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View Full Version : So I just chipped off a piece of my Kanile'a's headstock...



ItsAMeCasey
06-18-2011, 11:41 AM
Every morning I have coffee and play ukulele with my grandma. She lives right next door so I just bring over my Kanile'a and we just casually strum some songs. Today as I was leaving and saying goodbye, I was careless and accidentally hit the door with the headstock of my Kanilea. I died a little inside when I saw that a piece of the wood of the headstock chipped off.. It's not a HUGE piece, but it's definitely noticeable. Maybe i'm subconsciously being less careful about my instrument because I'm going to Waikiki today and possibly buying a new Kamaka HF-3, but I'm still pretty sad about the damage. Any of you guys have similar stories that could possibly make me feel better? lol

Tudorp
06-18-2011, 11:48 AM
Years ago, picked up my Rickenbacker 4001 in it's case off the couch in a greenroom just before a gig and didn't notice the latches weren't latched all the way until I felt my Ric tumbling down my theigh and bouncing off the floor. At that time, I heard some woman screaming, then realized that wasn't some woman, it was me.. lol... Feel better now?

Nixon
06-18-2011, 11:53 AM
My old Martin has plenty of scratches and dents, but I see them as a sign of love. Would much prefer to have a beat up and well played instrument than an unused instrument in perfect nick.

ItsAMeCasey
06-18-2011, 11:55 AM
Lol, thanks guys. Yeah, I'm trying to think about it as a sign that the instrument is well-played lol. Still, seeing that gash on the headstock just makes me cringe..

Nuprin
06-18-2011, 11:59 AM
About a week after I got my Moore Bettah, I was being careless when taking it out of the case and the lid fell down. Put a pinpoint ding in it. It's barely noticeable (no one from work noticed it until I pointed it out) but I still know it's there. I felt like crying when it happened.

Doc_J
06-18-2011, 12:15 PM
If it were just a dent, 'steaming' the dent with a microwaved wetted cloth might bring out a dent.

(CAUTION: you can mess up the finish or burn yourself)

NO HEAT GUNS OR SOLDERING IRONS.

molokinirum
06-18-2011, 12:19 PM
Ouch!!!! Since you are going to Waikiki...bring it with you and go to Kaniel'a and see what they can do! Just a thought!

olgoat52
06-18-2011, 12:26 PM
About a week after I got my Moore Bettah, I was being careless when taking it out of the case and the lid fell down. Put a pinpoint ding in it. It's barely noticeable (no one from work noticed it until I pointed it out) but I still know it's there. I felt like crying when it happened.

For that kind of money... Cry me a River! :)

Tudorp
06-18-2011, 12:54 PM
If its a dent, you can also steam it like mentioned above, but use a soldering iron. Take a wet terry cloth towel, put it over the dent, rub a hot soldering iron over the cloth, over the dent. The steam from it, will steam, and iron out the dent. It works on minor to moderate dents. Of course the larger the damage, the less it will work, but you get the picture.

mm stan
06-18-2011, 01:06 PM
Aloha Casey,
Sorry about to hear of the dent brah....You must be all sick...Check out Dan's guitars on bertania and McCully street...good selection and Easy town side..
You know when you get a new car and you get your first dent..it's the same feeling..It's not perfect anymore...after a few years...and a couple of scratches(hope not)
I'll feel more comfortable with mine....

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-18-2011, 01:17 PM
PLEASE, please, do not use any kind of heat treatment (like a soldering iron) in an attempt to remove a dent. While this method is sometimes effective on raw, unfinished wood, it doesn't nothing on a finished instrument other than to ruin the finish and make a mess of things.

Nuprin
06-18-2011, 01:22 PM
I can live with it. Again, it is so, so tiny and can only be seen in certain angles. But I know it's there.

wickedwahine11
06-18-2011, 01:27 PM
All three of my high end ukes have some damage to them.

My Kanile'a K2 tenor has a couple of tiny chips in it from when my moron spouse knocked it onto the floor. My KoAloha Pineapple Sunday has a gouge in it from a string winder -- I now hand wind those tuners when I change strings! And my Kamaka HF3 tenor has a few scratches on the back of it from playing it while wearing button down shirts -- I now only wear non button shirts when wearing it. It also has a seam separation on the top that is slowly but surely disappearing through my forced humidification efforts.

Suffice to say each one of them, when the injuries in question were suffered, made me feel like a dagger to the heart. I felt like crying over the Kamaka in particular. Now, they are just scars -- no different than scars I have myself. They show the instruments are loved, cared and played, albeit by a rather clumsy owner. :)

PhilUSAFRet
06-18-2011, 01:44 PM
Ouch!!!! Since you are going to Waikiki...bring it with you and go to Kaniel'a and see what they can do! Just a thought!

I second the motion! orrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr......you can always sell it to me really, really cheap!

ItsAMeCasey
06-18-2011, 01:45 PM
Thanks for the kind words everyone. Nuprin I'm sorry to hear that your Moore Bettah was slightly damaged. It's such a beautiful instrument I can only dream of one day having one :P

Unfortunately a piece of wood literally got chipped off the right end of the headstock, so I think it's pretty non-repairable. It's okay though, I'm kind of adjusted already.

And WickedWahine, I think I saw the thread of when your Kamaka was having a problem. I'm glad to hear that it's slowly going back to normal :)

bbycrts
06-18-2011, 03:22 PM
I have a very dear friend with a bunch of scuffs and nicks on her Moore Bettah. I think it made me die more inside than her. To her it just shows that she plays it a lot...

haole
06-18-2011, 04:33 PM
Nothing wrong with a battle scar. It's inevitable, and it'll probably be the first of many! That's why I try to buy used ukes whenever possible; it's less devastating when stuff gets dinged or scratched or cracked. If I can scrape the funds together for a custom Moore Bettah I'd be happy if it was already played first, because nothing stays pristine in my house for very long. :B

experimentjon
06-18-2011, 04:39 PM
I've dinged most of my instruments.

The worst is probably my Kamaka Tenor...I bought it used with some cosmetic damage. And man, that is a battle scar. I do not have a pic of it though. Suffice to say, its like 50 dings stringed together.

I was sad when I first dinged my Kanilea Tenor too. But now, I can't even remember where the ding is off the top of my head. LOL. I bet I have multiple dings on it by now.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-18-2011, 04:41 PM
Nothing discourages me more than to see one of my ukes that's a couple of years old yet it still looks like new. It's a normal reaction to freak when your new baby gets it's first scratch but normal wear and tear only means it has character and lots of stories to tell. And after all, playing the ukulele is just telling your story.

Lexxy
06-18-2011, 04:54 PM
Every scar has a story to tell!

MGM
06-18-2011, 07:05 PM
My absolute worst story had a near mint vintage aero uke and had forgotten i left it on my bed came home late walked into dark bedroom and flung myself on the bed.....cruuuuuuuuunnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnch need i say more

webby
06-18-2011, 07:14 PM
my wife dropped her 1920s vintage saxophone from waist height onto a hardwood stage, and i bought myself a brand new acoustic guitar once that was pretty expensive and 3 days after i bought it i knocked it over and snapped off a tuning peg as the headstock smashed into a stone fireplace.

and my 1976 12 string looks like it's been through a war zone.

RyanMFT
06-18-2011, 07:16 PM
Sorry about the chip on your uke. I would feel exactly the same as you. However, as I think about it, in time you may come to love that little chip as it is a direct link to the time together with your grandmother. Your time with her sounds very special and your uke will always carry a reminder of what is really important in life......time with special people in our lives!

Gillian
06-18-2011, 08:31 PM
I agree with the suggestion to bring it to Kanile'a and see what they can do. If you still have the chip, maybe they can glue it back on and re-do the finish so It's not so noticeable.

You're lucky to live so close to the makers of that gorgeous instrument.

ItsAMeCasey
06-18-2011, 10:22 PM
Thanks for the kind words guys, really makes me feel better! Unfortunately I have no idea where the little chip of wood went so I don't think anything can really be done about the damage. But i'm pretty much okay with it now so it's all good :D No Kamaka tenor for me today though, I went to PuaPua and they were all sold out. Checked Bob's Ukulele in Royal Hawaiian shopping center and they had one but the 3rd string buzzed like crazy so I didn't buy it lol. Hopefully soon though!

Lexxy
06-18-2011, 10:44 PM
Thanks for the kind words guys, really makes me feel better! Unfortunately I have no idea where the little chip of wood went so I don't think anything can really be done about the damage. But i'm pretty much okay with it now so it's all good :D No Kamaka tenor for me today though, I went to PuaPua and they were all sold out. Checked Bob's Ukulele in Royal Hawaiian shopping center and they had one but the 3rd string buzzed like crazy so I didn't buy it lol. Hopefully soon though!

ARE YOU GONNA LET THE KANILE'A GO?? sorry. I've calmed myself down. Heh.

ItsAMeCasey
06-18-2011, 10:48 PM
ARE YOU GONNA LET THE KANILE'A GO?? sorry. I've calmed myself down. Heh.

lol no i'm still gonna keep the Kanile'a. I just woke up one day and thought to myself, "damn, I want a Kamaka tenor." I have enough money saved up so I figured why the heck not, and made the decision to start looking to buy one. The Kanile'a holds a special place in my heart :P

Ronnie Aloha
06-19-2011, 04:58 AM
Casey,

I have a Kamaka soprano. When I was about seven or eight (over 40 years ago) my folks had bought it for me--like most kids in Hawaii those days we took uke lessons. My dad engraved my name on the side of the headstock. A couple of years ago I took it into Kamaka to have it refinished and repaired since the top was separating. When I got it back they had sanded down the side of the headstock and the engraved name was gone! I was bummed since it was a reminder of my dad who had passed away in 2000. I never imagined they would sand it off. Of course, its worth more to another person without the engraved name (the "engraving" was made with the edge of a chisel so its not like it was this nice laser engraved font) but it is worth a LOT less to me.

Perhaps, in time, that chip in your headstock will bring you fond memories of playing with your grandma. And, if you ever take you Kanile'a in to have it refinished, make sure they do not fill it in!

Rick Turner
06-19-2011, 06:33 AM
Nothing discourages me more than to see one of my ukes that's a couple of years old yet it still looks like new. It's a normal reaction to freak when your new baby gets it's first scratch but normal wear and tear only means it has character and lots of stories to tell. And after all, playing the ukulele is just telling your story.

Thank you, Chuck! I totally agree.

Also, finish touch-up and cosmetic repairs like this are among the most difficult lutherie tasks you can take on. It can be incredibly maddening and difficult to blend wood and finishes, and it takes forever, and it takes years to learn how to do this kind of work well. What is really easy is making the problem look worse.

allanr
06-19-2011, 06:52 AM
Sorry about the chip on your uke. I would feel exactly the same as you. However, as I think about it, in time you may come to love that little chip as it is a direct link to the time together with your grandmother. Your time with her sounds very special and your uke will always carry a reminder of what is really important in life......time with special people in our lives!

Best answer yet. Gave me goosebumps. Besides there are few things sadder than seeing a vintage interment that looks like it was never played.

OldePhart
06-19-2011, 03:33 PM
I take pretty good care of my instruments but I don't cry when my favorites pick up little bits of "road rash." It just shows that they're my favorites and they're getting used. I accidentally dropped my custom-built-for-me SG guitar when I was returning it to the case about a week after I got it. Yep, chip in the paint on the back where it hit the metal rim of the hard case. I just figured it was nice that it wasn't on the front...

I flat won't own an instrument that is too nice to take to a gig - at least an indoor gig. After much agonizing I left my "road uke" home and took the KoAloha longneck to UWC. I just made sure I pulled my car up under the trees so when the uke was in the car it wouldn't self destruct from the heat.

When I got my ukes home I had to wipe them down and wax them from all the sweat and skin oils they'd picked up at UWC, but there wasn't any permanent damage.

John

Kauai808
06-20-2011, 03:43 AM
Nothing discourages me more than to see one of my ukes that's a couple of years old yet it still looks like new. It's a normal reaction to freak when your new baby gets it's first scratch but normal wear and tear only means it has character and lots of stories to tell. And after all, playing the ukulele is just telling your story.

That is what I'm saying. Instruments are meant to be played, not kept in a case. When I hand down my ukes to my kids when I die, I want them to look like Dad played them, not like they just came off the rack at puapua.

Skitzic
06-20-2011, 04:32 AM
The first ding is always the worst. I wanted to cry when I got the first ding in my guitar. Now I still get a little upset but I don't want to throw up...as much...