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View Full Version : Daily Ukulele 7/18/2011: "When You're Smiling"



Hippie Dribble
07-18-2011, 01:29 AM
howdy folks, Joey's having a day off so I've stepped into the breaches...

"When You're Smiling (The Whole World Smiles With You)" p. 265


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-81SyKZFOQ

1928. Larry Shea, Mark Fisher & Joe Goodwin.

popular standard first made famous by Louis Armstrong, later recorded by Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, Judy Garland and Dean Martin, and, more recently, by Rufus Wainwright.

recorded at home under the apricot tree on a Mya Moe sycamore concert ukulele

Have a great day folks! :) And, as the sista herself would say:

Get :music:

joeybug
07-18-2011, 01:32 AM
As always a GREAT video :D I hope to get one recorded today, but it'lll depend on time :D

Thanks for posting this, brought a smile to my face :D

joep
07-18-2011, 06:50 AM
Couldn't help but smile. Thanks Eugene, another great job!

mds725
07-18-2011, 08:14 AM
Great video! Thanks for stepping in. I was missing my Daily Ukulele daily fix.

I actually learned to play this song before I got my copy of DU. I believe that as with other songs of its time, the song has a longish words & music intro and the part that we know today as the song was just the chorus back then.

southcoastukes
07-18-2011, 10:48 AM
...I believe that as with other songs of its time, the song has a longish words & music intro and the part that we know today as the song was just the chorus back then.

I can quote those lines by heart.

1st intro:


I saw a blind man, he was a kind man
Helpin' a fellow along.

One could not see, one could not walk
But they both were hummin' this song:

Then I beleive the notation for the chorus says something to effect of "played tenderly"

2nd intro goes like this:


I used to worry, I used to hurry
Each time it started to rain

But I saw the light - learned wrong from right
So you'll never hear me complain.

Jon does the song as we generally hear it today (and does a great job as always). Played as it was written, however, it can tear your heart out. A lot of those depression era songs had tragic intros followed by an optimistic chorus. They certainly needed a little optimism back then.