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Noobie
09-05-2011, 05:38 PM
I see Shubb makes a capo specifically for the ukulele (http://www.elderly.com/accessories/items/UC9B.htm) now. Has anyone tried one? I'm concerned because I have heard that some capos won't work on the thin neck of the Honu ukes.

And before anyone suggests, I'd rather not tune up or transpose, thanks. :)

Rick Turner
09-05-2011, 07:22 PM
If anyone's got it figured out, it's Rick Shubb. He's sold over a million capos! And he's a great Bluegrass banjo player...and a good guy.

TCK
09-05-2011, 08:21 PM
Wow- A Shubb for a Uke...ordered. I love my guitar Capo

bazmaz
09-05-2011, 10:04 PM
I tried the Shubb and didn't like it. Simple reason? It's too heavy for such a light instrument, and made the neck feel unbalanced.

A shame, as i swear by Shubbs on guitar.

In did test one of these though http://customcapo.com/?page_id=7 which I thought was cool. So light you wouldn't know it was there. I reviewed it too - http://www.gotaukulele.com/2011/01/volcapo-ukulele-capo-review.html

raecarter
09-05-2011, 10:18 PM
I tried the Shubb and didn't like it. Simple reason? It's too heavy for such a light instrument, and made the neck feel unbalanced.

A shame, as i swear by Shubbs on guitar.

In did test one of these though http://customcapo.com/?page_id=7 which I thought was cool. So light you wouldn't know it was there. I reviewed it too - http://www.gotaukulele.com/2011/01/volcapo-ukulele-capo-review.html

I bought one of these I sing like them the button gets in the way and its awkward to put on I have to use it though on the kala as the neck is too thin for my mandolin capo

Lori
09-06-2011, 06:00 AM
I see Shubb makes a capo specifically for the ukulele (http://www.elderly.com/accessories/items/UC9B.htm) now. Has anyone tried one? I'm concerned because I have heard that some capos won't work on the thin neck of the Honu ukes.

And before anyone suggests, I'd rather not tune up or transpose, thanks. :)

I am hoping to buy a Shubb Uke Capo at the Wine Country Uke Fest. From what I hear, he worked closely with some ukulele consultants to develop it. My experience with Shubb guitar and banjo capos has been very positive. They have an excellent fit and finish, low profile, easy use and aren't showy. They really last a long time too.
–Lori

Shubb
12-21-2011, 02:16 PM
Coming in mid January 2012:
SHUBB LITE capo for Ukulele. Less than half the weight of the original, and it'll come in five colors: silver, blue, violet, green and red.

Lori
12-21-2011, 03:12 PM
Coming in mid January 2012:
SHUBB LITE capo for Ukulele. Less than half the weight of the original, and it'll come in five colors: silver, blue, violet, green and red.

Welcome to UU. I can't wait to try your new lite uke capo. It will be difficult to choose the color. I like the blue and the green ones especially.

–Lori

mds725
12-21-2011, 03:33 PM
Coming in mid January 2012:
SHUBB LITE capo for Ukulele. Less than half the weight of the original, and it'll come in five colors: silver, blue, violet, green and red.

Timing is everything. I bought a few (radius and non-radius) Shubb ukulele capos recently (they're still in their original packaging!) but I like the idea of a lighter capo, given how heavy the capos seem to be and how light my ukuleles are to begin with. Maybe I could exchange mine for the lighter ones?

Shubb
12-23-2011, 06:13 AM
Timing is everything. I bought a few (radius and non-radius) Shubb ukulele capos recently (they're still in their original packaging!) but I like the idea of a lighter capo, given how heavy the capos seem to be and how light my ukuleles are to begin with. Maybe I could exchange mine for the lighter ones?

You can trade them in for the new Lite ones. Email me at shubb@shubb.com.

raecarter
12-23-2011, 07:14 AM
Coming in mid January 2012:
SHUBB LITE capo for Ukulele. Less than half the weight of the original, and it'll come in five colors: silver, blue, violet, green and red.

This is excellent news my mandolin Capone's is to large for the thin profile of my kala tenor

mds725
12-23-2011, 09:37 AM
You can trade them in for the new Lite ones. Email me at shubb@shubb.com.

Thank you. That's very generous. Email sent. Merry Christmas!

UkeKiddinMe
03-15-2013, 11:50 AM
I know this is an old thread. Anybody know if that capo is good for a baritone neck? [Kala]

From my guitar days, I had found that the Shubb capo was The Capo to use - as far as intonation goes.

connor013
03-15-2013, 12:06 PM
I know this is an old thread. Anybody know if that capo is good for a baritone neck? [Kala]

From my guitar days, I had found that the Shubb capo was The Capo to use - as far as intonation goes.

Mine works fine on my Pono MB. My guess is it would be fine for your Kala.

It's great, by the way. Easy to use, accurate, not too heavy. Well made and well designed.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
03-15-2013, 01:16 PM
Shubb uke capo is perfect for my Kala KA-B.

Dan Uke
03-15-2013, 01:28 PM
Shubb uke capo is perfect for my Kala KA-B.

Used on a Pono Bari as well and it works fine.

Ken Middleton
03-15-2013, 01:28 PM
From what I hear, he worked closely with some ukulele consultants to develop it.

I hear that the ukulele player who brought the idea to them and consulted with them on it never actually uses a capo.

Personally, if I ever needed a capo, I would use a pencil and an elastic band. Works well on any size uke. You have to get a local luthier to do a set-up on the pencil, of course.

Lori
03-15-2013, 01:54 PM
I hear that the ukulele player who brought the idea to them and consulted with them on it never actually uses a capo.

Personally, if I ever needed a capo, I would use a pencil and an elastic band. Works well on any size uke. You have to get a local luthier to do a set-up on the pencil, of course.

I don't know Ken, a pencil and a rubber band sounds like a dangerous eye injury waiting to happen. I love the Shubb blue and green lite capos the best. I don't need them very often, but when I do, it keeps me from getting a headache.

–Lori

UkeKiddinMe
03-15-2013, 03:08 PM
Yeah, I would definitely have to pass on the pencil and rubber band. :confused:

southcoastukes
03-15-2013, 06:04 PM
The Shubb capos are simply the best! I think we're the only ones to carry the entire line-up for Ukuleles. Flat - Radiused - Standard - Lite - all the colors.

ichadwick
03-19-2013, 12:41 AM
I love Shubb capos for guitars and banjos, but like most metal capos, they make the neck side heavy. I prefer the elastic/fabric or rubber capos for something as light as a uke. Generally banjo or mandolin capos work fine.

Tootler
03-19-2013, 05:36 AM
I have one and I don't like it. I've tried it several times. I don't find the weight a problem but I find it gets in the way.

I keep ukes in different tunings and I find that a much better solution.

Barbablanca
03-19-2013, 05:46 AM
I've got one of these (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Boston-Quality-Spring-Trigger-Ukulele/dp/B0091SUNPO):

It is made of a strong, but light-weight alloy. The spring is pretty powerful and it seems to do the trick well, without weighing down the neck too much. I have used them on Baritones and Tenors. Not tried them on the Concert or Soprano sizes yet.

southcoastukes
03-19-2013, 05:48 AM
I have one and I don't like it. I've tried it several times. I don't find the weight a problem but I find it gets in the way.

I keep ukes in different tunings and I find that a much better solution.

That, of course, is the best solution of all, Toots. When you used the Shubb, however, did you have the "mechanism" on the high side? If so, I can't see how it could be in the way.


I love Shubb capos for guitars and banjos, but like most metal capos, they make the neck side heavy. I prefer the elastic/fabric or rubber capos for something as light as a uke. Generally banjo or mandolin capos work fine.

Ian, the new "Lite" models are hollow aircraft aluminum. Personally, I don't find the standard brass too heavy for Tenors or Baritones, but on the smaller instruments, the Lite model should be fine.

ukuLily Mars
03-19-2013, 07:40 AM
I have the Shubb Lite capo for my Dolphin (soprano) and don't find it heavy at all. I don't use it very often but I'm glad I have it just in case. Very effective and lightweight. (I, too, find it gets in the way, even with the mechanism upward, but I think that's just because I'm not used to it.) I think it's a very nice capo and well worth the money.

Tootler
03-19-2013, 08:40 AM
That, of course, is the best solution of all, Toots. When you used the Shubb, however, did you have the "mechanism" on the high side? If so, I can't see how it could be in the way.


I'm using it on sopranos & it doesn't seem to matter how I hold my left hand it just gets in the way. Oh! and yes, I do have the mechanism on the high side. I think the soprano is probably a bit too small for a capo.

southcoastukes
03-19-2013, 09:07 AM
I'm using it on sopranos & it doesn't seem to matter how I hold my left hand it just gets in the way. Oh! and yes, I do have the mechanism on the high side. I think the soprano is probably a bit too small for a capo.

Come to think of it, I've never actually tried it on a "short-neck" soprano, as we sometimes call them. All ours have 15" scales.

Thanks for the insight, Toots & Lily!

But of course the solution to your dilemma is now obvious. You need new longneck Sopranos to fit your capos!

Dan Uke
03-19-2013, 10:53 AM
I felt the regular and lite and prefered the lite due to its weight. I personally don't like the spring loaded ones

southcoastukes
03-19-2013, 11:51 AM
... Personally, I don't find the standard brass too heavy for Tenors or Baritones, but on the smaller instruments, the Lite model should be fine.


I felt the regular and lite and prefered the lite due to its weight...

I keep forgetting on this thread to separate my comments on the Shubbs from their use on our instruments. With our instruments, we use Pegheds, even on our big ukuleles, so the heads are very light. With geared tuners, however, where you'll get a bit more head bias, the Lite capos may be better, even on the bigs.

Check the balance on your instrument before ordering. If it's plently light at the top, a standard will work fine. If the balance is a bit more toward even, you'd want a Lite model.


... I personally don't like the spring loaded ones

Among other issues, the spring loaded capos generally don't have a pressure adjustment or a way to adjust to the neck size. That means they may work well on some instruments and not others. With the Shubb, there's an adjustment that effects both profile and tension, so you don't end up with too little pressure (muffled notes) or too much (which can throw off the intonation).

OldePhart
03-19-2013, 12:24 PM
Okay...at the risk of being "that grumpy old dude" I've just gotta say...it's a ukulele - four soft nylon strings...learn the barre chords for crying out loud! :biglaugh:

John

Kem
03-19-2013, 01:02 PM
Okay...at the risk of being "that grumpy old dude" I've just gotta say...it's a ukulele - four soft nylon strings...learn the barre chords for crying out loud! :biglaugh:

John

I would love to be able to make barre chords properly. There's something about my fingers that makes it very difficult. They're long, but they're also extremely skinny, and they bend in odd ways. As well, I have chronic joint pain that is not helped by my struggles to form barre chords. I have to admit that a capo is rather a good thing for me. I realise many see it as cheating, but ah well.

And yes, I do have a Shubb. I prefer it to the Kyser, which tends to bend the strings out of tune.

Ken Middleton
03-19-2013, 04:46 PM
Okay...at the risk of being "that grumpy old dude" I've just gotta say...it's a ukulele - four soft nylon strings...learn the barre chords for crying out loud! :biglaugh:

John

Don't forget, John, that capos aren't just used to easily transpose up a key or two. No, a very important use of capos is to enable you to play in keys with open strings. Some runs, hammer-ons, drones, etc. are not really playable otherwise. For instance in this video where James is using a capo when he is already in D tuning.


http://youtu.be/-4pJcRoTg4c


Grumpy older dude.

Newportlocal
03-19-2013, 06:22 PM
Don't forget, John, that capos aren't just used to easily transpose up a key or two. No, a very important use of capos is to enable you to play in keys with open strings. Some runs, hammer-ons, drones, etc. are not really playable otherwise. For instance in this video where James is using a capo when he is already in D tuning.


http://youtu.be/-4pJcRoTg4c


Grumpy older dude.



That was excellent Ken. Hadn't seen that one, and good info.

Ken Middleton
03-19-2013, 09:06 PM
However, as usual, Grumpy Old Dude is absolutely right, of course. Players ought to use other chords besides those in the obvious keys (C, F, G, etc.). For example, try playing a 3 chord song in the key of Db. It really is not that difficult. It is just up one fret from C position. You have to cover all the strings on every chord. That in itself is an advantage. It enables you to easily achieve left hand muting or staccato strumming, for instance. These are obviously possible if you have open strings, but they are much harder to do (using your pinky to mute is one way).

Here's one I did early. It is in Db and it uses a lot more than 3 chords, but every string is fretted on every chord. It enabled me to give the accompaniment a very light reggae lilt. Though you can tell by the number of thumbs down that some people hated me messing with their favourite Buddy Holly song.

http://youtu.be/8b3fKMFHb2s

Grumpy Older Dude

p.s. I used the Db because I can't find the sharp symbol on my iMac keyboard. Anyone know where it is?

Raygf
03-20-2013, 12:46 AM
p.s. I used the Db because I can't find the sharp symbol on my iMac keyboard. Anyone know where it is?

I just use the number sign, the capital of 3 (#) when I need a sharp symbol.

Did a search and found this (http://www.wikihow.com/Type-Musical-Notes-on-a-Macbook). Tried it and it works. ♯ Wish it were easier.

Ken Middleton
03-20-2013, 01:53 AM
I just use the number sign, the capital of 3 (#) when I need a sharp symbol.

Did a search and found this (http://www.wikihow.com/Type-Musical-Notes-on-a-Macbook). Tried it and it works. ♯ Wish it were easier.

Many thanks.

On my keyboard Shift 3 is a pound sign (3). But I have found that Alt 3 is a sharp (#). Have to remember it.

Raygf
03-20-2013, 12:09 PM
Many thanks.

On my keyboard Shift 3 is a pound sign (3). But I have found that Alt 3 is a sharp (#). Have to remember it.

Here's what I get when I alt 3 and Shift 3 on my keyboard.

alt 3 = () A pound sign.

Shift 3 = # A pound sign.

:D

Newportlocal
03-20-2013, 12:59 PM
However, as usual, Grumpy Old Dude is absolutely right, of course. Players ought to use other chords besides those in the obvious keys (C, F, G, etc.). For example, try playing a 3 chord song in the key of Db. It really is not that difficult. It is just up one fret from C position. You have to cover all the strings on every chord. That in itself is an advantage. It enables you to easily achieve left hand muting or staccato strumming, for instance. These are obviously possible if you have open strings, but they are much harder to do (using your pinky to mute is one way).

Here's one I did early. It is in Db and it uses a lot more than 3 chords, but every string is fretted on every chord. It enabled me to give the accompaniment a very light reggae lilt. Though you can tell by the number of thumbs down that some people hated me messing with their favourite Buddy Holly song.

http://youtu.be/8b3fKMFHb2s

Grumpy Older Dude

p.s. I used the Db because I can't find the sharp symbol on my iMac keyboard. Anyone know where it is?

I really liked your reggae version.

bigchiz
05-02-2013, 08:38 AM
Here's what I get when I alt 3 and Shift 3 on my keyboard.

alt 3 = () A pound sign.

Shift 3 = # A pound sign.

:D

The difference is due to a US verses UK keyboard variation. ... In software quality control I test various keyboard layouts for products when they are created for an international audience.