an amp but I guess so does a U-Bass and I would really like to own one of those. Larry, I think you should buy one and just let me play it. : )

joejeweler
07-28-2011, 05:14 AM
so tonight the SEUkers had a pretty awesome java jam. Had 20 or so ukers showed up and even had a semi-local luthier show up as well. It was a good night of ukeing and the opportunity to try many different ukes. I look forward to java jams b/c of the diversity of the ukes that show up. Got to play three new ukes that i have never played before. Two were made by local luthiers. One from Sewanee, Tn (2 1/2 hour drive) and one from the metro atl (gourd ukes) These two ukes sounded great. Especially the Sewanee, Tn guys. I will find the name and post some info later. I just don't remember what his ukes name was. But on to the snobbery question.

I also got to play one of the les paul ukes. Not going to lie. It sounded like complete crap. It was so quiet and tinky sounded that I wanted to throw it down but I knew that it wouldn't break b/c the thing is so sturdy, it would be my choice to kill zombies with. The top was the thickest top i have ever seen and it's weight was so much, I found my self looking for a strap. I know there are some here that like that piece of junk but for $100 I expect a lot more. Am I a uke snob? Am I going against the norm for a uke player (everything is supposed to be OK and happy)? Please enlighten me.

Are you going to believe all the advertizing hype,.....or your lying ears? hehe

RPeoples
07-28-2011, 05:20 AM
and BTW, I really like the sound of my Mainland Red Cedar Concert, I would lke to own their pineapple, soprano and a tenor in Red Cedar, I love the bark the Red Cedar seems to make. I also like my Solid Mahogany Kala Soprano, first 'cause it was my first uke (if yo don't count the plastic one I had when I was around 5 years old, would be fun if I still had it) and as I have improved my playing the Kala seems to sound better originally it seemed sort of dull in tone.

mm stan
07-28-2011, 05:31 AM
Wow snob seems so harsh...spoiled may be a better word...tee hee hee... I have tried from the entry level to customs..I still enjoy my 24.99 Rogue soprano...actually I am happy with any uke...
Main thing is I have one....Happy Strummings

Ron98GT
07-28-2011, 05:59 AM
LOL!! I do wish I had an amp to plug it in. I know that is what it is designed for and to get guitar players to buy one for that sentimental value effect:)

Yep, that's me.

ksiegel
07-28-2011, 06:08 AM
With a little work - bone nut, bone saddle, reset neck, new strings - the Epi Les Paul uke sounds just fine acoustically.

Granted, I didn't do the work - Tudorp did it - so I don't know how much time was involved, but it is a completely different instrument, and well worth the price paid, as well as the cost of the modifications (to me).

Is it as nice as my Kala Cedar Top? No, and I didn't expect it to be. But it is just fine - and I haven't even plugged it in yet.

-Kurt

Ron98GT
07-28-2011, 06:16 AM
and should we go on to discuss whether you are a motorcycle snob, as most harley riders are?

ROFL - just kidding.

Yeah, I'm a Harley snob & proud of it. Although I got rid of Concorde Purple & Diamond Ice, chromed out, 2001 1200 Custom last night, I still have my 2003 Anniversary Gun Metal Blue FLHTCUI Ultra Classic.

Magoosan
07-28-2011, 06:20 AM
Interesting how long this thread has carried on. I think it really comes down to the ear of the beholder. I have a Fluke concert but my primary gigging uke is a Pono MPT-E. Worked up from a Kala to a Mainland to the Pono. Had the opportunity while on vacation last week to go to Elderly Instruments in Lansing, MI. Wonderful place with great inventory of high end ukes. Aren't many places outside of Hawaii I'm guessing where you can do that. At any rate, I went fully prepared to pull the trigger on a Kamaka HF-3. Played that as well as an HF-1 and a Pineapple. Played it for a long time, but to make a long story short (and this may sound like sacrilege) I just don't think it gave me much more than the Pono. Don't get me wrong, it sounded wonderful and offered some interesting overtones I don't get from the Pono. But my sense is you have to play it pretty agressively to get the most out of it and I'm not that kind of player. But by the time I would add a pick-up it would be twice the price of the Pono. Bottom line is I'm liking the Pono even more now.

Ron98GT
07-28-2011, 06:33 AM
so tonight the SEUkers had a pretty awesome java jam. Had 20 or so ukers showed up and even had a semi-local luthier show up as well. It was a good night of ukeing and the opportunity to try many different ukes. I look forward to java jams b/c of the diversity of the ukes that show up. Got to play three new ukes that i have never played before. Two were made by local luthiers. One from Sewanee, Tn (2 1/2 hour drive) and one from the metro atl (gourd ukes) These two ukes sounded great. Especially the Sewanee, Tn guys. I will find the name and post some info later. I just don't remember what his ukes name was. But on to the snobbery question.

I also got to play one of the les paul ukes. Not going to lie. It sounded like complete crap. It was so quiet and tinky sounded that I wanted to throw it down but I knew that it wouldn't break b/c the thing is so sturdy, it would be my choice to kill zombies with. The top was the thickest top i have ever seen and it's weight was so much, I found my self looking for a strap. I know there are some here that like that piece of junk but for $100 I expect a lot more. Am I a uke snob? Am I going against the norm for a uke player (everything is supposed to be OK and happy)? Please enlighten me.

1. Yes, you are a snob.

2. Yes, the Epi Les Paul uke is crap (actually sounds like crap more than is crap, but still cool & only $99).

3. As I've said before, the Epi sounds like a cheap laminated guitar with nylon strings, which it is (it is what it is).

4. Yes, I'm a snob (still waiting for my Kanilea to come in).

GX9901
07-28-2011, 06:39 AM
I've got one of the Epiphone Les Pauls. Replying to the original post, I too found it dead and crappy sounding when I first got it, even though I had rock bottom expectations for its sound. I swapped the stock string out for Aquilas and it sounded much much better, to the point where I like it more than some import solid wood ukes I've played before.

I think I probably qualify as a uke snob, but in this case, I think the strings are doing the ukulele the disservice, not my uke snobbery.:p