PDA

View Full Version : Effect of Wound "C" ??



bigdog
09-05-2011, 03:50 AM
What are your experiences with string sets that have a wound C ? I have an all mahogany tenor where the unwound Aquila sets seem to leave the plain nylon C very plunky or thud like , more pronounced than the other strings. My technique tries to soften that "thunk", but I am wondering if a wound C balances and brings the C to life versus the "thunk".

Any thoughts, observations or recommendations of brand and sets that have a wound C ?

Thanks,

Kanaka916
09-05-2011, 04:55 AM
If you like using a wound 3rd, read the Southcoast Guide to Tunings & Strings (http://www.southcoastukes.com/stringuide.htm). Some of their string sets incorporate wounds on the 3rd and 4th courses. Aquila and Hilo use a wound 3rd. Ko'olau has several sets that also include wounds in the 3rd and 4th courses as well. I think the key is a balanced sound and you may find that with Southcoast.

southcoastukes
09-05-2011, 08:41 AM
What are your experiences with string sets that have a wound C ? I have an all mahogany tenor where the unwound Aquila sets seem to leave the plain nylon C very plunky or thud like , more pronounced than the other strings. My technique tries to soften that "thunk", but I am wondering if a wound C balances and brings the C to life versus the "thunk".

Any thoughts, observations or recommendations of brand and sets that have a wound C ?

Thanks,

As Kanaka had mentioned, we try to balance our sets by using mixed materials. With a low 4th, a lot of our sets have wound 4th & 3rd strings - gives a much better balance than having that thunky 3rd string you mentioned next to a much brighter wound string with a lot of sustain.

Now if you're talking about a high reentrant set with only a wound 3rd, this can often be a better alternative - especially with heavier strings and deeper tunings. With it's wound 3rd, a set like this is also technically made of "mixed materials". Your wound 3rd is matched with thinner, brighter strings on 4-2-1, and the brighter sound and thinner diameter of the wound string can be a plus.

On the other hand, it can be too much of a good thing - too bright, with too much sustain. There's the typical "hand squeak" to consider, and as a general rule, companies doing this use the cheapest wound material they can find and they're not very durable.

With our approach, we haven't felt the need for that kind of set. Even on our heaviest re-entrant sets, by using mixed materials, we can use non-wound, or "treble" strings with higher density for the low notes. They'll have smaller relative diameters and brighter sound than the heaviest string on a set made from only one material. Sets with clear responsive deep notes are usually very bright on the high notes. With us, the use of mixed materials gives you "unthunky" deep notes without harsh highs.

bigdog
09-07-2011, 11:30 PM
Thanks..... the south coast info is informative and I will be trying those options.

Many thanks...