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View Full Version : My Own Line Of Tuning Forks!



jimdville
07-26-2011, 05:04 PM
I must be at the zenith of my career, my own line of A-440 tuning forks introduced at workshops this weekend in Palo Alto, San Jose and Napa, California. Pinch me! http://playukulelebyear.blogspot.com

itsme
07-26-2011, 05:21 PM
That's cool, but who still uses tuning forks? Seriously, electronic/clip-on tuners are way more advanced.

I have an old "C" fork (don't even remember where I got it a few decades ago) but I consider it an antique/novelty and not something I'd really use.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
07-26-2011, 05:48 PM
I use a tuning fork. Less expensive than an electric tuner, and my tuning fork is a very advanced tool for training my ears; an electric tuner doesn't do that.

Congratulations, Jim, now you're forked!

hosenfeferdave
07-26-2011, 05:53 PM
Jim, i want one. I did not see a link for the fork on the site yet, so please let me know when its up, or if i missed it. I may have to come to the workshop again which would be fun.

jimdville
07-26-2011, 07:44 PM
Jim, i want one. I did not see a link for the fork on the site yet, so please let me know when its up, or if i missed it. I may have to come to the workshop again which would be fun.

I should have them up on my site next week. Jim

jimdville
07-26-2011, 07:46 PM
I use a tuning fork. Less expensive than an electric tuner, and my tuning fork is a very advanced tool for training my ears; an electric tuner doesn't do that.

Congratulations, Jim, now you're forked! Thanks, and you are right about the tuning fork being an advance ear training tool.

joeybug
07-27-2011, 02:25 AM
Congrats! Never used a tuning fork, not really sure how - I mean I know it makes the sound you're tuning to, but I'm not too good at using my ears to tune, use my digital tuner, and I have some idea of how the strings *should* sound, but not too good at matching the sound to another sound, same reason I couldn't use online tuners...yes, I'm aware that I should learn to, I just haven't...yet!

ksiegel
07-27-2011, 10:28 AM
I used to use tuning forks with my guitars years back - I'd like to have one to go with the ukes, as an adjunct to the electronic tuners.

Will you have them with you on Saturday in San Jose?

-Kurt

jimdville
07-27-2011, 01:40 PM
I used to use tuning forks with my guitars years back - I'd like to have one to go with the ukes, as an adjunct to the electronic tuners.

Will you have them with you on Saturday in San Jose?

-Kurt
Yes, Kurt I'll have them Saturday. Good luck on winning the Kala uke we are giving away!

Ghuyduk
07-27-2011, 08:38 PM
Hi joeybug,

As a former violin/fiddle player, here is what you do: hold the tuning fork by by the 'handle', strike one of the tines (the U-shaped part) gently against your knee, then touch the base of the handle (it often is shaped into a rounded ball) against a resonant surface, like the body of your uke. The sound of A440 rings out, and you tune your 'A' string to this reference tone. You then tune the other strings against your 'A' string. After doing this for a while, you can almost imagine the sound of A440 in your mind's ear :)

Manalishi
07-27-2011, 10:35 PM
I recently showed a group of learner players how to
'relative tune' their uke,from one 'fixed' string.I cheated
by having the C string on their ukes in tune,and then
de-tuned the other three! Most of them were amazed
by the process.I explained that in an emergency,this
would put their uke IN TUNE WITH ITSELF but NOT in
Concert Pitch.A couple preferred electronic tuners,and
I pointed out that (say) on a camping trip,if the tuner
battery ran out,or if they forgot to carry it with them..?
Most of them got the point,and continually check their
instruments now,during sessions,by 'relative tuning' having
checked just one string against their electronic tuners.

ksiegel
07-28-2011, 07:52 AM
A good method that i used for years with guitar and banjo - still very useful whenever there is an intonation question. You can tune an instrument to a single reference point, and it can be useful that way, but shows out of tune with an electronic tuner.

As it is, I've got a few different tuners - the Snarks are all dead on to each other, and the O'ahu is mostly on, but not always. It can be 10-15 cents off from the Snarks - and from my ears. Sometimes farther off by ear than the screen shows.

And my old Korg is way off, while the newer Korg is variable. Go Figure.

So I really do want to pick up one (or more) of Jim's Tuning Forks.


-kurt

mr moonlight
07-28-2011, 10:31 AM
That's cool, but who still uses tuning forks? Seriously, electronic/clip-on tuners are way more advanced.

I have an old "C" fork (don't even remember where I got it a few decades ago) but I consider it an antique/novelty and not something I'd really use.Tuning forks have a couple advantages... very compact, no batteries and you can pick them up for around $5. Although ever since I picked up one of those small inexpensive clip-on tuners I've been hooked. Up until then my iPhone had taken over duty as my tuner. It's the one tuner I always have with me.

jimdville
07-28-2011, 11:02 AM
Here's a video I produced to show how to tune using an A-440 tuning fork.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvLpsFroVQM

Doc_J
07-28-2011, 11:55 AM
Jim, had trouble with your link.

This link seems to work better for me. Is this the video?

http://youtu.be/dHWXvSehPy4

jimdville
07-28-2011, 01:30 PM
Jim, had trouble with your link.

This link seems to work better for me. Is this the video?

http://youtu.be/dHWXvSehPy4

That is an older version. This is the newer one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvLpsFroVQM