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Unkulele
08-31-2011, 12:52 PM
Hello fellow uke lovers. There has been some recent discussion of our new website http://unkulele.com

We wanted to formally introduce ourselves. We are Unkulele and we strive to bring the world quality artisan ukuleles we can all afford. Please check out our website and let us know what you think. We are always willing to do custom orders so shoot us an email if you have any ideas unkuleles@gmail.com

Skottoman
08-31-2011, 05:27 PM
Hello Unkulele!

You have asked for some feedback,

I have looked at your site, and it is a very well done site! Easy to navigate and very professional looking. A+++!
I watched some of the videos, and they were amusing, and showed the sound of the unkulele's pretty well.

As far as the ukuleles themselves, you have some very creative designs, unique and easy to recognize. Yet I immediately noticed a few things you could do to "spiff" them up even more.
- I noticed wood shards on the underside of the fretboard visible through the sound holes. Sanding could really clean that up.
- Perhaps instead of silver phillips head screws visible for the headstock, you could counter sink and fill the holes, or use different screws that don't scream "Home Depot".
- There were also some photos where the tuners weren't lined up properly, or screws screwed all the way down.

It's really the little details that attracts us "Uke" buyers! :)

Cheers,
Skottoman

mds725
08-31-2011, 06:14 PM
One really small thing, since you asked for feedback. The plural of Unkulele is "Unkuleles," with no apostrophe before the letter s. The word Unkulele's, with an apostrophe, means "belonging to Unkulele." It's a really small thing and everyone probably knows what you mean, but you're trying to exude competence and expertise, and misspellings on your website undermine your attempts to do that. Otherwise, it's a really nice website and the Unkuleles look cool.

rasputinsghost
08-31-2011, 07:34 PM
Also, 'swag' has one g in it.

lancemanion
08-31-2011, 07:44 PM
No where on your site can I find where they are made. If they are made in the US you should really hype that. I know that is a huge selling point for the flea and fluke.

Teek
08-31-2011, 09:37 PM
I believe they are made at home in Arizona. Also re the phillips screws on the neck join (I think was meant??) that's an electric guitar thing, and my Tacoma guitar has a bolt on neck that works very well for them and I believe Taylor pioneered it, and others also use it...(?) makes neck adjustment on an acoustic much easier.

Excuse me, I need to go practice something on mine before by Advil wears off, instead or posting about it in a forum, lol! ;)

Ataraxia
08-31-2011, 10:17 PM
One really small thing, since you asked for feedback. The plural of Unkulele is "Unkuleles," with no apostrophe before the letter s. The word Unkulele's, with an apostrophe, means "belonging to Unkulele." It's a really small thing and everyone probably knows what you mean, but you're trying to exude competence and expertise, and misspellings on your website undermine your attempts to do that. Otherwise, it's a really nice website and the Unkuleles look cool.

I believe the plural of ‘ukulele' is still ‘ukulele', but for all normal purposes I say ukuleles - Andrew Kitakis <---Taken from Hawaii Music Supply's review site.

I believe that in the Hawaiian language, many words retain their original form when being pluralized (similar to Japanese). It's easy to apply English grammar, which is often done and the pluralization will be noted as "ukuleles" in many dictionaries, but it's important to remember that the two languages are quite different from each other.

Of course, I could be wrong here. If so, please feel free to correct me.

mds725
09-01-2011, 08:41 AM
I believe the plural of ‘ukulele' is still ‘ukulele', but for all normal purposes I say ukuleles - Andrew Kitakis <---Taken from Hawaii Music Supply's review site.

I believe that in the Hawaiian language, many words retain their original form when being pluralized (similar to Japanese). It's easy to apply English grammar, which is often done and the pluralization will be noted as "ukuleles" in many dictionaries, but it's important to remember that the two languages are quite different from each other.

Of course, I could be wrong here. If so, please feel free to correct me.

You appear to be right about pluralization. This is from my Illustrated Hawaiian Dictionary (Bess Press, 3rd printing 2009). "Hawaiian pluralizes in two ways: singular nouns with 'the' (ke or ka) pluralize by replacing ke or ka with na: ka lole = the dress, na lole = the dresses. In all other situations simply add mau before the noun: ka'u pepe = my baby, ka'u mau pepe = my babies." [Many of the vowels have lines over them, but I didn't know how to replicate those lines here.]

The point of my post was that the use of an apostrophe is inappropriate when one uses an "s" to pluralize a word, whether or not using the "s" is itself improper. (One could also argue that it has become common usage with the Americanized version of the word 'ukulele (without the 'okina) to add an "s" to indicate plural. In addition, one could argue that the word "unkulele" (with an "n") is not itself a Hawaiian word, even though it is based on one, so Hawaiian rules of pluralization do not apply.)

Ataraxia
09-01-2011, 12:02 PM
Thanks for the info!

Also, that's a very good point. I suppose the same could be said for most borrowed words in general. We commonly use many words which are taken from French, Japanese, Latin, etc;.... and yet we would never think twice about applying grammatical rules from any of their root languages.

I really like the Hawaiian language. Although it's fairly simple as spoken languages go, there are few languages that sound quite as nice IMHO.

dawhealer
09-01-2011, 03:44 PM
Not a bad site and looks like a pretty good product. Was doing a little proofreading and saw pina colada. Actually, it's a piña colada with a tilde (~) over the n. Spanish punctuation. Actually, the n with a tilde is a separate letter. To get the tilde over the n, type in the first two letters like you normally would and then hold down ALT164 and release. That will give you ñ. Finish the word as usual. It's a simple mistake, really. Most people who don't speak Spanish and a lot who do aren't aware of how to get things like tildes and accent marks over letters when dealing with a language other than English. So, the text should read: ". . . sippin' piña coladas," not, ". . . sippin' pina colada's."

Sorry to be such a nit picker, but bad spelling and bad punctuation can really hurt you in the business world. My wife used to have to interview prospective employees where she worked. If a resumé was poorly punctuated or the spelling was bad it went in the "circular file" and the interview never happened.

It's a very competitive world in which we live. You want to project the most professional identity you can.

Good luck with your ukes.