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View Full Version : Help me with some chord reading for "Tico Tico"



ikarin
06-16-2011, 04:36 PM
Hello, everyone!

I've just started to learn Tico Tico, and found some chords that I never come across with slash!

eg) A+/C#, or F#/A#

I figure out "/" means "on," so "A+/C#" means Aaug on C#, but what's chord figuring like??

It'd be great if someone teach me on this.
Thanks!!!

Ken Middleton
06-16-2011, 10:43 PM
A+ is 2110. The C# refers to the bass note. you can't easily do this on a uke. It is much easier of a guitar or piano. If a bass is playing with you, the priciple note they play is C#. It is a first inversion chord.

The other chord is a regular F# chord. Again, the A# is the bass note.

Ukulele JJ
06-16-2011, 11:02 PM
Hmmm... that's a good way to think of the "slash" (meaning "on"). Never heard that before.

Anyway, the regular A+ chord is played as 2110. As it turns out, assuming you're playing a standard-tuned (high G) ukulele, it already is an A+/C#!

It's true. Look at the lowest note you're playing. It's on the C string. But it's one step up from C because you're hitting that first fret. That makes it a C#. You're playing your A+ on a C#.

As it turns out, a lot of the standard chord voicing we play are really "secret slash chords". F is really an F/C. G is really a G/D. A is really A/C#.

In all of these cases, the bottom of the slash (the note that the chord is "on") is a note that's supposed to be in the chord already. We're just putting it on the bottom--making it the lowest note. Chords usually don't mind when you mix up the order of their notes. (There are some slash chords you'll encounter where the bottom-of-the-slash note is not already part of the chord--it's an "extra" note. Those are trickier.)

Now on to the F#/A#. The good news is that A# is already in a regular F# chord. The bad news is that, by the time you've made A# the lowest note, there's not much room left above that for the other notes in the chord! You'd have to play it something like 11-10-9-9. Waaaay up on the neck! And it would probably sound goofy to suddenly jump all the way up there just to get the low note correct. And the so-called "low" note wouldn't be that low anyway!

So what's the answer? Just ignore the slash chord stuff and play a regular F# chord, which is 3121 (and which is "secretly" an F#/C# by the way... but don't tell anyone!)

See, as I mentioned, you've really been playing slash chords all the time in songs that called for the regular (root position) version of the chord. You didn't notice. No one you played for noticed. It was no big deal!

Likewise, you can often play regular chords when the song calls for a slash chord and no one will notice either.

And man, you sure picked a hard song to learn. :p

JJ

pekelo
06-17-2011, 05:04 AM
Let me try to Tab out some of this - I play this starting in the key
of Bminor (2 sharps) then this goes to the key of D (2 sharps)
then to the key of Bmajor(29 sharps:), finally ending at the key of Bminor
But I think this is an advanced piece! ... could be good inspiration for beginners...
pekelo www.pekelosbooks.com

ikarin
06-19-2011, 03:43 PM
A+ is 2110. The C# refers to the bass note. you can't easily do this on a uke. It is much easier of a guitar or piano. If a bass is playing with you, the priciple note they play is C#. It is a first inversion chord.

The other chord is a regular F# chord. Again, the A# is the bass note.

Ken,

thanks for explaining this.
Now I understand C# is the bass note, i.e. whatever note after slash is a bass note, and it's difficult to play in uke.

P.S. It's great to learn from you, for I love your celtic ukulele e-book, whcih I bought a while ago.

ikarin
06-19-2011, 03:49 PM
Ukulele JJ,

thank you very much for explaining all this.

I never thought of that many standard chord voicing are "secret slash chords", like F is really an F/C, which is amazing.

And I like your answer "Just ignore the slash chord stuff and play a regular F# chord";)