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nelly
06-17-2011, 08:10 AM
Hello everybody,this might seem silly but while i have a good strum,my eldow on the inside of my arm is really painfull.
Does this seem normal!!!!

hoosierhiver
06-17-2011, 08:36 AM
No, it is not normal. I'd look into it. Is it just the one elbow and only when strumming?
Joint pain can be the sign of some serious conditions.

patico
06-17-2011, 09:21 AM
it is normal to have that kind of pain after repetitive movements. if you keep executing the same repetitive movement, in time you'll develop a tendinitis.

so keep the practice ... but..... as soon as you start feelin some kind of pain or discomfort, change exercise. struming, fingespicking, picados, etc,
in between long studies, rest n stretch your muscles.


Iorana
(i'm surgeon so ask anything else if you want)

mm stan
06-17-2011, 11:48 AM
Aloha Nelly,
Certainly not normal...are you strumming with your wrist instead your whole arm..practice good techique, maybe that is the issue..get some rest and if it persists,, see a doctor...no sense
overdoing it and damaging something maybe permanently...good luck man...MM Stan

nelly
06-17-2011, 11:55 AM
Thanks for advice guys!!! will take your advice on board!

PhilUSAFRet
06-17-2011, 12:33 PM
Sounds like "tennis Elbow" Good advice, check technique, ice, see ortho if need be. You don't want that condition to get "too bad." Had it, had to wear a special band around arm to put pressure on that tendon. don't want it again.

ItsMrPitchy
06-17-2011, 12:58 PM
I would check it out if it carrys on just in case you know the old saying 'better safe than sorry'. All depends how painful but you want comfort while playing.

Ron
06-17-2011, 02:12 PM
I found as my style relaxed I got less stress on my right elbow and wrist. My technique is still complete rubbish but I don't get a tired arm anymore.
Meanwhile I do get sore fingers on my left hand because I'm a "grabber" and old rugby injuries are starting to plague me. I have found joint tablets with glucosomine very good.

garywj
06-17-2011, 02:21 PM
I'm not a "pills and herbs" kind of guy, but have been using glucosamine for joint pain for years with good results. It's worth a try. If it doesn't help in a month, it probably won't. It takes at least 1500mg per day.

Harold O.
06-17-2011, 05:23 PM
I get that pain in my left (fretting) elbow when I play too long. I think it has to do with the hand rotation to accommodate fingering. Aspirin and such have proven ineffective. It takes several days for it to go away. Odd.

bbqribs
06-17-2011, 06:03 PM
Sounds like "tennis Elbow" Good advice, check technique, ice, see ortho if need be. You don't want that condition to get "too bad." Had it, had to wear a special band around arm to put pressure on that tendon. don't want it again.

Close, actually "golfer's elbow". Gentle movements for warm up, good technique, ice, forearm band, stretching if needed, antiinflammatory meds. if appropriate, and see your PCP, are all good advice.

nelly
06-17-2011, 10:31 PM
Thanks for all the advice once again. Itry to relax my arm as much as possible but when i finnish playing my strumming arm seems to be stuck in that possition and it hurts like mad to straighten out ( maybe a support and some tabs mite do trick) just gutted as i have only started playing for a couple of months :(

ichadwick
06-18-2011, 01:40 AM
I'm not a "pills and herbs" kind of guy, but have been using glucosamine for joint pain for years with good results. It's worth a try. If it doesn't help in a month, it probably won't. It takes at least 1500mg per day.
Do some research on which brands are best. To be most effective, glucosamine needs to work in conjunction with other chemicals and is often mixed with like chondroitin (that's also a blood thinner) and MSM (methylsulfonylmethane). Dosages need to be high, too - 1,500 mg a day. Somewhere around 25-33% of the population gain no benefit from glucosamine, so it may be an expensive but ultimately pointless experiment for a few months.

My wife suffers from a similar ache and gets steroid injections periodically to combat it. Me, I prefer medicinal tequila...

hoosierhiver
06-18-2011, 02:44 AM
Ibuprofen is a great drug. Pain reliever and anti-inflammatory. and it's cheap!

roxhum
06-18-2011, 03:28 AM
I would go to a doctor and get physical therapy. Best to fix it sooner rather than later. And then head on over to the Wine Country Uke Fest in CA because there is going to be a workshop about good ergonomics.

webby
06-18-2011, 04:38 AM
try chewing coaca leaves, you'll play faster too.

Lori
06-18-2011, 10:28 AM
You might be pinching a nerve against the edge of the uke if it is your strumming arm. You might consider a strap, in case you are using extra effort holding the uke. Also, force yourself to move around your arm position between songs when you play. I found that I didn't realize I was getting stiff until I had played 3 or 4 songs in a row. Good luck on subduing the problem.

–Lori

P.S. A full strap with strap button would be best for you, but if you don't want to alter your uke there is my Uke Leash. The Uke Leash booth will be at the Wine Country Uke Fest if you want to try out one in person. We will also be at the San Diego and Anaheim Uke Festivals.

nelly
06-19-2011, 05:34 AM
Hi lori, i started to play my little banjo uke and the pain as eased, so maybe you could be right about pinching a nerve on edge of uke... Fingers crossed!!!
oh and i have bin using a uke leash

Lori
06-19-2011, 06:19 AM
Hi lori, i started to play my little banjo uke and the pain as eased, so maybe you could be right about pinching a nerve on edge of uke... Fingers crossed!!!
oh and i have bin using a uke leash
That is good news. If you play sitting down, try playing the uke away from your body, with it sitting in your lap or on your thigh. The sound projection is so much better when you don't have the uke pressed against your body, and it may change where your arm rests on the edge of the uke. The elbow has some very large nerves close to the surface, and it is very easy to pinch them. The Uke Leash will help you hold up the neck. I remember sending yours to you... Stoke on Trent is such a colorful town name!
Cheers
Lori

scottie
06-19-2011, 06:53 AM
Sounds like "tennis Elbow" Good advice, check technique, ice, see ortho if need be. You don't want that condition to get "too bad." Had it, had to wear a special band around arm to put pressure on that tendon. don't want it again.

Actually, tennis elbow is on the radius side (the thumb side / outside) of the arm at the elbow. I know because I've been dealing with a mild case of tennis elbow in my left arm (fretting hand) that has come and gone for the last several years. I play 12 fret guitars with 1 13/16 and 1 7/8 inch nut widths - midway between an OM and a Classical guitar.

Sounds like "Golfer's elbow" which is on the Ulnar side. Google Golfer's elbow stretches for gentle stretching. Stretch while you warm up and stop every 15 - 20 minutes to do gentle stretching and relax the arm. DON'T FORCE THE STRETCHES or you'll risk further injury.

With proper attention (perhaps a doctor's visit as well) these types of injuries are manageable and will heal with time. If you force things, neglect to warm up before playing, stretch too vigorously, you can risk exacerbating it.

pulelehua
06-19-2011, 10:21 AM
Given that you've only been playing a few months, I would guess that it's bad technique. Which isn't as much a criticism as it may sound. When you (you in the general, not "you" specifically type sense) first start playing, you tend to carry huge amounts of unnecessary tension in your arm. You also tend to provide too much of the drive for your playing from the wrong places. Playing is quite a sophisticated movement, and your muscles have to learn how to relax. There's also the matter that some of the muscles in question have probably spent your life doing very little. So they need to strengthen, in order to relax, in order to get the other muscles to relax. All of this tends to put too much strain on joints as well.

There is a certain maximum level of physical development at the beginning. I know this sounds silly. It's just a ukulele. But I've dealt with two non-music related physical problems, and one music-related one (from sax playing, so totally unrelated). In all 3 cases, you don't work through them. You work around them. You don't push things. As others have suggested, you don't want an acute problem becoming a chronic one.

So, take it easy.

Oh, and Lori, "colourful" is a term applied to Stoke quite a lot. ;)