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Trob
07-18-2011, 04:22 PM
Hi, I am looking to get a Uke, and i want to be able to play "Something" Like Paul McCartney does in concert. Could someone please identify the size of his ukulele? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7_MsY2IJz4&feature=related

DreamerZz
07-18-2011, 05:07 PM
simple digging got me here

"according to Paul McCartney himself, he plays a Gibson brand ukulele that George Harrison gave him. he stated this before playing "Something" during his MGM concert in las Vegas, 2011.

a clip where he can be heard saying this is on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67YvcJrp2L0

however, Paul has at least one other uke, because during some videos you can see that its not the Gibson uke George gave him. He used a uke to record during the "Ram" album, so he must have another one. "

looks liek a concert

Trob
07-18-2011, 05:12 PM
Thanks.
Would i be able to play it on a soprano? Ive never played uke before, and i want to start out cheap. I found a 20 dollar one on Amazon with good reviews, so im thinking of starting with it.

olgoat52
07-18-2011, 05:16 PM
The tuning for the soprano, concert and tenor size is exactly the same. Some folks use a low G string instead of the high G string which is also called re-entrant on Tenors and sometimes concerts. Almost never on sopranos. Couldn't tell for sure but i think on the video he is playing a High G uke. It is bigger than a soprano, so either a Concert size or Tenor. Concert is my guess.

And yes, you can play it the same way on a soprano.

Trob
07-18-2011, 05:19 PM
Ok, great, Thanks!

So the difference other than size is just the way the sound resonates? Like a Grand piano and an Upright are played the same, but have a different timbre of sound?

PhilUSAFRet
07-18-2011, 05:23 PM
Ok, great, Thanks!

So the difference other than size is just the way the sound resonates? Like a Grand piano and an Upright are played the same, but have a different timbre of sound?

Exactly. Strings have some bearing on it too with some strings producing a brighter sound, and some a mellower sound.

The less expensive the uke, the greater benefit from buying it from a dealer that will set it up properly. To me, it looks like a tenor size

Lori
07-18-2011, 05:30 PM
A concert size gives you a little more finger room on the upper frets (the ones closer to the sound hole). A soprano size gives you better reach (meaning it is easier to span more frets). If you can see some tablature for the arrangement you wish to play, you might be able to determine if it would be easier to play on a soprano or a concert. Some sopranos only have 12 frets, and some songs need more than that.

–Lori

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-18-2011, 05:59 PM
Great idea to start with an inexpensive ukulele! If you want a "fancy" ukulele later, you can always pass on your first uke to another curious-about-ukulele person---spread the ukulele love around.

Trob
07-18-2011, 06:44 PM
I appreciate all the help, thank you all.
As a pianist/guitarist will this come somewhat easily? I've taught myself how to play both piano and guitar, and people seem to think instruments come naturaly to me. Or is ukulele a completely different game?

olgoat52
07-18-2011, 07:02 PM
The chord forms on a guitar and a uke are exactly the same (lower 4 strings D through High E) but the key is different. Ie a G chord form on the guitar is a C on the uke. A D guitar is a G in the uke.

If you know some piano and guitar, uke will be a very comfortable adjunct to the two.

I didn't get into scale length but that is what Lori was referring to. The shortest scale length (lets forget about novelty ukes here) is the soprano. The next longest is Concert and the third is Tenor. And then there is the Bari, but we don't talk about the bari.. (just kidding. Bari is tuned D through high E, just like a guitar.. but then what's the point? play a guitar.

The longer scale length gives you more room to move but affects the tone of the instrument. The most "uke-ish" is the soprano. The least (IMHO) is the tenor. The concert is in the middle and my current favorite. (I have 40+ years of guitar under my belt).

It is the concept, sound and acceptance (positive and negative) that are the "completely different game" of the uke. Will it come easy??? Depends on what you want to do.

diego
07-18-2011, 07:31 PM
:agree:
I have three sopranos, I am saving up for my next and that will be a concert, I want to keep the, lets say, real ukulele sound. Tenor sounds too close to the guitar for my tastes, and I play plenty of that already.

I played guitar for long before discovering uke, and it certainly was helpfull, your fingers justknow what todo already, its slightly different positions you learn, but easier.

Nickie
07-18-2011, 07:36 PM
Great idea to start with an inexpensive ukulele! If you want a "fancy" ukulele later, you can always pass on your first uke to another curious-about-ukulele person---spread the ukulele love around.

This is such a nice idea. I recently bought an inexpensive, but great sounding, ukulele for a friend's daughter who wanted to learn to play. Now her sister wants one.