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NYG010
07-12-2011, 06:40 PM
Hey guys, so I know the answer to this is probably "wait until your muscle memory catches up", or just practicing more. But, I am having a hard time switching between particular chords in songs (where there is a long pause) in particular I have a hard time going from C to G (this might not seem that difficult to you pros!) but is there any other "easier" way to make a G? I have fat fingers so its getting difficult even after practicing all day!

NYG010
07-12-2011, 07:28 PM
Anyone out there??

SkeerRacing
07-12-2011, 07:37 PM
hate to say it but a fair amount of it is practice and muscle memory, also are you playing the c with your middle finger? Because if you are you could probably try using your ring, its just a straight drop to the c from the g and vise-versa

GreatGazukes
07-12-2011, 09:32 PM
Firstly...there is no such thing as muscle memory, the movements of your fingers is a function of the brain. The actions required to place your fingers requires differant parts of your brain communicating via cains of neurons ...."pathways", the more often the path is used, the more "free-er" the path becomes.

Now...to help you become better at placing your fingers in the right spots, take special note of how exactly your hand is placed on the neck, what parts are touching, how your wrist is angled, which parts of your fingers are touching, then what movement is required to get your fingers on the next chord. Consciuosly try to replicate these sensations. Speed is something you will acheive once you have accuracy. I recommend spending a short time before bed practicising, this allows the brain to "digest" what it has just been doing....And drink some water, a starved brain does not function well. Also do not program your brain with mistakes, when you have been practiciing for a period but find you are muffing up, stop and take a break.

That's your neurophysiology lesson for today, thanks for watching, lol

Hippie Dribble
07-12-2011, 09:54 PM
Wow. Thanks Doctor GG. Sage advice. Do you bulk bill? I'd like to make an appointment... :)

chiefnoda
07-12-2011, 11:15 PM
Hi NYG010

What about doing G using your pinky (0 0 0 3 as x x x A) and then G chord (0 2 3 2 using x I R M). I = index, M = middle, R = ring, A = pinky

The G chord with pinky is a bit hard, but the payback is that each of your fingers is used for one chord, not both. So you can form a chord shape *before* you fret a chord, C or G. Then, it becomes simply putting your fingers down while lifting others up.

Your IMR form the G chord, and I would still call it Muscle Memory (even though medically it is not correct, I just learned). Maybe I should say tactile feel......

Sometime it is beneficial to change the "usual" fingerings if you know the chord sequence.

Happy Pickin
Chief

ichadwick
07-13-2011, 01:01 AM
And drink some water, a starved brain does not function well...
Well, I prefer a glass of wine.... but not sure how water will feed a brain, since it lacks nutrients. (At least my water does - I can't speak for what comes out of your taps...). It will hydrate, but not feed. An unsweetened, natural juice would seem a better choice, or a tea or coffee for the caffeine, which can (under certain circumstances) improve neural activity. Pop is a bad choice (as it always is) because it gives a sugar rush at first, but then depletes the energy. Not to mention all those harmful acids (colas are more acidic than a car battery!).

The other side to that is the muscle's tone and flexibility from practice. Those muscles being used will strengthen and improve from use, be less prone to stress and stiffness because they get used to being used regularly. They become accustomed to being used in certain ways, to expanding and contracting on demand for specific tasks, and which is not "memory" but feels like it.

And the only solution to playing better or faster is one word: practice.

GreatGazukes
07-13-2011, 03:25 AM
Well, I prefer a glass of wine.... but not sure how water will feed a brain, since it lacks nutrients. (At least my water does - I can't speak for what comes out of your taps...). It will hydrate, but not feed.

Ian, I don't really have a breadth of musical talent that I can offer this forum, and I admit to being pleased when an occasion arises wherby I can offer a bit of knowledge that I have taken some effort to gain and memorise. Such a rejoinder as that quoted above diminishes my comfort to be an active participant in the UU.

lindydanny
07-13-2011, 03:49 AM
No quick fixes... Learn it right the first time.

With any new chord, your best bet is to practice just going back and forth from chord to chord until it comes quickly. This can be frustrating and boring at times, but it is the best way to get your fingers moving.

I once had the honor of speaking with rhythm guitarist Whit Smith of Hot Club Of Cowtown about this same issue. He uses a lot of difficult chord voicings that are not common in the guitar world today. He gave me the same piece of advice telling me he used to sit and watch a sitcom with the guitar in his lap just going back and forth (no strumming) from chords he already knew to the one he was trying to master.

I know it will take time, but keep at it and you'll be golden!

~DB

kissing
07-13-2011, 04:36 AM
When I hit a difficulty like this, I just relax and tell myself that it is simply a natural challenge that comes with trying something new.
With time it will get easier.

But keep in mind, a watched pot never boils.

I would stop worrying so much, just enjoy the music and practice.
Then one day, you just may surprise yourself. All of a sudden, you'll be able to play that transition as easy as breathing.

How do you find the E chord in comparison?
I hate that chord..

Coconut Willie
07-13-2011, 08:30 AM
You can also play the G chord by barring the C, E, A strings at the second fret using your index finger, and put you middle finger on the E string at the third fret.

NYG010
07-13-2011, 08:55 AM
Thank you all for your great advice (I know most of it will boil down to just practice and hours spent on the uke). And yes I use my ring finger currently to Play the C then move on to a regular G, which I am having the most "muted" space in between chords!! very frustrating!

ukulelecowboy
07-13-2011, 10:15 AM
Guess this has been said time but really practice is where it's at. For the past month I really needed to migrate up the fretboard to a closed, second position G7, A7, etc. That would be 4,5,3,5 etc. It took a while but with practice I was able "train" my fingers to move to those specific positions to the point where it has become second nature. I kept forcing myself to shoot for that chord position rather than the open 0,2,1,2 even during performances.

Now I'm battling two more A chords. Am7 = 2,4,3,3 and Am = 2,4,5,3 I'm getting there but I do blow it sometimes much to the the chagrin of my Duo partner...

Ukuleleblues
07-13-2011, 12:26 PM
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-muscle-memory.htm

http://news.guitarojam.com/musicians-health/muscle-memory-and-guitar-players-73/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_memory

OldePhart
07-13-2011, 12:38 PM
Ian, I don't really have a breadth of musical talent that I can offer this forum, and I admit to being pleased when an occasion arises wherby I can offer a bit of knowledge that I have taken some effort to gain and memorise. Such a rejoinder as that quoted above diminishes my comfort to be an active participant in the UU.

GreatGazukes,

Please don't allow the pedantry of a few to diminish your enjoyment of, or participation in, the forums. I'm reasonably certain that I am not alone in finding your posts quite useful and often entertaining; much more so than the posts of some who seem to cross the border from humorous to boorish far more frequently than seems either healthy or entertaining.

John

OldePhart
07-13-2011, 12:42 PM
Two words, "practice" and "rubber stamp." Oops, three words. :) Think of a chord as being a shape of your hand, like a rubber stamp. So, when you're moving from one chord to another you don't think "this finger at the third fret of the second string," and so on. It's just, "my hand should look like this and I put it here." In other words, you lift your fingers from one chord and as soon as they are clear of the strings they are already moving into the new shape, then you plunk them down at the correct location for the next chord.

Now, initially that probably seems even more difficult - but in practice you'll find it increases your speed and accuracy on chord changes. I was given that advice by a guy in a local guitar shop years ago when I was learning guitar and it was the best musical advice I've ever received, period.

The second technique is almost as important - analyze the song you are going to play in advance. No chord change should ever take you by surprise. While you are playing the C you should be mentally preparing for the move to the G, and so on. Another thing goes hand-in-hand with this - learn multiple forms of chords. Sometimes it makes sense to play a D as 2220 with either two or three fingers (depending on what's comfortable for you) - other times it makes sense to play it as 2220 with a barre over the strings, and sometimes as 2225 with a barre and pinky or ring finger on the 5. It all depends on what other chords are being played before and after the D. Analyzing the phrases of the song in advance will help you to choose the most sensible progression.

The above paragraph can best be summarized as - "think of a song as a sequence of chord changes, not as a sequence of chords.

John

PhilUSAFRet
07-13-2011, 01:10 PM
Well, I prefer a glass of wine.... but not sure how water will feed a brain, since it lacks nutrients. (At least my water does - I can't speak for what comes out of your taps...). It will hydrate, but not feed. An unsweetened, natural juice would seem a better choice, or a tea or coffee for the caffeine, which can (under certain circumstances) improve neural activity. Pop is a bad choice (as it always is) because it gives a sugar rush at first, but then depletes the energy. Not to mention all those harmful acids (colas are more acidic than a car battery!).

The other side to that is the muscle's tone and flexibility from practice. Those muscles being used will strengthen and improve from use, be less prone to stress and stiffness because they get used to being used regularly. They become accustomed to being used in certain ways, to expanding and contracting on demand for specific tasks, and which is not "memory" but feels like it.

And the only solution to playing better or faster is one word: practice.

Actually, the alcohol in wine gives it more of an anesthetic effect on the brain than a nutritional one! Just sayin

santamacx
07-13-2011, 02:38 PM
the same thing happened to me in the very beginning. My hands are actually very small, which in turn isn't the best thing ever (prevents me from learning songs like Just dance, etc.) Try using just your middle finger for the c, while at the same time use put your pointer one fret behind your middle. Then when you switch, the change is not as hard.

diego
07-13-2011, 03:37 PM
Neuropathways are real, positive feedback loops etc etc. I also use an index finger barre with a middle finger on the 2nd string 3d fret for the Gmaj.

OldePhart
07-13-2011, 04:01 PM
Actually, the alcohol in wine gives it more of an anesthetic effect on the brain than a nutritional one! Just sayin

BWAAA-HAAAA. So very succinct, and so well put; I tip my hat.

NYG010
07-13-2011, 08:33 PM
GreatGazukes,

Please don't allow the pedantry of a few to diminish your enjoyment of, or participation in, the forums. I'm reasonably certain that I am not alone in finding your posts quite useful and often entertaining; much more so than the posts of some who seem to cross the border from humorous to boorish far more frequently than seems either healthy or entertaining.

John

While I agree with you, we must understand that this is (still) the internet. Lets not let our emotions get tangled in with words on a computer screen...

Brad Bordessa
07-13-2011, 08:40 PM
I can only think of one thing to add:

Hold the chord you are having trouble with as you normally would. It sounds like G is your problem so try G (there are a couple cheat ways of playing G, but I think the extra effort for the normal version is worth it - it sounds way better). Take one finger at a time and repeatedly lift it up and place it back down on the string while still holding the chord. Do the same thing with the rest of the remaining fingers, one at a time - lift, set down, lift, set down. I found that this helped me learn the chord shapes and plant them firmly into my head. Don't remember who showed me that trick.

mm stan
07-13-2011, 09:54 PM
All I can say is to play about an hour after you awake..your mind is rested and clear from too many things.. you will see the difference in memory and how you retain things and creativity at it's best.

ichadwick
07-14-2011, 01:03 AM
Ian, I don't really have a breadth of musical talent that I can offer this forum, and I admit to being pleased when an occasion arises wherby I can offer a bit of knowledge that I have taken some effort to gain and memorise. Such a rejoinder as that quoted above diminishes my comfort to be an active participant in the UU.
??? Not sure how that insulted you. Not intended. I merely asked how water - which lacks nutrients - can feed a brain, and suggested that something with natural sugars might work better. Just doesn't seem obvious to me. If you can please provide the explanation on how plain water feeds the brain, we will all be enlightened.

Huna
07-14-2011, 01:56 AM
Well I like to look at it more holistically. Mind and Body are not two the way I look at things. sort of like a headlight is part of a car and so are the tires. Its the whole unit that works together to be a car. Same thing with ukulele playing or anything else. But there is a term called Mind to Muscle which means basically get it in there so the unconscious does it or its as if the muscle does it itself. Thats what we work to so its easier. Very simple really. People call it muscle memory. There are brain cells all over and not just in the head... everything is connected.

PhilUSAFRet
07-14-2011, 04:32 AM
I have a good understanding of the neurophysiology of it all, but I just accept the fact that the more you do it the easer it becomes to do it! Keep on uking!

GreatGazukes
07-14-2011, 07:11 AM
??? Not sure how that insulted you. Not intended. I merely asked how water - which lacks nutrients - can feed a brain, and suggested that something with natural sugars might work better. Just doesn't seem obvious to me. If you can please provide the explanation on how plain water feeds the brain, we will all be enlightened.

Oh, I wasn't insulted Ian, and I took pains to assume that you were being nothing more than capricously malicious by your pharseology. I actually harboured a suspicion you are aspergic, and I felt that advising you how your comments affected me may be of use so that you could reflect on their consequences.

But I have digressed, as to the erroneous statement of yours that I said "water....can feed a brain", I actually said "and drink some water, a starved brain does not function well", having referred to my OED, starve does mean to cause suffering for lack of something needed. Has this been of enlightenment for you?

It was really very silly of me to have tried to give the OP some information in a layman's terms that may be of benefit to him and steer him away from ideas of muscle memory, and appreciate the functioning of the brain. I just thought a full explanation of the syanaptic processes was unnecessary.

And please what ever could you possibly think comes out of my fawcetts?? Chokito Bars???

OldePhart
07-14-2011, 07:35 AM
While I agree with you, we must understand that this is (still) the internet. Lets not let our emotions get tangled in with words on a computer screen...

Huh? My post was about as unemotional as it gets... I don't really have a dog in this hunt; I was just pointing out to one member that he shouldn't let the antics of another dictate his enjoyment, or lack thereof, of our community. :)

John

NYG010
07-16-2011, 06:22 AM
Huh? My post was about as unemotional as it gets... I don't really have a dog in this hunt; I was just pointing out to one member that he shouldn't let the antics of another dictate his enjoyment, or lack thereof, of our community. :)

John

Sorry for mixing you in buddy. I probably just quoted you by mistake my reply was to the thread in general. Just saying :)

ichadwick
07-16-2011, 11:42 AM
...I actually harboured a suspicion you are aspergic... And please what ever could you possibly think comes out of my fawcetts?? Chokito Bars???
I've been accused of being cynical, pedantic, supercilious, presumptuous, imperious, high-handed, arrogant, sarcastic, blowhard and a wiseacre - among others - but never aspergic before. But they are all editorial comments, while yours is a medical diagnosis, one made without benefit of a formal consultation. As a politician and former newspaper editor, I am accustomed to the former. I am not accustomed to the latter without at least being a patient. Am I to be billed for this pleasure? ;)

You are correct, starve has various meanings, but when referring to physiology or used intransitively, without an object (such as 'starved of oxygen' or 'starved for affection'), it is usual to intend it to mean 'to suffer or die from extreme or prolonged lack of food' rather than a general sense of deprivation. And it was in that sense I read it. When a child complains, "I'm starving" it is custom to understand the child is hungry, not deprived of, say, TV hours, or Wii time, or even a lack of sugary soda pop.

To be bereft of hydration is usually referred to as 'thirsty' (which, too, has a variety of synonyms), the resolution to which is water or other suitable liquids. When I feel the urge for a beer or glass of wine - or even a shot of tequila - I say I am thirsty, not I am starved. So if you meant starved in such an unexpected but linguistically acceptable-albeit-prone-to-misinterpretation definition, I apologize for my questions to which you took umbrage.

As for what comes out of your faucet, I cannot conjecture, but in general, urban tap water may contain water plus a variety of minerals, chemical compounds (some of which are organic), several contaminants such as pesticides and farming-industry chemicals, and even microorganisms. Liquefied chlorine is commonly used in municipal water systems, but fluorosilicic acid, aluminium sulphate, calcium hydroxide and sodium silicofluoride may also be used. None of these are generally accepted as nutritious, in the sense of providing food or anything that mitigates a "starved brain" if by which you meant hungry. However, if you meant his brain could be starved of fluoride, then you would, of course, be correct in your usage.

My own tap water, based on recent analysis by both the province and local water authority, contains merely H2O with such a minute amount of other elements as to be negligible and well below any threshold for attention. It is as pure any any municipal water can be. I consider it refreshing, but not, in the sense of the word I use, nutritious. Again, I apologize if it seemed our non-mutual understanding of that term seemed at loggerheads.

Chokito bars? They are not available in any Canadian confectionery, at least to my knowledge. However, since I do not consume candy bars, nor do I normally even browse the candy counters looking for high-caloric white-sugar comestibles of dubious benefit to health and which promote tooth decay, I cannot say for certain. But I did grasp the general concept.

:D

PhilUSAFRet
07-16-2011, 11:58 AM
Probably a good time to disengage from this post!

Hippie Dribble
07-16-2011, 03:35 PM
NYG...my answer to your question really involves practice. The more you do it, the quicker your chord changes will become. It's as simple and difficult as that, really. Don't be too hard on yourself and try not to be impatient. Things will click into place but give it time.

There is a member here who displays a recurrent pattern of behaviour that is offensive to many. This person apparently takes delight in undermining other people. Examples are numerous and frequent. I believe this behaviour should have been dealt with long ago. If I am sanctioned for this comment, so be it. I do share the view that it is such people who destroy the morale of this wonderful community. Really, how much is enough?

To GreatGazukes, I appreciate your original answer. It was helpful to me.

Huna
07-16-2011, 03:54 PM
where can us bad guys hang out then Eugene? I didn't enter the saint contest.. :(

Hippie Dribble
07-16-2011, 04:02 PM
The number of sins I commit each day would be enough to condemn me to hell a thousand times over. That's not my point. Be bad as you wanna. Nastiness masquerading as intellect at other people's expense on a public forum don't work for me.

diego
07-16-2011, 04:16 PM
Wow guys, let's not spoil the fun. More uke talk, less derailing of the thread.

I have an academic degree in biology and the muscle memory thing is true. But all in all it comes down to the old adage (sp? no academic degree in english :) ) practice makes perfect. Train train train, I picked up chords easily because I had muscle memory built up from years of guitar playing.

Huna
07-16-2011, 05:11 PM
well I am working on a song myself, memorizing it and the muscle memory is in the prior chord linking to the next

Huna
07-16-2011, 05:15 PM
try memorizing this one lol:

http://www.ukuleleboudoir.com/fr/article/detail/279/Almost-like-Being-In-love


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nmSRTjwRmM&feature=player_embedded


tab:

http://www.ukuleleboudoir.com/site/tabs/almost_like_being_in_love/almost_like_being_in_love.pdf


http://www.lyricsfreak.com/f/frank+sinatra/almost+like+being+in+love_20055778.html

wolfybau
07-17-2011, 03:02 AM
All I can say is to play about an hour after you awake..your mind is rested and clear from too many things.. you will see the difference in memory and how you retain things and creativity at it's best.

thats a realy great tip Stan! I've not heard that one before. I keep my uke near or in my bed lol so my morning often starts with a song. :)

brans, neurons, muscles all good. But in this thread I have not realy seen the posters original problem addressed - fat fingers. And also tendons/flexibility

I taught guitar for many years, and people of all sizes and skills.
Some of my students has a real struggle with this one. Their fingertips being literaly too wide to fit between the strings when a string in between them was placed on a fret. Chords in particular like the center finger of the G form(D on a guitar)

some suggestions.

study where between the strings you are placing. generaly the problem comes when the meaty backside of the finger tip touches. Try to get you fingernal as close to the string infront of it as possible thereby giving room to the back.

also vitaly important , playing on your fingertips and curling your fingers. this is where the flexibility part comes in.
when I say fingertip I mean right behind the fingernail. Pressing with this part, if you look at the backside of the finger , will compress that area and lift it and also make room for the string behind the finger. to do this you will realy have to 'curl' you fingers over a lot, so knuckle stretching is a big help. do this by curling up your fingers and squeezing your curled fingers with your other hand giving a good stretch to the first joint especialy. Dont just do this during practice , but through out your day. I have read recently for a strech to be effect you have to hold it for 30 seconds. i dont know if that is true.

For people with realy large hands , you may have to take more extreme messures like buying an insument wth as wide a neck as possible (nice excuse togo uke shopping eh? ;) ) Look for one with low action. The lower the strings the less likely they are to make contact with the back of your finger. If you have high action on the instrument you are using now this could be a factor.

and for those realy desparate you can try wearing medical tape around the tips of your fingers (not to tight!) to try to slenderise them a bit (like a finger girdle) over time it can make a slight difference , but in the case of string clearnces, sometimes a little can be a lot.

I hope these tips are helpful. Best of luck

ichadwick
07-17-2011, 04:57 AM
An interesting piece in Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muscle_memory) on "muscle memory" includes this:

The retention of motor skills, now referred to as muscle memory, also began to be of great interest in the early 1900s. Most motor skills are thought to be acquired through practice; however, mere observation of the skill has led to learning as well.[4] Research suggests we do not start off with a blank slate with regard to motor memory although we do learn most of our motor memory repertoire during our lifetime.[5] Movements such as facial expressions, which are thought to be learned, can actually be observed in children who are blind; thus there is some evidence for motor memory being genetically pre-wired.[5]

In the early stages of empirical research of motor memory Edward Thorndike, a leading pioneer in the study of motor memory, was among the first to acknowledge learning can occur without conscious awareness.[6] One of the earliest and most notable studies regarding the retention of motor skills was by Hill, Rejall, and Thorndike, who showed savings in relearning typing skills after a 25 year period with no practice.[2] Findings related to the retention of learned motor skills have been continuously replicated in studies, suggesting that through subsequent practice, motor learning is stored in the brain as memory. This is why performing skills such as riding a bike or driving a car are effortlessly and ‘unconsciously’ executed, even if someone had not performed these skills in a long period of time.

Motor behavior

When first learning a motor task, movement is often slow, stiff and easily disrupted without attention. With practice, execution of motor task becomes smoother, there is a decrease in limb stiffness, and muscle activity necessary to the task is performed without conscious effort.[7]

Muscle memory encoding

The neuroanatomy of memory is widespread throughout the brain; however, the pathways important to motor memory are separate from the medial temporal lobe pathways associated with declarative memory.[8] As with declarative memory, motor memory is theorized to have two stages: a short-term memory encoding stage, which is fragile and susceptible to damage, and a long-term memory consolidation stage, which is more stable.[9]

The memory encoding stage is often referred to as motor learning, and requires an increase in brain activity in motor areas as well as an increase in attention. Brain areas active during motor learning include the motor and somatosensory cortices; however, these areas of activation decrease once the motor skill is learned. The prefrontal and frontal cortices are also active during this stage due to the need for increased attention on the task being learned.[7]

The main area involved in motor learning is the cerebellum. Some models of cerebellar-dependent motor learning, in particular the Marr-Albus model, propose a single plasticity mechanism involving the cerebellar long-term depression(LTD) of the parallel fiber synapses onto Purkinje cells. These modification in synapse activity would mediate motor input with motor outputs critical to inducing motor learning.[10] However, conflicting evidence suggests that a single plasticity mechanism is not sufficient and a multiple plasticity mechanism is needed to account for the storage of motor memories over time. Regardless of the mechanism, studies of cerebellar-dependent motor tasks show that cerebral cortical plasticity is crucial for motor learning, even if not necessarily for storage.[11]

The basal ganglia also play an important role in memory and learning, in particular in reference to stimulus-response associations and the formation of habits. The basal ganglia-cerebellar connections are thought to increase with time when learning a motor task.[12]

Muscle memory consolidation

Muscle memory consolidation involves the continuous evolution of neural processes after practicing a task has stopped. The exact mechanism of motor memory consolidation within the brain is controversial; however, most theories assume that there is a general redistribution of information across the brain from encoding to consolidation. Hebb's rule states that “synaptic connectivity changes as a function of repetitive firing.” In this case, that would mean that the high amount of stimulation coming from practicing a movement would cause the repetition of firing in certain motor networks; presumably leading to an increase in the efficiency of exciting these motor networks over time.[11]

Though the exact location of muscle memory storage is not known, studies have suggested that it is the inter-regional connections that play the most important role in advancing motor memory encoding to consolidation, rather than decreases in overall regional activity. These studies have shown a weakened connection from the cerebellum to the primary motor area with practice, it is presumed because of a decreased need for error correction from the cerebellum. However, the connection between the basal ganglia and the primary motor area is strengthened, suggesting the basal ganglia plays an important role in the motor memory consolidation process.[11]

scottie
07-17-2011, 06:08 AM
The term "muscle memory" is a bit of a misnomer, it's really a body memory that develops as neural pathways are used repeatedly. Regular practice is the only thing that'll make this happen. . . and one should practice slowly and accurately to reinforce the correct movements and timings. Practicing without looking at the hands also helps in feeling where the fingers are supposed to be and, in the case of large position changes, the hands and arms. You'll put it together, just practice most every day. A little every day is better than a lot once a week. Someone, I can't remember who, said "An eight hour practice day is not the same as an eight hour practice week."

I like to practice in the morning. If I'm working on something that I'm having problems with practice before bed seems to work well, probably because it's the last thing I'm thinking about before la la land and I think I retain more.

NYG010
07-17-2011, 10:25 PM
Thanks for your help guys. I think its time to bury this thread, I was just out looking to get some good details (which some of you have so kindly done for me!) Unfortunately it turned into a drama. As for the others, lets take a breath and relax- again your getting frustrated over words on a computer screen, were all here for the same reasons (sharing knowledge and having some fun!). Let's not have our emotions get the best of us...

Lanark
07-18-2011, 04:17 AM
Ignoring all that has come before...

What I tend to do is play a C5 (0033) (at least I think that's what it may be properly called) with the ring finger for all my C chord needs. It rings as a C (GCGC) and it's very easy from there to flip up the fingers into a G since the ring finger is already there on the third fret where it needs to be. It's a nice shortcut for fast changes.