PDA

View Full Version : Custom Hummingbird Ukulele



BB93
07-18-2011, 12:43 AM
I built this concert ukulele for my Yr 12 final woodwork project. Some feedback from the wider uke community would be appreciated that I could attach with the theory section.

Thanks


25759


25760

Penguinofsorts
07-18-2011, 02:11 AM
I like the design! More people might be able to offer up an opinion if we got a sound sample and a video (more revealing compared to snapshots :-) )

joeybug
07-18-2011, 02:13 AM
I like the design! More people might be able to offer up an opinion if we got a sound sample and a video (more revealing compared to snapshots :-) )

:agree: Based on just the design you'll get less votes and interest than if you offer up what it sounds like and such...I think it looks great though!

Doc_J
07-18-2011, 02:28 AM
I like the design! More people might be able to offer up an opinion if we got a sound sample and a video (more revealing compared to snapshots :-) )

+1 on this. Very nice looks. Good finish. What woods did you use?

Sambient
07-18-2011, 02:53 AM
The finish is lovely. Really would love more to go on in order to feel comfortable rating what I'm admiring. Some additional pics as well, side view, back.

Maxjunk
07-18-2011, 02:58 AM
I LOVE that soundhole! But how is the sound coming out of it? You should post a video playing it.

dhoenisch
07-18-2011, 03:23 AM
Oh man, I was hoping this post was for a Gibson Hummingbird looking uke (hmmm...). Your uke is very nice though, but I'd wonder how much that large bridge actually muffles the sound. Like the others, I'd be interested in how it sounds.

PhilUSAFRet
07-18-2011, 03:27 AM
Nice looking uke, sound hole, interesting bridge. Could use more info re: wood used, sound clip.

BB93
07-18-2011, 01:38 PM
I will post some more pictures and a video tonight.

The body and neck are queensland maple. The fretboard is ebony.

rem50
07-18-2011, 02:26 PM
think it looks good, but don't think the soundhole is functionable. also think the bridge is rather large. Now with that said I DO ABSOLUTELY think you should be commended on the work. If I was you I would be very proud of that work! Good job.

poppy
07-18-2011, 03:00 PM
Do you all understand this is a senior in HS and this was a school project. He's not a luthier and in my opinion shoud be given high marks for originality and effort . The workmanship appears excellant I love the design and How do you know how functional it is if you never build it.
BB93 great original design and I hope your instructor liked it as well as I do.

ADD
07-18-2011, 03:05 PM
I don't see a problem with the soundhole. Overall size certainly seems adequate and it is truly lovely. The bridge could possibly be an issue because it is so large. I recommend you post this in the Luthier's forum, where you will get very knowledgeable feedback. It would be helpful to give a little more detail, ex. bracing system used, thickness of the top and the dimensions of that bridge and a sound sample is always nice.

BB93
07-18-2011, 03:32 PM
oh but the sound hole is functional! it sounds great.

joejeweler
07-18-2011, 03:40 PM
Your hummingbird soundhole is certainly attractive,....just hope you never have to get in thru there to reglue a brace! :D

Quite a project for a youngster,......and i assume it's your 1st build. (1 more than ME!)

I would say you might consider a much smaller bridge in the future, as has already been mentioned it is way too big,
and will suck a lot of volumn off the top's production. Most every really loud instrument (guitar, uke, etc) will have a
relatively small bridge, allowing more of the strings energy to drive the top.

As a 2nd project,.....you might record some chord sounds with a decible meter as is,.....and then work out a much
smaller and lighter bridge replacement for this ukulele. I bet the tone would be enhanced,....and volumn certainly
increased noticably.

....OR,......make up uke #2 from scratch and keep learning! Then #3,.......#4,........hehehe

cheers,
Joe T

BB93
07-18-2011, 09:05 PM
Here are some better quality pictures from more angles.

Thank you to every who has taken an interest! I really appreciate the feedback.

25801

25802

25803

25804

25805

BB93
07-18-2011, 09:11 PM
and more...

25806

25811

25812

25813

brucemoffatt
07-18-2011, 09:33 PM
Nice instrument. Well Done.

A suggestion, try stringing up so that the strings come through the nut and onto the tuner posts onto the side nearest the middle of the head, in other words, less lateral string angle as the strings leave the nut. I hope that's clear enough to follow. So for example the G and C strings come through the nut, go up the centre of the head, then around the tuner post counter clockwise, not clockwise. Opposite way the other side obviously.

I love the sound hole detail.

As others have said the bridge looks a bit big. Not sure what your saddle material is, looks like wood. If so consider replacing with bone or other suitable saddle material.

You've done a fine job of that instrument. I hope you get years of pleasure out of it.

BB93
07-18-2011, 10:13 PM
yes i get what you mean, i will do that. what will changing the saddle material do?

brucemoffatt
07-18-2011, 11:10 PM
The idea is to transfer the string vibrations to the top of the instrument with the smallest amount of loss or distortion possible. A very hard material will do that better than a material that will give a little. If your bridge/saddle material is very very hard, for example rock maple, it might be fine to have a one piece bridge/saddle, but that's never the case in ukulele building as far as I'm aware. A separate bridge/saddle allows you to make simple adjustments in string height without locking yourself in, so if your preference for action changes, or if the top moves in time, you can simply make adjustments without rebuilding the whole arrangement. It's all compromise though as a separate bridge/saddle arrangement means some loss of signal due to reflection at the junction of the materials. Also, it's important to keep the mass of the bridge and saddle under control otherwise they may dampen the signal somewhat.

You said the uke sounds good as it is. Don't fret the details too much, it looks like you've done a great job of it. Lurk and ask specific questions in the luthier's part of this forum and you'll get some really good advice from the professionals.

Well done.

BB93
07-18-2011, 11:16 PM
Thanks for the advice. Yes, I am quite happy with how it sounds so for now I think I may leave it as is. Maybe one day when I have time some more time again I will experiment with a different saddle/bridge.

BB93
07-20-2011, 10:41 PM
The finish is lovely. Really would love more to go on in order to feel comfortable rating what I'm admiring. Some additional pics as well, side view, back.

I have upload some more pictures with views from more angles

Foinnse
07-21-2011, 01:55 AM
Great stuff mate, looks like a good job. The other more knowledgable members have already posted so I'll leave that to them but its certainly very pretty and the workmanship looks very tidy. Well done.

Cheers! -F