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PoiDog
09-09-2011, 04:48 AM
I've seen some discussion (particularly WickedWahine) about compensated saddles, and am wondering what is the difference between compensated and standard?

Is there an advantage to one over the other? If you have a compensated saddle, does it affect the sound if you change strings?

Mahalo for the answers, and sorry for asking some silly questions.

janeray1940
09-09-2011, 04:54 AM
Have you seen this thread (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?45382-compensated-saddles-on-new-Kamaka-HF-2&highlight=compensated+saddle+kamaka) that I linked to in WickedWahine's recent post? Some good discussion there re: their purpose.

My 2011 Kamaka pineapple came with a compensated saddle. I immediately changed out the Kamaka strings to Martins when I got it home the day I bought it, and the intonation remained absolutely perfect.

PoiDog
09-09-2011, 05:09 AM
Mahalo Janeray! You are a complete font of information.

wickedwahine11
09-09-2011, 05:09 AM
To be honest, I am only switching mine back from a compensated because general consensus (including Chuck Moore) seemed to be that they are not ideal for low g tuning, which I play. If I played reentrant I would leave it since it apparently improves intonation - or at least that is the theory.

chiefnoda
09-09-2011, 05:16 AM
that they (compensated saddles) are not ideal for low g tuning, which I play.

You do need a different amount of compensation for a low-G, thus if you use a high-G saddle for a low-G set-up, the intonation will be off for the G string. You just have to get a saddle compensated for a low-G string. Or, simply use a non-compensated saddle and live with it.

A well-made compensated saddle is worth the money, IMHO

Cheers
Chief

PoiDog
09-09-2011, 05:39 AM
To be honest, I am only switching mine back from a compensated because general consensus (including Chuck Moore) seemed to be that they are not ideal for low g tuning, which I play. If I played reentrant I would leave it since it apparently improves intonation - or at least that is the theory.

Aha. So, since I switch from re-entrant to linear as my whim may take me, I guess it means I need to get a second, non-compensated saddle. I'd probably be well served to get a low-g nut, too, with the proper width to accomodate the thicker g string.

Or, I could just keep my current setup and if anyone blames my poor playing, I can use the improper saddle/nut as my excuse.

Dan Uke
09-09-2011, 06:31 AM
Aha. So, since I switch from re-entrant to linear as my whim may take me, I guess it means I need to get a second, non-compensated saddle. I'd probably be well served to get a low-g nut, too, with the proper width to accomodate the thicker g string.

Or, I could just keep my current setup and if anyone blames my poor playing, I can use the improper saddle/nut as my excuse.

Just buy another uke like the rest of us!! UAS

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-09-2011, 06:45 AM
I've never found it necessary on my ukes using the usual array of strings (Worth, Aquila, Savarez) either high or low G and the way I set the action. If necessary, any individual string compensation can usually be done by altering the saddle itself; it's wide enough to do so. Also remember that the lower the action, the less you need to concern yourself with string stretch compensation. So if your action is unusually high, you may indeed need a compensated saddle.

PoiDog
09-09-2011, 07:27 AM
Just buy another uke like the rest of us!! UAS


Get behind me, Satan.

Actually, I'm still suffering from a severe bout of UDS, so UAS is sort of unlikely :)


I've never found it necessary on my ukes using the usual array of strings (Worth, Aquila, Savarez) either high or low G and the way I set the action. If necessary, any individual string compensation can usually be done by altering the saddle itself; it's wide enough to do so. Also remember that the lower the action, the less you need to concern yourself with string stretch compensation. So if your action is unusually high, you may indeed need a compensated saddle.

My uke came pre-loaded (for lack of a better term) with the compensated saddle, and my limited experience tells my my action is just a skosh on the low side of medium. That said, when I check intonation using a tuner it stays fairly consistent through the 12th fret. For the moment (and for my ability), I suppose I'll just live with it as it is. Perhaps when I am able to get myself a top-shelf or custom model the question of to compensate or not to compensate will be more important.

Oh, and again, mahalo nui loa to everyone for sharing their knowledge, insight, and suggestions! Definitely much appreciated.

Dan Uke
09-09-2011, 10:22 AM
Get behind me, Satan.



Wow...Satan is a little harsh even if it's a joke...