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View Full Version : Filling in Prior Tuner Screw Holes?



the.ronin
09-03-2011, 11:40 AM
I'd really like to upgrade the tuners on my uke but I suspect the holes are likely going to be different. Is there a method to filing in the old screw holes from the prior tuners?

Gmoney
09-03-2011, 11:44 AM
Easiest is something like these:

http://www.briwaxwoodcare.com/wax-filler-sticks.htm

You'll find similar types at any local hardware store in the US.

Allen
09-03-2011, 09:05 PM
Depends on if they are going to be visible or not. But one low tech - cost way is to use one of those bamboo skewers or heavy duty round tooth pics dipped in glue and poked in the old hole. Trimmed off carefully with a very sharp blade.

the.ronin
09-04-2011, 09:46 AM
Thanks guys for the great advice. I'm leaning towards the wax method thinking that it might be a cleaner patch.

hoosierhiver
09-04-2011, 10:55 AM
saw dust mixed with wood glue is another option

olgoat52
09-04-2011, 12:44 PM
Check Stewart McDonalds "Trade Secret" articles on their site. www.stewmac.com They have had one or two. There is a product called lacquer stick which works great too. You melt and drip colored lacquer into the holes, flatten, sand and buff it out.

TWC

ukulian
09-04-2011, 01:25 PM
I've found that cross grain plugs work quite well. The cutters can be found in most decent builders merchants for less than a tenner. :)

dustartist
09-06-2011, 08:47 PM
I agree with the previous post, if you really want to do the job right, make tapered plugs that you can glue in out of the same wood as the back of the peghead. As ukulian said, they should be cross-grained and not end grain. Cut flush, adjust the color if necessary and touch up the finish.

hmgberg
09-07-2011, 04:44 PM
I assume these are screw holes from geared tuners you're talking about.

Rick Turner
09-07-2011, 04:48 PM
Stick shellac is the ticket if this is just a visual thing. aka "lacquer stick"... Check Behlen's or Mohawk finishing. Many colors. Matches finish. Reversible and traditional. One of the first things I learned as an apprentice luthier was to work with stick shellac.