PDA

View Full Version : My Disbility and Ukuleles



joeybug
07-13-2011, 11:54 PM
Hey Everyone :D

Firstly, I don't have a video for the DU, so I won't post again until I have one of my own or from someone else!

I was talking with some UU members and they suggested I post this thread about Ukulele playing and having a disability (either a visible or invisible one).

As the majority of you know, I have a few conditions that limit my life and my Ukulele playing. I'm 29 and use a wheelchair 95% of the time, I have been playing Ukulele for about 10 1/2 months (started 31st August 2010) and have learnt many things, both about the Ukulele and what I need to overcome in order to be the best player I can be - not talking about becoming the next Jake, because I know that's not possibly, but basically just being the best I KNOW I can be :D

So, what have I learnt? Well, firstly that I'll always need a strap to play for a period of time, I can usually manage a few minutes without one and then the Ukulele becomes to heavy and my arms are tired and sore, so I use an Uke Leash (which I love, thanks Lori!) and that's enabled me to play and practise for my 30 + mins a day. I've also learnt that even though I can stand and walk a bit, I can't do that with an Ukulele, I have to focus too much on staying upright that I just can't do it while holding one of my prized possessions!

I've also learnt that joining an existing Ukulele club is damn near impossible, I looked into it and they told me they didn't always (or at all really) use disabled friendly venues and it would be hard to limit themselves to that when they had so many people happy with the venues anyway, I understood, so I looked into starting my own group and have four members (including myself) but am struggling to find a venue that is both disabled accessible and doesn't mind having some Ukulele players there one evening. As much as I want to succeed and play with a group, it's costing me $24 a month to run the site and we've not been able to have a meet up other than putting it at my own house (which is obviously accessible) and people aren't really that happy about doing that (for obvious reasons) so I'm thinking I'll have to let that dream die for now and maybe one day I'll get to "Jam"

I've also learnt that an Ukulele will brighten even the worst pain days, just being able to sturm some chords is enough to bring a smile to my face and I love it :D UU is a great place and I have made so many friends here that I wouldn't give up without a fight!

Anyway, I know there are other disabled Ukers on UU (we have a group too!) so if you want to chime in with what you've learnt while Uke'in feel free!

Have a great day!

Joey

P.S Keep :music:

Tudorp
07-14-2011, 12:48 AM
Well... Ya know I have issues too bug. I was a very competent bass/guitar player in the day that disability took from me. I learned several years ago that I could still play music through the ukulele though. I still play guitar every so often, but with my limitations, just not happy with the results. But again, the uke fills that need for me. What gives me inspirations, is a couple people I have seen on youtube. One guy has very deformed arms, and plays the uke as it sits on it's back in his lap. And he is very good. Non one can tell me ya can't play because of disability.

harpdog cc
07-14-2011, 12:59 AM
Hang in there J-Bug. I wonder what type of meeting places aren't accessible? Other than that, and my ignorance may show here, I suppose most coffee houses are accessible, and there are a number of them that would like a club to meet on their non busy nights. The group I've been going to meets in one such place, and they give us the back half of the seating area. They manage to sell us a few meals and a good number of drinks, which is better than nothing for them on a Thursday evening. Another idea is a meeting room at the local library.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 01:08 AM
Well... Ya know I have issues too bug. I was a very competent bass/guitar player in the day that disability took from me. I learned several years ago that I could still play music through the ukulele though. I still play guitar every so often, but with my limitations, just not happy with the results. But again, the uke fills that need for me. What gives me inspirations, is a couple people I have seen on youtube. One guy has very deformed arms, and plays the uke as it sits on it's back in his lap. And he is very good. Non one can tell me ya can't play because of disability.

Oh, I wasn't trying to say you "can't" play because of a disability..sorry if it came off like that


Hang in there J-Bug. I wonder what type of meeting places aren't accessible? Other than that, and my ignorance may show here, I suppose most coffee houses are accessible, and there are a number of them that would like a club to meet on their non busy nights. The group I've been going to meets in one such place, and they give us the back half of the seating area. They manage to sell us a few meals and a good number of drinks, which is better than nothing for them on a Thursday evening. Another idea is a meeting room at the local library.

Might see if the local Starbucks will allow us to play one evening or something..or the local library, thanks for the ideas! :D

fitncrafty
07-14-2011, 01:19 AM
Joey..Glad that you have found the ukulele and have found some joy and happiness in life. It's a lot to bear for sure. It's the little things that make life worth living most days...

Keep on strumming my friend!

austin1
07-14-2011, 01:32 AM
have you thought about meeting outside, at a local park or something? It only works as long as the weather is good, but you'll at least be able to meet and jam while you look for an indoor venue.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 01:44 AM
have you thought about meeting outside, at a local park or something? It only works as long as the weather is good, but you'll at least be able to meet and jam while you look for an indoor venue.

Thanks for the tip! Gonna try our local library and starbucks and see if we can find an inside venue, and if not then maybe we could meet in the local park!

kevsumac
07-14-2011, 02:35 AM
Keep on rockin Jbug! Was going to suggest outside but Austin beat me to it.

Kem
07-14-2011, 02:44 AM
I have mild cerebral palsy and a slightly crippled right hand (when I was a baby, my right arm was almost completely paralysed). In the last couple of years, I have also developed joint pain in my hands. I just don't have much luck with hands, I guess. Throughout my life, I have struggled with playing instruments up to speed. I love music but just can't play that quickly with my right hand (or even my left, thanks to the CP), and I have to admit to feeling a certain envy when I listen to people going "tweedleedleedleedleedle" effortlessly. Since I like picking when I play the uke, I often find myself running up against my speed limit. The added pain from the whole joint issue doesn't help either, but it's the lack of speed and coordination that bothers me the most.

When I was a teenager, my mother made the mistake of telling my flute teacher about the cerebral palsy. The teacher started asking me all these questions and assuring me that I could still be QUITE good at the flute if I only worked very, very hard at it. Before that point, I hadn't really thought of myself as disabled, but the teacher made it clear that she was now putting me and her non-disabled students in different categories. Hurrah.

Joeybug: I second the "park" suggestion. You might also try community centres or even pubs.

roxhum
07-14-2011, 02:47 AM
Hi Joey, I admire your positive attitude and how you just keep on truckin' through your obstacles. And, again as a side note my uke group meets in a music store and everyone in the group pays a few bucks toward the cost of the space. It makes me very sad to hear that you are limited not because of having enough people to form a group but because you are unable to access the meeting space. It is wrong Joey, and again I admire your attitude. I hope you don't have to give up your uke group.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 02:56 AM
I have mild cerebral palsy and a slightly crippled right hand (when I was a baby, my right arm was almost completely paralysed). In the last couple of years, I have also developed joint pain in my hands. I just don't have much luck with hands, I guess. Throughout my life, I have struggled with playing instruments up to speed. I love music but just can't play that quickly with my right hand (or even my left, thanks to the CP), and I have to admit to feeling a certain envy when I listen to people going "tweedleedleedleedleedle" effortlessly. Since I like picking when I play the uke, I often find myself running up against my speed limit. The added pain from the whole joint issue doesn't help either, but it's the lack of speed and coordination that bothers me the most.

When I was a teenager, my mother made the mistake of telling my flute teacher about the cerebral palsy. The teacher started asking me all these questions and assuring me that I could still be QUITE good at the flute if I only worked very, very hard at it. Before that point, I hadn't really thought of myself as disabled, but the teacher made it clear that she was now putting me and her non-disabled students in different categories. Hurrah.

Joeybug: I second the "park" suggestion. You might also try community centres or even pubs.

I, like you, never thought of myself as "disabled" even though this has been my life for many years, it wasn't until I needed a wheelchair that I really took on that label, and even then with difficulty, it's not right that you were seem as "different" because of your disability which had nothing to do with your skill as a flute player.

I'm glad the Uke is something you have access to, it really has opened up my eyes as to music, which I loved playing as a kid/teenager but then my lung function declined (I'm an Oboe player or at least was) and I couldn't anymore and was told I couldn't take lessons because they didn't want the responsibility of taking on a "disadvantaged player"

Glad you can finger pick, do you have a YouTube? Would love to see/hear some of your playing and subscribe... :D


Hi Joey, I admire your positive attitude and how you just keep on truckin' through your obstacles. And, again as a side note my uke group meets in a music store and everyone in the group pays a few bucks toward the cost of the space. It makes me very sad to hear that you are limited not because of having enough people to form a group but because you are unable to access the meeting space. It is wrong Joey, and again I admire your attitude. I hope you don't have to give up your uke group.

I've found a local park that will let us play there, so have now got a meeting place, just need somewhere for bad weather days, hoping people will now come to the first meet up as it's no longer in a private residence and hopefully that'll mean I can continue, see no point if we're not actually doing anything! I know it's wrong, but it's also a fact of life that not everything or everyone or everywhere will accommodate for disabilities and so you just have to accept these things sometimes, doesn't mean it's right, doesn't mean it doesn't upset, doesn't mean it shouldn't be changed, but it's one group in one town, if they don't want me to play with them, not much I can do about it, so I might as well have something positive out of it all :D

Hippie Dribble
07-14-2011, 03:03 AM
Hey Joey,

my first question was why is it a problem for you and your friends to meet at your place? To me it seems like an obvious choice, but you mentioned that this was clearly not an option. Just wondering why?

I'm an insulin dependent diabetic and have been nearly 26 years. Many struggles health wise which are accelerating as I age, but like you Joey, the uke is my muse, my solace and my lifeline. It's a distraction from wearisome self-indulgence and lifts me up when I'm stuck in a dark place. I have had this conversation with my mother several times...there is no-one happier on the planet that I have fallen in love with the ukulele than she. With my history of chronic depression and drug addiction, she is convinced, as I am, that I would be dead were it not for this humble little instrument. It is a source of constant wonder and joy that occupies my mind for hours each day. I owe much to it. I can honestly say that I am never happier than when playing my ukes. People see it on my face and notice the alteration in my moods before and after. It really does mean that much to me.

All the best with getting your uke group off the ground mate.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 03:10 AM
Hey Joey,

my first question was why is it a problem for you and your friends to meet at your place? To me it seems like an obvious choice, but you mentioned that this was clearly not an option. Just wondering why?
All the best with getting your uke group off the ground mate.

People aren't happy to come to a stranger they've never met before and in their house without the knowledge that I'm not some loony, we tried meeting at my house and no one felt happy about the venue enough to want to come, so the park is set for the next one and hopefully, a public, well lit place with other people will make people happier about venturing out to a meet up...

Oh, and I agree, the Ukulele has saved my life in many different ways many different times, it's such a great instrument!

UncleElvis
07-14-2011, 03:31 AM
People aren't happy to come to a stranger they've never met before and in their house without the knowledge that I'm not some loony, we tried meeting at my house and no one felt happy about the venue enough to want to come, so the park is set for the next one and hopefully, a public, well lit place with other people will make people happier about venturing out to a meet up...

Oh, and I agree, the Ukulele has saved my life in many different ways many different times, it's such a great instrument!

I think we can safely say that you ARE, in fact, a loony! You play ukulele! It's a prerequisite!

Joking aside, thanks for this thread, and all the other stuff that you do. You inspire me.

Tudorp
07-14-2011, 03:48 AM
No, I know you wern't saying that JBug my Brudette... I just chimed in because I share some of the same issues you do, and disabilities can make things more difficult, but, that I know of some of the hardships that come with it. It's inner strength and resourcefulness that keeps us in the game. You started your own group, because another couldn't accomidate ya. That is what I am talking about. It's the perserverance that keeps us happy and living life.. ;)

Kem
07-14-2011, 03:48 AM
I, like you, never thought of myself as "disabled" even though this has been my life for many years, it wasn't until I needed a wheelchair that I really took on that label, and even then with difficulty, it's not right that you were seem as "different" because of your disability which had nothing to do with your skill as a flute player.

I'm glad the Uke is something you have access to, it really has opened up my eyes as to music, which I loved playing as a kid/teenager but then my lung function declined (I'm an Oboe player or at least was) and I couldn't anymore and was told I couldn't take lessons because they didn't want the responsibility of taking on a "disadvantaged player"

Glad you can finger pick, do you have a YouTube? Would love to see/hear some of your playing and subscribe... :D



I've found a local park that will let us play there, so have now got a meeting place, just need somewhere for bad weather days, hoping people will now come to the first meet up as it's no longer in a private residence and hopefully that'll mean I can continue, see no point if we're not actually doing anything! I know it's wrong, but it's also a fact of life that not everything or everyone or everywhere will accommodate for disabilities and so you just have to accept these things sometimes, doesn't mean it's right, doesn't mean it doesn't upset, doesn't mean it shouldn't be changed, but it's one group in one town, if they don't want me to play with them, not much I can do about it, so I might as well have something positive out of it all :D

I don't have a YouTube channel, but here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/274270-pineapple-improv) a recording of me noodling on my concert pineapple. It's an improvisation, so there are some icky bits and hesitations, but oh well. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/285056-gourd-banjolele-improv) me noodling on my gourd banjo uke. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/406230-mango-lanakai-noodling) one on yet another ukulele (somewhat similar to the first one in some of the noodles). Perhaps someday I'll make a recording of an actual song and not just me fooling around.

Regarding accessibility: it can occasionally be a big issue in Toronto. An old movie theatre was demolished several years ago because it couldn't afford the alterations that would make it accessible. It was a perfectly good movie theatre otherwise, but not everyone could get at it. (While it was being demolished, it collapsed and killed a guy in the building next door, but that's another story.) I understand why the uke group wouldn't want to change for one person, but it still has the effect of excluding that one person, and it's therefore discriminatory and too bad.

Huna
07-14-2011, 04:32 AM
I think the ukulele is the best disability instrument for me. I brought my uke with me to get my hip replacement and played it in my room. I can play it in my easy chair as I am recovering. I love the size of them for portability.

Mandarb
07-14-2011, 04:52 AM
Thanks for sharing. Nice to hear the stories from people overcoming various obstacles - very inspiring. Thank you.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 04:58 AM
I don't have a YouTube channel, but here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/274270-pineapple-improv) a recording of me noodling on my concert pineapple. It's an improvisation, so there are some icky bits and hesitations, but oh well. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/285056-gourd-banjolele-improv) me noodling on my gourd banjo uke. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/406230-mango-lanakai-noodling) one on yet another ukulele (somewhat similar to the first one in some of the noodles). Perhaps someday I'll make a recording of an actual song and not just me fooling around.

Regarding accessibility: it can occasionally be a big issue in Toronto. An old movie theatre was demolished several years ago because it couldn't afford the alterations that would make it accessible. It was a perfectly good movie theatre otherwise, but not everyone could get at it. (While it was being demolished, it collapsed and killed a guy in the building next door, but that's another story.) I understand why the uke group wouldn't want to change for one person, but it still has the effect of excluding that one person, and it's therefore discriminatory and too bad.

Wow, your playing is beautiful! And I'm not just saying that, I mean it, I love the Pineapple improv :D

janeray1940
07-14-2011, 05:01 AM
Joeybug, that's so unfortunate that you can't easily find a place to meet that is wheelchair-accessible. I hope you find a solution to this soon.

I don't talk about it much, but I probably should do so more in order to raise awareness. I have a rare "invisible illness" called hyperaldosteronism (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000330.htm). You would have no idea by looking at me, but it affects just about every area of my life. A big part of it is food - either directly or indirectly, because of the illness there are a bazillion things that I can't eat. This might be just about the most frustrating thing about this illness, because it comes up just about every single day. A simple "no thank you" never suffices - people always want to know why I can't eat such and such, or why I don't want to join them for dessert, or whatever. I've been dealing with this for a quarter of my life and still don't know how to handle it elegantly.

An aspect of the illness is that my potassium levels are difficult to control. This is the one thing about the disease that impacts my ukulele playing - when my potassium gets too low, sometimes my left hand just decides to stop working well and I either have to just slow down, play something less complex, or just stop entirely (because I don't think it's good to practice when all I'm doing is making mistakes over and over).

I have to agree with what others have said about the healing powers of the ukulele though (ad of music in general). I've had a pretty difficult last couple of years, but through some amazing force of nature, the ukulele came to me right when the illness was at its worst. I've had that lovely distraction to get me through it, and really, I'm not sure what I would have done without it!

Kem
07-14-2011, 05:08 AM
Wow, your playing is beautiful! And I'm not just saying that, I mean it, I love the Pineapple improv :D

Thanks. I am fond of that particular ukulele; it always makes me want to play tinkly music.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 05:08 AM
Joeybug, that's so unfortunate that you can't easily find a place to meet that is wheelchair-accessible. I hope you find a solution to this soon.

I don't talk about it much, but I probably should do so more in order to raise awareness. I have a rare "invisible illness" called hyperaldosteronism (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000330.htm). You would have no idea by looking at me, but it affects just about every area of my life. A big part of it is food - either directly or indirectly, because of the illness there are a bazillion things that I can't eat. This might be just about the most frustrating thing about this illness, because it comes up just about every single day. A simple "no thank you" never suffices - people always want to know why I can't eat such and such, or why I don't want to join them for dessert, or whatever. I've been dealing with this for a quarter of my life and still don't know how to handle it elegantly.

An aspect of the illness is that my potassium levels are difficult to control. This is the one thing about the disease that impacts my ukulele playing - when my potassium gets too low, sometimes my left hand just decides to stop working well and I either have to just slow down, play something less complex, or just stop entirely (because I don't think it's good to practice when all I'm doing is making mistakes over and over).

I have to agree with what others have said about the healing powers of the ukulele though (ad of music in general). I've had a pretty difficult last couple of years, but through some amazing force of nature, the ukulele came to me right when the illness was at its worst. I've had that lovely distraction to get me through it, and really, I'm not sure what I would have done without it!

I can only imagine how hard that must be for you, I have many food/drug allergies, but people around me know about them and it's not something I ever have to explain so I can't imagine what it must be like for you. I get cramps in my hands from the Fibro if I try to play for too long, so again only have a small idea what it must be like for you with the potassium probs, but I do agree that the Uke is something that reaches across those boundaries and allows us to "shrug off" our labels and just play :D

joeybug
07-14-2011, 05:09 AM
Thanks. I am fond of that particular ukulele; it always makes me want to play tinkly music.

I've followed you because I loved all three, they're just beautiful, something I could listen to over and over, love Uke music :D

Ataraxia
07-14-2011, 05:37 AM
I'm really happy that ukulele has done so much to make your days better! It certainly is a fun and wonderful instrument. I wish you the best on finding some venues for your club! My mother has had severe disabilities for most of her adult life, but she managed to teach me the importance of remaining positive through all of life's many challenges. I admire your determination and spirit, I wish that I could become more motivated in my life as well. I must have a thousand songs that are only half-written.

I wish you the best of luck with everything! Stay positive and you will get more venues and become the best ukulele player that you can be!

janeray1940
07-14-2011, 05:38 AM
I don't have a YouTube channel, but here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/274270-pineapple-improv) a recording of me noodling on my concert pineapple. It's an improvisation, so there are some icky bits and hesitations, but oh well. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/285056-gourd-banjolele-improv) me noodling on my gourd banjo uke. And here's (http://audioboo.fm/boos/406230-mango-lanakai-noodling) one on yet another ukulele (somewhat similar to the first one in some of the noodles). Perhaps someday I'll make a recording of an actual song and not just me fooling around.

Those were all so nice! People who can improvise absolutely amaze me.

Lori
07-14-2011, 05:40 AM
Two of my uke groups use a church as a meeting place. One uses the main gathering area (on Saturday morning), and the other uses a smaller meeting room (Thursday night). It is not unusual to collect a fee to cover the cost of the venue. Maybe you can see if there is a wheelchair-friendly church that would be willing to host your group.
Best of luck!
–Lori

joeybug
07-14-2011, 05:41 AM
I wish you the best of luck with everything! Stay positive and you will get more venues and become the best ukulele player that you can be!

That's what I aim for, not to be perfect, just to be the best *I* can be

joeybug
07-14-2011, 05:41 AM
Two of my uke groups use a church as a meeting place. One uses the main gathering area (on Saturday morning), and the other uses a smaller meeting room (Thursday night). It is not unusual to collect a fee to cover the cost of the venue. Maybe you can see if there is a wheelchair-friendly church that would be willing to host your group.
Best of luck!
–Lori

Thanks for the advice, Lori! I'll have to look into it, hopefully they'll be some wheelchair friendly churches around :D

bbqribs
07-14-2011, 06:02 AM
ok, I'll stop feeling sorry for myself. (incinerated marriage>divorce)

joeybug
07-14-2011, 06:08 AM
ok, I'll stop feeling sorry for myself. (incinerated marriage>divorce)

It wasn't my intention to make people feel bad, or think they don't have worries of their own, everyone has their own mountain to climb and you should never compare yours to anyones because your difficulties are just as valid.

bbqribs
07-14-2011, 06:35 AM
Oh yes, JB, I know that you are a most positive person! :) Good luck on your quest!

DAPuke
07-14-2011, 06:43 AM
Thanks for sharing your situation. You, Ms J.Bug are an inspiration. I hope you can get your jam happening.
Don

mds725
07-14-2011, 07:36 AM
Hi Joey,

Thanks for the inspiration! The way you push through your health issues to be the best you can be has been an inspiration to me, not only with ukulele playing but in dealing with obstacles of all kinds. You remind me that what matters is not how far you've gone but how far you've come; not where you end up but how far you traveled to get there. You also remind me to be grateful for the things I can do rather than bitter about the things I can't.

I was also going to suggest having your ukulele group meet at a church -- my ukulele class meets at one on a rotating basis for some of its monthly Saturday workshops -- but Lori beat me to it.

molokinirum
07-14-2011, 07:44 AM
J Bug...you are a true inspiration to everyone!!!! Keep at it, you know you can do it!!!

joeybug
07-14-2011, 08:28 AM
Oh yes, JB, I know that you are a most positive person! :) Good luck on your quest!


Thanks for sharing your situation. You, Ms J.Bug are an inspiration. I hope you can get your jam happening.
Don


Hi Joey,

Thanks for the inspiration! The way you push through your health issues to be the best you can be has been an inspiration to me, not only with ukulele playing but in dealing with obstacles of all kinds. You remind me that what matters is not how far you've gone but how far you've come; not where you end up but how far you traveled to get there. You also remind me to be grateful for the things I can do rather than bitter about the things I can't.

I was also going to suggest having your ukulele group meet at a church -- my ukulele class meets at one on a rotating basis for some of its monthly Saturday workshops -- but Lori beat me to it.


J Bug...you are a true inspiration to everyone!!!! Keep at it, you know you can do it!!!

Thanks everyone :D I was really nervous about posting this, and it's gone a lot better than I thought it would. Thanks for showing me UU is such a wonderful place :D

BadLands Bart
07-14-2011, 08:31 AM
WTG JoeyBug!!!! I have watched your impressive improvement playing the ukulele! Always enjoy watching your videos as well!! You are a ray of sunshine in this crazy world when we get to be friends with a person who struggles yet manages to rise to the challange! Like molokinirum said...you are a true inspiritation!!

UkuEroll
07-14-2011, 09:44 AM
I am a paraplegic from the chest down, I spend most of my playing in a reclining armchair. After playing Guitar for years, having to stop due to my condition was heart breaking for me, then I discovered the Ukulele and my musical world returned. I like Joeybug would love to jam with others but playing in my wheelchair causes too much back pain, so going to a club is out for me.
Years ago while I could still walk, I set up a guitar club, which turned into a nightmare. I put an add in the local paper and sorted out a school hall.
I arrived a little late, and when I walked in to my horror found about forty people all waiting for "me" all staring at me waiting for me to enlighten them with my teachings. All I wanted was a place to meet other players and jam, not to be a teacher! there were lots of more skillful players there but all they wanted to do was show off. It only lasted about 3 weeks as it just turned into one big noise.
So if you do set up a group, try to plan out what you want to achieve and make this clear to all who join. I'm sure people wouldn't mind coming to you! start with a few and take it from there.But if all else fails, you've always got us!!
As for access to places, I totally understand where your coming from, I've given up on eating out as even if they have access, I can't get my knees under the table.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 09:50 AM
I am a paraplegic from the chest down, I spend most of my playing in a reclining armchair. After playing Guitar for years, having to stop due to my condition was heart breaking for me, then I discovered the Ukulele and my musical world returned. I like Joeybug would love to jam with others but playing in my wheelchair causes too much back pain, so going to a club is out for me.
Years ago while I could still walk, I set up a guitar club, which turned into a nightmare. I put an add in the local paper and sorted out a school hall.
I arrived a little late, and when I walked in to my horror found about forty people all waiting for "me" all staring at me waiting for me to enlighten them with my teachings. All I wanted was a place to meet other players and jam, not to be a teacher! there were lots of more skillful players there but all they wanted to do was show off. It only lasted about 3 weeks as it just turned into one big noise.
So if you do set up a group, try to plan out what you want to achieve and make this clear to all who join. I'm sure people wouldn't mind coming to you! start with a few and take it from there.But if all else fails, you've always got us!!
As for access to places, I totally understand where your coming from, I've given up on eating out as even if they have access, I can't get my knees under the table.

I hate eating out, or even going to Starbucks, I can never "sit" at a table, they always make them too low or my wheelchair gets pushed by the legs and I can't sit facing on, ugh, drives me batty! I haven't taken out a ad, done some advertising but not got much response, we'll see, maybe one day!

robbocx
07-14-2011, 11:40 AM
Not sure how the Clubs and Pubs near you work, in Australia they have to have level access.

The Clubs also have an obligation to 'do good' for the community in some way so we hold a lot of our events at Clubs/Pubs.

We also tell people what to expect at each event it may be a workshop (Wednesdays) or a jam (Fridays) of a gig (usually weekends) so they have some idea of what they are turning up for we also have what we call, casual strums, where you can just get together for, yes you got it, a casual strum.

Good luck in getting a venue, the pubs love us uke players, as it's a win win situation.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 01:29 PM
Not sure how the Clubs and Pubs near you work, in Australia they have to have level access.

The Clubs also have an obligation to 'do good' for the community in some way so we hold a lot of our events at Clubs/Pubs.

We also tell people what to expect at each event it may be a workshop (Wednesdays) or a jam (Fridays) of a gig (usually weekends) so they have some idea of what they are turning up for we also have what we call, casual strums, where you can just get together for, yes you got it, a casual strum.

Good luck in getting a venue, the pubs love us uke players, as it's a win win situation.

They are required to be accessible by law, unless they're listed buildings and since the area where I live is very historic and pretty much the whole thing is listed buildings they can only do so much such as provide a ramp that can be removed and used when needed, either way, the ones I asked said they were either too small to accommodate a group and still have space for regulars or were unhappy at the idea of having a group of beginners making noise. Thanks for the suggestion though :D

robbocx
07-14-2011, 01:59 PM
the ones I asked said they were either too small to accommodate a group and still have space for regulars or were unhappy at the idea of having a group of beginners making noise.

When I first started ringing round for venues there was a bit of 'thanks but no thanks' from some of the venues.

Then the Aussie Arms let us use the 'Beer garden' and we had around 15 ukers and two in the audience, that was around 18 months ago, we now get around 40-50 ukers and atleast 75 -100 in the audience, in fact they now employ two extra staff at the bar on the first Saturday of the month to cover the extra crowd that the ukes bring in.

So, don't be put off, keep looking for the venue and show them how much value you can add to their business and how much joy the uke can bring to the world.

joeybug
07-14-2011, 02:03 PM
When I first started ringing round for venues there was a bit of 'thanks but no thanks' from some of the venues.

Then the Aussie Arms let us use the 'Beer garden' and we had around 15 ukers and two in the audience, that was around 18 months ago, we now get around 40-50 ukers and atleast 75 -100 in the audience, in fact they now employ two extra staff at the bar on the first Saturday of the month to cover the extra crowd that the ukes bring in.

So, don't be put off, keep looking for the venue and show them how much value you can add to their business and how much joy the uke can bring to the world.

Oh, I'm not put off, I will keep trying, but for now we're going to meet at the local park (weather permitting) and hopefully some of the other members will have some ideas..

Ukulele JJ
07-14-2011, 05:06 PM
Thanks for this thread, JB!

For several months I've been thinking about starting a club here in Nashville. For a different instrument though (not ukulele... we already have a ukulele club here).

Naturally, I've been trying to come up with possible meeting places. I gotta be honest that accessibility never crossed my mind as a criteria to consider. But now I realize that it's pretty much a must-have. Thanks!

JJ

southcoastukes
07-14-2011, 07:00 PM
Huna and Janeray touched on it - the healing powers of music. I posted an interview with Wynton Marsalis on another thread where he said of Bach: "this music will heal you if you let it".

It may heal the soul, and no doubt that can help to heal the body. There are limits, however, and at some point you need to simply accept that it may only heal the spirit. That is no small thing. Joey, I think that is what it is doing for you.

I have a daughter, now a young adult. In all but the first few weeks of her life she has been almost completely disabled. The first ukulele that I collaborated on with my partner Omar is now her ukulele. She can't see it, only hears it faintly, can't hold it, can't hold much of anything as her fingers aren't too cooperative. Yet it brings her as much joy as anything in her life.

We play together, and when I say this, I mean it is also a collaboration to play her ukulele. I hold it, walk it up to her, take her arm and reach it out to where she can feel the strings. She immediately starts to "strum" it. Not a graceful strum, but she has enough control of her fingers so as not to catch them too badly on the strings. It's not a measured rythym, but to see the way she lights up when she is "making music" is almost as much a joy to me as it is to her.

She'll pause sometimes, sometimes for a long time, as if she's thinking of what to do in the next passage. Then all of the sudden, out comes the arm again, and the smiles and giggles too.

It's sad but true - there are more options for the disabled when they are young than when they become an adult. The "special school" that provides interaction among peers is gone, and there's very little left to replace it. I'm sure the days are long when there's nothing much to do. "Music", in whatever form, can bring joy when little else can.

Joey, I can tell you understand that great ability on your instrument is not the point. You said it well:


That's what I aim for, not to be perfect, just to be the best *I* can be

When you play with that sort of understanding your spirit will stay strong and your life will be richer.

We all send you love -

mm stan
07-14-2011, 07:39 PM
Aloha Joey,
As many have said already, the healing powers of music......and the ukulele just makes you smile with happiness.. it is a good distraction for us fighting personal health issues & problems... Another
great one is the the people here on the forum and UU ...they have also been our life savers... and put them all together, it has changed alot of our perspective on all of our lives....God's Blessings...

TCK
07-14-2011, 09:33 PM
Jee Crimeny..I am dying here. On one hand I feel like an IDIOT, for being too shy or self conscious to play my Uke for people over ten. It ain't easy for me, but yeah, it is.
@ JB- you are the board cheerleader, and you have to know that- we all get something from your enthusiasm and obvious love of the Ukulele, and it inspires us in ways that you could never know. Probably seems intangible from your end of the comp. screen...but we are here, and we are waiting for your little bit of sunshine.
@Tudorp- again...what would this place be without you? You are gold mate- pure gold.
@ Kem- you make some of the most beautiful music I have ever heard, and mate, I have heard a lot of music. Bless Up my friend.
@ Eugene...ah, my muse. Know one knows what my disability is because you can't see it, but the Ukulele...it makes my little light shine too. Big ups for making that so real.
@ Dirk (at least I think that is who Southcoast Ukes is)...I am not ashamed to admit all my street cred is gone after reading your post. I have tears the size of boulders rolling down my cheeks and I can assure you, every time I pick up my uke and play it, I am now playing a little prayer for your daughter...one I am certain she will hear. Bless up man...

I have access to a large (handi-accessible) building and have been approached by a few to teach them what little I know. JoeyBug, I promise...tomorrow that is going to happen. I was holding back because I am a first rate hack, but I figure a few chords, a few notes..a lot of Joy. Your post here made that clear. I know you aren't going to make jams in California any time soon- just know you inspired them. I will try to figure out a way to Skype you in when they get going...count on it.

I sometimes kick myself for spending so much time here. I learn a lot, yes, and I have met a lot of cool people and bought a lot of cool stuff I was fine without (sorta) for a long time...but this place is like a drug too me- I check it all day to see what you are all up to. My version of heaven I suppose, and I thank you all for that. Really is a bit of magic on the underground innit?

joeybug
07-14-2011, 10:01 PM
Huna and Janeray touched on it - the healing powers of music. I posted an interview with Wynton Marsalis on another thread where he said of Bach: "this music will heal you if you let it".

It may heal the soul, and no doubt that can help to heal the body. There are limits, however, and at some point you need to simply accept that it may only heal the spirit. That is no small thing. Joey, I think that is what it is doing for you.

I have a daughter, now a young adult. In all but the first few weeks of her life she has been almost completely disabled. The first ukulele that I collaborated on with my partner Omar is now her ukulele. She can't see it, only hears it faintly, can't hold it, can't hold much of anything as her fingers aren't too cooperative. Yet it brings her as much joy as anything in her life.

We play together, and when I say this, I mean it is a collaboration to play her ukulele. I hold it, walk it up to her, take her arm and reach it out to where she can feel the strings. She immediately starts to "strum" it. Not a graceful strum, but she has enough control of her fingers so as not to catch them too badly on the strings. It's not a measured rythym, but to see the way she lights up when she is "making music" is almost as much a joy to me as it is to her.

She'll pause sometimes, sometimes for a long time, as if she's thinking of what to do in the next passage. Then all of the sudden, out comes the arm again, and the smiles and giggles too.

It's sad but true - there are more options for the disabled when they are young than when they become an adult. The "special school" that provides interaction among peers is gone, and there's very little left to replace it. I'm sure the days are long when there's nothing much to do. "Music", in whatever form, can bring joy when little else can.

Joey, I can tell you understand that great ability on your instrument is not the point. You said it well:



When you play with that sort of understanding your spirit will stay strong and your life will be richer.

We all send you love -

The story of your daughter playing, wow, really inspired me, sounds like a lot of fun is had in those music sessions between the two of you, and that music has it own healing powers for both of you..thank you for sharing it with us...



@ JB- you are the board cheerleader, and you have to know that- we all get something from your enthusiasm and obvious love of the Ukulele, and it inspires us in ways that you could never know. Probably seems intangible from your end of the comp. screen...but we are here, and we are waiting for your little bit of sunshine.

I have access to a large (handi-accessible) building and have been approached by a few to teach them what little I know. JoeyBug, I promise...tomorrow that is going to happen. I was holding back because I am a first rate hack, but I figure a few chords, a few notes..a lot of Joy. Your post here made that clear. I know you aren't going to make jams in California any time soon- just know you inspired them. I will try to figure out a way to Skype you in when they get going...count on it.

I sometimes kick myself for spending so much time here. I learn a lot, yes, and I have met a lot of cool people and bought a lot of cool stuff I was fine without (sorta) for a long time...but this place is like a drug too me- I check it all day to see what you are all up to. My version of heaven I suppose, and I thank you all for that. Really is a bit of magic on the underground innit?

I'll hold you to that skype "date". Maybe I'll have my own people to "jam" with at some point, maybe this new venue will encouirage people to come, I hope so :D

roxhum
07-15-2011, 03:00 AM
Wow! I am speechless... someone posted of their discomfort with the post that share personal information. I disagree and they don't have to read this thread. I found it enlightening and inspiring. We all, you all, are multi-faceted with such depth of experience. I wish I could adequately express what is in my heart. My hats off to you. You are all awesome and I appreciate your sharing and exposing yourself and my heart is full of love for all of you/us. And to think a tiny cheerful instrument brought us all together.

joeybug
07-15-2011, 04:39 AM
Wow! I am speechless... someone posted of their discomfort with the post that share personal information. I disagree and they don't have to read this thread. I found it enlightening and inspiring. We all, you all, are multi-faceted with such depth of experience. I wish I could adequately express what is in my heart. My hats off to you. You are all awesome and I appreciate your sharing and exposing yourself and my heart is full of love for all of you/us. And to think a tiny cheerful instrument brought us all together.

Thank you, I was wary of posting because of the thread you mentioned, but had been talking it over with some UU friends and they said go for it, it might not be what everyone wants to read, but rarely are there posts made that EVERYONE wants to read :D

Canoe Lady
07-15-2011, 04:54 AM
I am completely moved and inspired by all of you. You each bring something special and unique to the instrument, and in turn all the instrument asks of you is to smile.

Bring on all the personal threads you want. It is the caring and personal nature of this forum that makes it so special.

dhoenisch
07-15-2011, 04:58 AM
Wow! I must admit that I wasn't going to read this thread as I thought it was going to be a "Woe is me" type of thread, but I feel very inspired now.

While I don't have a disability, two years ago, I broke my left wrist, elbow and a rib in a motorcycle accident, and couldn't play any instrument as it hurt too much, and I couldn't move my elbow or wrist to fret an instrument. And, since I am a banjo player, but play the guitar and most recently, the mandolin, I couldn't handle the weight on my cracked rib.

Well, I teach Sunday School, and before hand, we used to sing a couple of songs before we got started. I used to bring my guitar to church with me to accompany us in singing. Well, the Sunday after my accident (the next day), I went in and we sung acapella, but the kids just weren't into it without an instrument accompanying us. So, after church that same day, I grabbed my very neglected ukulele to see if I could even fret the thing, let alone change chords while strumming. It took some weird contouring of my right arm, but lo and behold, I was able to play it. The very next Sunday, and the two or so months following while I healed and re-strengthened my wrist, I brought the uke to church to sing with the kids, and they absolutely loved it. When the folks at church saw me with the small gig bag instead of the big guitar case asked me about it, I just told them that I left my guitar out in the rain and it shrunk.

Anyhow, I want you to know that you have given me inspiration. I have 6 ukuleles that I was going to use to teach my Sunday School kids, but my pastor shot it down. Now, I want to give those ukes away to people that have issues who can't play the larger fretted instruments, like my brother who was in an accident where he was hit by a truck, and can't use his arms like he used to.

Thank you for posting this, and keep doing what you are doing.

Dan

Mason671
07-15-2011, 05:05 AM
Aloha Joey!
Thank you (and to all those who've posted) for sharing your Aloha Spirit. This little instrument, the 'ukulele, has given all of us so much joy and brought us together as one family. Mahalo Nui Loa!

Mason671

PoiDog
07-15-2011, 05:42 AM
I've also learnt that an Ukulele will brighten even the worst pain days, just being able to sturm some chords is enough to bring a smile to my face and I love it :D

P.S Keep :music:

First off, congratulations J-bug, and well done on keeping up your spirit and on fighting the good fight! As someone who (thankfully) doesn't have a disability, I certainly can't know what challenges you face, but that doesn't stop me from acknowledging and appreciating the effort and the character of those who do.

That being said, the quote snippet above really seems to shine. I've found it to be 100% true. There doesn't seem to be a situation that a few strums, a couple of chord progressions, or a brief song can't ease. The fact that it's therapy for you is fantastic.

Keep playing and keep going!

joeybug
07-15-2011, 11:46 AM
Wow! I must admit that I wasn't going to read this thread as I thought it was going to be a "Woe is me" type of thread, but I feel very inspired now.

While I don't have a disability, two years ago, I broke my left wrist, elbow and a rib in a motorcycle accident, and couldn't play any instrument as it hurt too much, and I couldn't move my elbow or wrist to fret an instrument. And, since I am a banjo player, but play the guitar and most recently, the mandolin, I couldn't handle the weight on my cracked rib.

Well, I teach Sunday School, and before hand, we used to sing a couple of songs before we got started. I used to bring my guitar to church with me to accompany us in singing. Well, the Sunday after my accident (the next day), I went in and we sung acapella, but the kids just weren't into it without an instrument accompanying us. So, after church that same day, I grabbed my very neglected ukulele to see if I could even fret the thing, let alone change chords while strumming. It took some weird contouring of my right arm, but lo and behold, I was able to play it. The very next Sunday, and the two or so months following while I healed and re-strengthened my wrist, I brought the uke to church to sing with the kids, and they absolutely loved it. When the folks at church saw me with the small gig bag instead of the big guitar case asked me about it, I just told them that I left my guitar out in the rain and it shrunk.

Anyhow, I want you to know that you have given me inspiration. I have 6 ukuleles that I was going to use to teach my Sunday School kids, but my pastor shot it down. Now, I want to give those ukes away to people that have issues who can't play the larger fretted instruments, like my brother who was in an accident where he was hit by a truck, and can't use his arms like he used to.

Thank you for posting this, and keep doing what you are doing.

Dan

Hi Dan, I saw your post the other day about the Sunday School teaching and I'm sadden to hear that your pastor has nixed the idea..I hope your next endeavour to help bring the Ukulele to people who are disadvantaged is sucessful, the Uke is such a wonderful instrument that brings me (and I'm sure others too) so much joy, and such brightness to help me through the dark days.

Thanks for taking a chance and reading this thread..


Aloha Joey!
Thank you (and to all those who've posted) for sharing your Aloha Spirit. This little instrument, the 'ukulele, has given all of us so much joy and brought us together as one family. Mahalo Nui Loa!

Mason671

Hi Mason,

Thanks for sharing in the Aloha spirit ever present on UU :D


First off, congratulations J-bug, and well done on keeping up your spirit and on fighting the good fight! As someone who (thankfully) doesn't have a disability, I certainly can't know what challenges you face, but that doesn't stop me from acknowledging and appreciating the effort and the character of those who do.

That being said, the quote snippet above really seems to shine. I've found it to be 100% true. There doesn't seem to be a situation that a few strums, a couple of chord progressions, or a brief song can't ease. The fact that it's therapy for you is fantastic.

Keep playing and keep going!

I think I'm gonna try getting an Ukulele teacher on prescription! It's that good a "drug"!! Thanks for the comment

dawhealer
07-28-2011, 09:45 AM
I am a paraplegic from the chest down, I spend most of my playing in a reclining armchair. After playing Guitar for years, having to stop due to my condition was heart breaking for me, then I discovered the Ukulele and my musical world returned. I like Joeybug would love to jam with others but playing in my wheelchair causes too much back pain, so going to a club is out for me.
Years ago while I could still walk, I set up a guitar club, which turned into a nightmare. I put an add in the local paper and sorted out a school hall.
I arrived a little late, and when I walked in to my horror found about forty people all waiting for "me" all staring at me waiting for me to enlighten them with my teachings. All I wanted was a place to meet other players and jam, not to be a teacher! there were lots of more skillful players there but all they wanted to do was show off. It only lasted about 3 weeks as it just turned into one big noise.
So if you do set up a group, try to plan out what you want to achieve and make this clear to all who join. I'm sure people wouldn't mind coming to you! start with a few and take it from there.But if all else fails, you've always got us!!
As for access to places, I totally understand where your coming from, I've given up on eating out as even if they have access, I can't get my knees under the table.


I've played guitar for a little over 50 years and just started playing ukulele a few months ago. Thirty years ago I briefly belonged to a classical guitar group that got together once a month. It was stressful beyond belief. I don't play music to stroke my ego, but to relax and have a good time. Yes, I play professionally, but that's also part of having a good time. I wish I'd "discovered" playing ukulele years ago. Such a difference in the kinds of attitudes I've encountered. Ukers seem to be a lot more laid back. I love it.

A couple of years ago some folks from the town where I grew up started having what they call "Hoots" about every three months. Saturday evening at someone's home, bring an instrument (doesn't matter), all levels of players, share songs until the wee small hours. Finally found some folks it's fun to just jam with. There were a couple of false starts, but once we got going, it took on a life of its own.

So it's possible, J-bug, to get a bunch of people together for a jam session. I can walk a little with a cane or crutches depending on how level the ground is, but mostly I use a wheelchair. Not all the homes where we've met are completely accessible, but we've managed to make it work. I'm fairly resourceful and not the least bit self-conscious about butt-scooting up steps or stairs under the right conditions and the chance to play music with like-minded people definitely qualifies as a "right" condition.

joeybug
07-28-2011, 09:48 AM
I've played guitar for a little over 50 years and just started playing ukulele a few months ago. Thirty years ago I briefly belonged to a classical guitar group that got together once a month. It was stressful beyond belief. I don't play music to stroke my ego, but to relax and have a good time. Yes, I play professionally, but that's also part of having a good time. I wish I'd "discovered" playing ukulele years ago. Such a difference in the kinds of attitudes I've encountered. Ukers seem to be a lot more laid back. I love it.

A couple of years ago some folks from the town where I grew up started having what they call "Hoots" about every three months. Saturday evening at someone's home, bring an instrument (doesn't matter), all levels of players, share songs until the wee small hours. Finally found some folks it's fun to just jam with. There were a couple of false starts, but once we got going, it took on a life of its own.

So it's possible, J-bug, to get a bunch of people together for a jam session. I can walk a little with a cane or crutches depending on how level the ground is, but mostly I use a wheelchair. Not all the homes where we've met are completely accessible, but we've managed to make it work. I'm fairly resourceful and not the least bit self-conscious about butt-scooting up steps or stairs under the right conditions and the chance to play music with like-minded people definitely qualifies as a "right" condition.

I just got back from the first "meetup", I sat there for an hour and no one else came, but I'm not giving up, I WILL play with human people one day!

Thanks for the inspiration :D

quiltingshirley
07-28-2011, 12:45 PM
It doesn't seem like it should be so hard. What if you just got together a couple of nondisabled folks with their ukes in the park and just started playing and singing with you in the wheelchair? (to show it's open to all) Word of mouth seems to work better than anything else. Gosh my hubby and I play so much slower (and less accurate) than the other more experienced players in our Jam sessions and no one has said a negative word. They just sing along with us and probably sneak off for an aspirin or tylenol tablet. They don't care. I can't understand why any Jam session wouldn't want to include all folks who love and want to play the uke. If you weren't across the ocean you could come to our sessions. Our (and most places here) are wheel chair accessible. You just need a place to sit not eat -- well, maybe put your coffee cup down. You're doing a great job with the Daily Uke and I'm sure you'll work this out too.

Shirley

joeybug
07-28-2011, 12:49 PM
It doesn't seem like it should be so hard. What if you just got together a couple of nondisabled folks with their ukes in the park and just started playing and singing with you in the wheelchair? (to show it's open to all) Word of mouth seems to work better than anything else. Gosh my hubby and I play so much slower (and less accurate) than the other more experienced players in our Jam sessions and no one has said a negative word. They just sing along with us and probably sneak off for an aspirin or tylenol tablet. They don't care. I can't understand why any Jam session wouldn't want to include all folks who love and want to play the uke. If you weren't across the ocean you could come to our sessions. Our (and most places here) are wheel chair accessible. You just need a place to sit not eat -- well, maybe put your coffee cup down. You're doing a great job with the Daily Uke and I'm sure you'll work this out too.

Shirley

That's where the first meeting was, in the park, me with my Uke, plucking away for over an hour, got some smiles from other people, but nobody from our group turned up...I'll have another go at it, but I'm beginning to think I'm destined to play over the internet to be "with" people when I play...and I'm kinda okay with that :D

Thanks for the support :D

dawhealer
07-28-2011, 07:19 PM
It doesn't seem like it should be so hard. What if you just got together a couple of nondisabled folks with their ukes in the park and just started playing and singing with you in the wheelchair? (to show it's open to all) Word of mouth seems to work better than anything else. Gosh my hubby and I play so much slower (and less accurate) than the other more experienced players in our Jam sessions and no one has said a negative word. They just sing along with us and probably sneak off for an aspirin or tylenol tablet. They don't care. I can't understand why any Jam session wouldn't want to include all folks who love and want to play the uke. If you weren't across the ocean you could come to our sessions. Our (and most places here) are wheel chair accessible. You just need a place to sit not eat -- well, maybe put your coffee cup down. You're doing a great job with the Daily Uke and I'm sure you'll work this out too.

Shirley

Good take on meet-ups, Shirley. The "Hoots" I was talking about in my earlier post consist of people who are seasoned professional musicians, beginners, and everyone in between. The rules are simple: We're there to share music and have a good time, not show off how "good" we are. We sit in a circle, go around the circle, and each person in the circle chooses a song to play/share/jam with the rest of the group. Sometimes we'll bring lead sheets for everyone and pass them out. Most of us do covers, some do originals and the genres are wide. Last Saturday was our most recent Hoot and when one of my turns came around, I played Neil Young's "Harvest Moon" on ukulele and one of our group who is an UBER Neil Young freak picked it up immediately (he has the voice for Neil's songs, while mine, OTOH, is more suited to Johnny Cash covers), sang and filled in on his D-35 with the others joining in on spontaneous percussion (dried beans in a plastic cup and a necklace chain rubbed over a plastic folder), backup vocals and guitars. Awesome. We always have at least one "newbie" (and we were all newbies once) because everyone involve has the freedom to invite THEIR musician friends whom the others may or may not know.

Everyone brings a dish to share and their beverage of choice. So far we've never had too many people to manage.

Sometimes it takes a couple of tries to get the timing right, but it's worth it to keep at it.

Michael

dawhealer
08-15-2011, 07:31 AM
I've also learnt that an Ukulele will brighten even the worst pain days, just being able to sturm some chords is enough to bring a smile to my face and I love it :D UU is a great place and I have made so many friends here that I wouldn't give up without a fight!

+1 on playing the uke being able to brighten your day when you're not feeling so sunny. Something about the uke that it's just hard to be down when you're playing it. It's a great little instrument.

You just proved you wouldn't give up without a fight, J-Bug. Glad that's the kind of stuff you're made of and glad you're doing better.

Noobulele
08-15-2011, 09:29 AM
Cheers, JoeyBug (and the rest of you)! Keep on strumming! :)

chindog
08-15-2011, 01:03 PM
Glad your out of the horsepital, Joey! Looking forward to your daily threads again.

mm stan
08-15-2011, 04:14 PM
Aloha Joey,
glad to hear you're back and feeling better...missed you girl...now for me to get better too....Your friend, Stan

suryacooper
12-06-2012, 01:12 AM
Teaching Uke to Student with Cerebral Palsey- help please

I have a new student that I'm doing some singing lessons with- she'd like to learn Uke but has cerebral palsey and is left-handed. I tried retuning the uke and turning it round but it
confused me even more than her! It seems that she can actually hold the uke right-handed but has little strength in either hand (and her right hand is slightly smaller than the left). Does anyone have any ideas how to teach her?? She doesn't have much confidence, can hold a sung melody but her rhythmn isn't great. Any help much appreciated, thanks

suryacooper
12-06-2012, 01:22 AM
Hi Joey. I have done alot of workshops (and attended) over many years at Lower Shaw Farm- they might have a space that you can use regularly - hopefully I have helped them become more disbality aware and they have some accessible rooms. There have been many wheelchair users over the years. It's a great place and they will do what they can to help.

I'm happy if you mention I sent you
let me know how you get on
Surya
x

The Big Kahuna
12-06-2012, 01:52 AM
I can't really offer any advice regarding playing the Uke with your student's particular disability, other than the fact that a cheap Uke, with it's associated issues such as a high action requiring more finger strength, will probably be unsuitable.

That said, is it specifically the Uke she wants to play, or does she just want to make music. If the latter is the case, have you considered an Autoharp ?

000Kanaka000
12-06-2012, 01:52 AM
Was having problems with hand pain and arthritis in the fingers also have
arthritis in the back. The good news is the fingers seem to be getting steadily
better. On bad days start off with some advil and just play through the pain.
Seems the more am playing the more agile the fingers are getting which is a
bonus. Since losing weight the back pain got much better as well. Had diabetes
but that reversed so can say am fortunate that health seems to be getting over
all better. Music is definitely making changes in my world so enjoying every
minute of it. Am hoping that i never get to the point of being to ill to play.

Music can definitely keep one in better spirits and is a wonderful
outlet.