PDA

View Full Version : Why do so mny hate the baritone?



ItsMrPitchy
09-23-2011, 07:44 AM
When i started ukulele i thought of the baritone as the oddball and thought i would never get one. However, i am now planning to buy one.

What i wonder is why so many people dislike the baritone. I know it has a different tuning and its not traditional, but why does it still get hate. Unless you are playing ukulele in traditional tuning your not being traditional and the different tuning just adds some spice to the ukulele world.

I am not trying to bash anyones opinion if you dont like the baritone that is fine with me. I just got wondering why the tenor settled so well if its not traditional just like the concert but the baritone has not. Maybe we will see some more artists endorsing the baritone in the next few years which will help it out.

Tudorp
09-23-2011, 08:01 AM
As for me, I can't say I hate them. They just aren't my thing. Tonal wise I guess. Over the past 35 years I have played everything from electric bass, guitar, keyboard, drums, and the past two years Ukes. I guess if I were to move to a bari, I would simply go back to guitar as my main instrument of choice. I fell in love with the size, and the tones of the traditional ukulele. So, for me, it's not a "hate" thing, it is simply a "preference" thing.

xjumper
09-23-2011, 08:02 AM
I like baritones. I have changed to tenor, and GCEA tuning on my baritones to sound a little different from the guitars that I jam with. I never got the impression that people hate baritones, though.

mds725
09-23-2011, 08:20 AM
I wasn't aware of all this baritone hate of which you speak. Hate is a pretty strong word. Ukulele people I know may prefer other scales and GCEA tuning, but I don't see people going out of their way to bash (physically or otherwise) baritones. Do you have some actual examples of real hate?

ItsMrPitchy
09-23-2011, 08:28 AM
Sorry my bad hate was too strong a word to use for this topic. Guess what i mean is why is it that so many people prefer other ukes to the baritone?

zac987
09-23-2011, 08:37 AM
The idea of any size being "traditional" is really silly to me. If this was the case, we'd all be playing machetes and braguinhas. Guitarists would be playing gut strung 5 course guitars, etc. Hell, let's all just play lutes and theorbos! ;)

bigploch
09-23-2011, 08:43 AM
The idea of any size being "traditional" is really silly to me. If this was the case, we'd all be playing machetes and braguinhas. Guitarists would be playing gut strung 5 course guitars, etc. Hell, let's all just play lutes and theorbos! ;)

I guess traditional in this sense simply means popular. A "traditional" uke is perhaps the sound of the soprano vs. the tenor or baritone. I think the lack of popularity of the baritone stems from the fact that the fingerings are different on a baritone to play the same note or chord. Different tuning sets it apart. I personally love the sound of them and am looking to purchase one. I do know what you are saying though.

BadLands Bart
09-23-2011, 08:49 AM
Nope...I dont hate the baritone, just not for me.

nickie_66
09-23-2011, 08:50 AM
well the ukulele is small and cute, the baritone is big,
ukulele is usually GCEA, baritones are usually different...


the sound is good but the typical barytone uke is more or less a slightly smaller guitar with the 2 lower strings removed .... i think it's closer to the guitar than to the ukulele for that reason ....

Ted4
09-23-2011, 08:54 AM
I agree with the fella above, I have nowt against a baritone but if I wanted to go that low I would simply pick up one of my nylon strung guitars.

Tudorp
09-23-2011, 08:54 AM
I guess by the word "traditional" some would take that too literal. If we were all literal I guess we all would be running around in the woods in loin cloths banging rocks together.. <grin>. By "traditional" I simply mean the "traditional" modern sound that Uke is and was when we discovered it outside of the Polynesian culture. Which typically means the island plinking tones of a soprano being played by a olive dark skinned fat man in a grass skirt.. ;) Accurate or not, that is what I hear or think of when someone says "Traditional Ukulele".

mascompro
09-23-2011, 08:54 AM
Nope...I dont hate the baritone, just not for me.

:agree: :agree:

ukulelecowboy
09-23-2011, 09:57 AM
It's definitely in the minority. No question. And often misunderstood. The misconception that it's only tuned DGBE is fairly prevalent. I play only baritone ukuleles. Exclusively. When we perform, I pay Pono baritones tuned gCEA and GCEA. I assure you they sound nothing like a guitar. In fact, they sound very much like a larger ukulele and fit my size perfectly. The larger fretboard and fret spacing allow me to work with much more complex jazz chord shapes.

OldePhart
09-23-2011, 10:27 AM
I don't hate baritones, but I don't really have a use for one. I almost bought one when it looked like I might be leading worship for longer than a week or two a few weeks ago. Thought it would be cool to use a reentrant-tuned baritone instead of one of my guitars.

Honestly, I don't even play my tenors much. Soprano bodies just sound more "like a uke" to me - though I do prefer the concert scale for fingering convenience, thus 95% of my playing is on longneck sopranos.

When I want a deeper tone, I'll play one of my guitars. And, I know some folks claim otherwise, but as far as my ears are concerned a baritone tuned linear (which most of them are) just sounds like an anemic guitar. I have heard one or two clips of baritones tuned reentrant and they do sound a little more "ukey" but still not the "jumping flea" of the soprano.

John

crowsby
09-23-2011, 11:27 AM
Hate is a strong word. I just think it's tonally too similar to a guitar. I think the same of most tenors as well.

That said, if I came across a nice cheap Harmony baritone at a garage sale, I'd probably be walking away with it.

mds725
09-23-2011, 11:31 AM
I wonder if baritones are more popular among ukulele players who don't play guitar than among those who do. One of the reasons I bought a baritone is to have an ukulele that DID sound more like a guitar so I could get a guitar sound, when I wanted it, without having to learn how to play a guitar or handle its too-big-for-me scale. (In fact, I bought a requinto so I could learn guitar chords without having to learn them on a full size guitar.)

strumsilly
09-23-2011, 12:07 PM
It's definitely in the minority. No question. And often misunderstood. The misconception that it's only tuned DGBE is fairly prevalent. I play only baritone ukuleles. Exclusively. When we perform, I pay Pono baritones tuned gCEA and GCEA. I assure you they sound nothing like a guitar. In fact, they sound very much like a larger ukulele and fit my size perfectly. The larger fretboard and fret spacing allow me to work with much more complex jazz chord shapes.
In fact my Gibson bari tuned GCEA with Southcoast linear strings sounds better to me than any other uke I've had tuned GCEA.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
09-23-2011, 12:13 PM
I love baritone ukuleles! I've listened to some beautiful ukulele music lately played on baritone ukes---Sons of Hawaii (http://www.sonsofhawaii.com/) and Kimo Hussey (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHKoOHG-Ngw).

joeybug
09-23-2011, 12:20 PM
I don't "hate" or even "dislike" the baritone, just don't think it's for me, feels too big, but I'm all about the soprano and it has little to do with "traditional" as you're right, I don't play to the "traditional" tuning, just prefer that size, it's a preference thing with me :D

Colonel Uke
09-23-2011, 12:30 PM
The baritone uke was my introduction to the ukulele. After struggling to play guitar even poorly for years, I picked up a baritone and have never looked back at the guitar. I have since picked up, bought and played at least one of each other uke size. The Bari was my gateway uke, but I love them all.

AetherBlue
09-23-2011, 01:04 PM
I just got a baritone today and I'm loving it. I don't think people consider the baritone a 'true' ukulele since it's so much like the guitar. When someone starts with a ukulele they are usually looking for that high-g sound. I love the size though and it really isn't that big. At least when compared to a guitar. Anyway, it would make a great traveling instrument for someone wanting a guitar-ish sound because they are usually made better and are smaller than a 'travel guitar'

Markr1
09-23-2011, 02:18 PM
I love my tenor ukes and I'm just as happy when playing my baritone as my tenors. In some cases I learn to play a difficult song on my baritone because it's easier and then play it on my tenors. I use the same fingerings for the baritone DGBE as I do for the tenors GCEA and the big difference is the key changes but you can use the same chords just the chord name changes. I think I'm right about what I just said if not let me know so I don't look like a dummy when saying this.

southcoastukes
09-23-2011, 02:23 PM
No, I don't think "hate the Baritone" was the best title for the thread. Should have been more like "hold the Baritone in disdain". A well thought of and poular luthier here said on these pages not long ago, "I don't build Baritones, I build Ukuleles". I think that pretty well sums up the attitude; that the Baritone is just not a true Ukulele. As they are normally built, I would agree.

Not because it's big, not because it is usually tuned differently, not because it's a guitar based tuning, but because that tuning isn't suited to the body volume and because of what that tuning requires of the instrument.

As far as volume take a look at David Hurd's study (I know I've posted this a lot!).

http://www.ukuleles.com/Technology/sounds.html

While Soprano in C and Tenor in Linear C are just over the edge, the Baritone tuning is so low for its body size that it's not even in the neighborhood. The construction has to be different too. This can't be a lightly braced instrument any more, and stand up to the high density strings that it takes to put this tuning on a scale so much shorter than a guitar. Simply put, the tuning is better suited on a bigger instrument, and to support it, Baritones are braced a lot heavier, and performance suffers on all sides.

I know they can be fun (I played one off and on for a number of years), and I know there are some tuning them even lower (just shows what you can "get away with" - and you can get away with anything if you amplify), but in short, to me it was a novelty design - something to train Little Johnny on a junior guitar until his fingers grew. By the way, I was one of those Little Johnnys. As a youth guitar trainer, it's a great design, as an ukulele - not!

I will say, however, that I love the size, shape and beautiful rich sounds that can come out of these instruments. Played like an ukulele, there is no more versatile design. Look back at what Cowboy Mike is doing with his. That's just one of a number of ways you can turn this undiscovered gem back into an ukulele. We build ours lightly braced and no doubt, that makes a difference, but unless your instrument is built so heavily that lightening up the strings won't give you enough "juice" to move the soundboard, then take a look at some of the tunings at the bottom of our Baritone page (you'll see we don't even do one in linear G - those string would be a bit of a strain on our "ukulele" bracing):

http://southcoastukes.com/index_files/inters.htm

And so, nameless luthier, don't refuse to build the Baritone. Just insist on building a Baritone Ukulele.

Emjenic
09-23-2011, 02:39 PM
I like the baritone. I am not a guitar player (after all, who needs more than four strings anyway?), and coming from the more "traditional" uke the baritone for me adds to the range, I like its deep sound compared to the smaller types. I had one tuned to GCEA, but as a matter of fact have gone back to DGBE. I am not a very proficient or experienced player, though, and occasionally I get confused with the different chord shapes, but generally I can manage. So, even though my preferred size and tuning are Concert and GCEA, I love to play the baritone now and then. It adds even more "colour" to the ukulele family.

Nickie
09-23-2011, 04:04 PM
The baritone uke was my introduction to the ukulele. After struggling to play guitar even poorly for years, I picked up a baritone and have never looked back at the guitar. I have since picked up, bought and played at least one of each other uke size. The Bari was my gateway uke, but I love them all.
I'll have to go with an "amen" on this one. Lots of people play the baritone here, two of my closest friends included. I just didn't have strong enough hands for it, and prefer the "plinky" tone of the other ukes to the fuller, almost guitar tone of the baritone. It certainly has it's place, and in an all ukulele band, there would sure need to be at least one!

josh.kattelman
09-23-2011, 04:34 PM
I could see the bari used to fill out the low-end in a continuo group with a tenor in a chamber music setting...

dhoenisch
09-23-2011, 05:24 PM
Funny this should be posted. I took the day off of work today to take my mom to a couple of music stores so she could spend her accumulated birthday money specifically for a new baritone. I see nothing wrong with having a baritone at all. In fact, have any of you played a baritone along with a Soprano? It kind of sounds like they are harmonizing (though I know they aren't, playing the same key). It's really a cool sound. It almost changes the dynamic of the song being played. I don't have a baritone, but if I ever get my hands on some money, I'll begin my search for a Harmony baritone.

Dan

Pippin
09-24-2011, 01:32 AM
Adding a baritone to any uke ensemble really makes a big difference. Every ukulele group should have one. In fact, most of the popular Hawaiian acts also have a guitar player in the band. Tells you something, doesn't it. Either a guitar or baritone uke will serve the purpose well.

Pondoro
09-24-2011, 03:35 AM
I don't have a baritone but I want one to fill in my collection - I have all the other sizes.

guitarsnrotts
09-24-2011, 12:41 PM
I consider them a nylon-string tenor guitar.

kissing
09-24-2011, 01:13 PM
I consider them a nylon-string tenor guitar.

I used to, but after getting a tenor guitar, I don't.


A Baritone uke, in my view, is exactly what it's called. It's a baritone uke.
It is very different to a guitar or tenor guitar in the feel, playability, native tuning (to a tenor guitar, which takes banjo tuning) and shapes (frets, neck, etc).
It's a baritone uke, and has a place as a uke as any other.

NatalieS
09-24-2011, 02:09 PM
I actually love baritone. I've never been able to get the hang of guitar, as much as I love the sound of a guitar accompanying a singer. I had a bari for a while and thought it brought out the best of both the uke and guitar worlds, in that it had a deeper voice but was still strung in the same intervals as GCEA, just lower. I found the wider frets painful for my hands, because my ideal size uke is soprano, but I'm thinking about giving it another go because I still can't get the hang of guitar and I'd like a little versatility in the kind of accompaniment I can use with my singing.

TCK
09-24-2011, 07:41 PM
I LOVE my baritone. It is very hard for me to play (short fingers) but when I pick it, nothing sounds better. I have it strung linear GCEA with some of Dirk's amazing strings and I don't think it sounds like a guitar at all. It sounds like my tenors on steroids. I play all sizes, and the Baritone is decidedly hard to travel with, but when I flop on the couch after a long day and play, it is the one I grab every time.
I have to admit- tuned in the standard, I really liked the boomy bass notes it gave, but the body stifled them- it is way better tuned as a uke, which is where it will stay.

Tsani
09-26-2011, 12:34 PM
My first uke was a Favilla Baritone, and I still love it. However, I have been mostly playing sopranos for some time now. I wanted to really master the soprano in the re-entrant GCEA tuning before I went back to the baritone. I agree with those here who have said that a baritone complements an ukulele ensemble. I am playing mostly classical music now, and I wish that someone would arrange some of the chamber music literature for uke ensemble. I think a trio of soprano, tenor, and baritone could really have some fun playing chamber music pieces that feature counterpoint or canons (rounds) where a melody or a riff bounces around between the instruments.

mds725
09-26-2011, 01:18 PM
I actually love baritone. I've never been able to get the hang of guitar, as much as I love the sound of a guitar accompanying a singer. I had a bari for a while and thought it brought out the best of both the uke and guitar worlds, in that it had a deeper voice but was still strung in the same intervals as GCEA, just lower. I found the wider frets painful for my hands, because my ideal size uke is soprano, but I'm thinking about giving it another go because I still can't get the hang of guitar and I'd like a little versatility in the kind of accompaniment I can use with my singing.

I wonder if one could tune a tenor ukulele to DGBE baritone tuning and get a sound similar to a DGBE baritone without having to deal with such wide frets.

Pondoro
09-26-2011, 02:24 PM
I used to, but after getting a tenor guitar, I don't.


A Baritone uke, in my view, is exactly what it's called. It's a baritone uke.
It is very different to a guitar or tenor guitar in the feel, playability, native tuning (to a tenor guitar, which takes banjo tuning) and shapes (frets, neck, etc).
It's a baritone uke, and has a place as a uke as any other.

I agree that a baritone uke is different, but tenor guitars are often tuned in baritone ukulele tuning, maybe half the time? Nick Reynolds of the Kingston Trio tuned his tenor guitar like a baritone.

drbekken
01-16-2012, 08:21 PM
Maybe it's too late to reply to this thread, but I have reached the conclusion that the soprano and the baritone (the two extremes of ukedom) are my favorites. The baritone sound can be really beautiful, and allows for great picking and jazzy chords & lines...

Skrik
01-16-2012, 08:45 PM
My order of preference: soprano, baritone, tenor. I love all sopranos, fool around on the baritone, and dislike the tenor I own.

clayton56
01-16-2012, 11:47 PM
I like the baritone. To me it has the feel of the tenor banjo. Guitar is still much bigger. However I don't like the G tuning with the low string, I'm experimenting with A tuning and a re-entrant fourth. Sounds superb with my fishing line recipe, same one I use for sopranos and concert. Having mentioned my concert, I have found I don't like the in-between sizes too much. I can't see the point of bigger ukes that have the same pitches.

To me the whole idea of a bigger instrument is to have a lower range, an alto or tenor or bass to harmonize with the soprano. With the baritone, there's precious little difference as it is, only a third or a fourth (I have sopranos in C and D). It gives me some additional keys to pick from, and tone is quite similar since the strings are the same. And you gotta love the extra wide string spacing.

---------------------------------------------------


after reading a few more posts, I saw this quote:

"Should have been more like "hold the Baritone in disdain"

it reminded me that most harmony instruments and their aficionados are held in disdain by their melody-playing counterparts. Violinists look down on violists as people who couldn't cut it as violinists, clarinetists look down on bass clarinetists, etc. And the music is generally written that way, i.e., simpler so the no-talent schlubs can let the melody players shine. Sax is an exception.

mm stan
01-17-2012, 02:15 AM
Are you kidding..the baritone is a big part of my uke family..love mine...

krabbers
01-17-2012, 02:33 AM
i love my Ohana baritone, nice bass notes then play it up the neck for the normal uke sounds .as in the chorus here
http://youtu.be/fZW-AuuFkt8

mm stan
01-17-2012, 02:56 AM
Nice Job Krabbers.. Loved it..If that doesn't get the OP to get a baritone, nothing will...
I use my baritones for picking....but you sure make a good arguement for strumming about it..
wow you have a nice voice too and your playing is awesome..thank you...Happy Stummings..
Love your version.. it rocks....

cahaya
01-17-2012, 04:21 AM
I used to think Baritone is an expensive child like guitar. That was naive of me. There are many examples online to prove me wrong and... make me fall in love with this instrument. Baritone has warm and really romantic tone. Yap, I am in love with this unique instrument.

cahaya
01-17-2012, 04:23 AM
Nice Job Krabbers.. Loved it..If that doesn't get the OP to get a baritone, nothing will...
I use my baritones for picking....but you sure make a good arguement for strumming about it..
wow you have a nice voice too and your playing is awesome..thank you...Happy Stummings..
Love your version.. it rocks....

Amen to that!!

Badger5
01-17-2012, 05:29 AM
I was given a baritone for Christmas and I haven't put it down yet. I'm loving it. There are a lot of songs that work much better on my concert but I love having the option to go back and forth.

myrnaukelele
01-17-2012, 05:37 AM
Baritone has warm and really romantic tone. Yap, I am in love with this unique instrument.
I'm with you cahaya. I love my baritone so much that I want another bari so I can have one tuned DGBE and another tuned GCEA. Some songs are perfectly suited to that lovely cheerful soprano sound. Others cry out for a deeper richer sound.

mm stan
01-17-2012, 05:45 AM
I got two of the same baritone ukes for different tunings.....he he

krabbers
01-17-2012, 07:57 AM
also having the lower tones gives all the songs you already play a totally different feel.

lozarkman
01-17-2012, 10:23 AM
I have five baritones (each tuned differently) and two tenors, and the tenors hardly ever get played. Critiquing a baritone is like critiquing a book you haven't read. You don't know what you are talking about until you have tried it. It is not a guitar, in any way, and in different tunings will get different voicings, all unique in their own way. DaddystovePipe (Carl Budts) plays most of his blues pieces in Bb reentrant tuning, albeit not on a Baritone, but the Bb reentrant tuning on a Baritone is an awesome sound, and so bluesy. The wonderful thing about music, and instruments, is that each of us has his/her own opinion (though certainly subjective :)) and they are all right. Lozark

OldePhart
01-17-2012, 11:45 AM
Very nice, Krabbers. Now you've got me shopping for a baritone... ;)

Actually, I think it's more the new (to me) cutaway mahogany tenor that I got a few weeks ago that has had me thinking about a baritone. I really never had much use for low-g tunings. I'd tried them on both my mango and red cedar tenors and just didn't care for them. Then I got that mahogany and I can't put it down. I guess it's a case of getting a perfect match between strings, wood, and tuning. I've played it so much since I got it that when I picked up my "baby" (KoAloha longneck soprano) yesterday it didn't sound right!

So...been thinkin' 'bout a baritone...sigh. LOL

John

mds725
01-17-2012, 01:03 PM
Nice job, Krabbers. I bought my first baritone specifically to get a more guitar-like sound, but I've learned that the baritone ukulele is its own instrument. While a baritone may sound more like a guitar because it has lower notes than the other instruments in the ukulele family, it also has an ukulele aura that guitars lack.


I have five baritones (each tuned differently) .....

I have two baritones at the momement. One is tuned DGBE and I plan to string the second one with Southcoast's one-octave-lower GCEA strings. I'm curious about the other tunings your other tunings. Thanks!

lozarkman
01-17-2012, 01:29 PM
They are tuned as follows: 1) gCEA low G C tuning 2) GCEA High G C tuning 3) FA#DG High F Bb tuning 4) ADF#B D tuning and 5) DGBE G tuning. I know, that is a lot of tunings, but I find I use them for different songs and moods. I really don't like to capo, and I found it is just easier to satisfy my UAS and tune to the tunings I like. I use mostly Southcoast ukes strings, which acomodate most of these tunings for Baritone. My most recent use is their soft light gauge strings which I am using as my FA#DG high F Bb tuning (which Dirk suggested, and the tuning that Daddystovepipe uses for his blues songs), which I have used a couple of days, but like much more than the all steel strings I was using for that tuning. Maybe a little over the top, but once uke fever takes a hold of you, there is not a little pill that will take care of it. Just more Ukes!! On another note, the only time I feel my Bari sounds a bit guitarish is in the guitar tuning DGBE, and occasionally I do have the mood to want to hear those deeper notes and vibrations they give. But overall I prefer the higher ukie sounds. Lozark

aspieman456
01-17-2012, 01:57 PM
I just can't see myself changing to or learning to play a baritone uke, unless there's a solid reason to do so. If I do get one and learned to play one, I'd learned to adjust to the idea because, as one guy said, the tuning and the strings are totally differeng from those of tenor, concert or soprano ukulele. I've got nothing against it. I'm just saying I'm comfortable with the GCEA strings because they're simple to follow.

ukecantdothat
01-18-2012, 11:19 AM
Ah, the poor ukulele. The mainland's most misunderstood and under-appreciated of the stringed instruments. Funny that even within the ukulele world there's one size that gets treated so poorly. I've seen it derided in the forum before, jokingly usually, and never understood why. It's not just a "tenor guitar with nylon strings," like many have said. Even so, is there a problem with nylon strings on guitar? Don't tell that to Segovia, or for that matter, Willie Nelson. I say whatever floats your musical boat is fine with me. When I see threads like these I always wonder if they have similar discussions on, say, digeridoounderground.com. "Ah, mate, now you've gone to far. Look at the size of that thing, are you kidding me?"

So, no. I don't think anybody around here really "hates" the bari, any more than they "hate" peanut butter and jelly. Just different strokes (up/down down/up) for different folks.

ukuhippo
01-18-2012, 11:28 AM
Get the tar and feathers ready, I ordered a baritone this afternoon.

mds725
01-18-2012, 11:48 AM
Thanks, Lozark!


Get the tar and feathers ready, I ordered a baritone this afternoon.

Like. Which one did you order. Please let us know what you think of after you've had a chance to play it.

Gwynedd
01-18-2012, 01:37 PM
Not me, bruddah. I played one as a kid and my next and probably last-for-a-while uke will be a baritone. I like them. Still waiting on my Mainland tenor. Sigh.

ukuhippo
01-18-2012, 08:23 PM
Thanks, Lozark!



Like. Which one did you order. Please let us know what you think of after you've had a chance to play it.

I liked my Dolphin so much that I ordered a Makala MK-B.

Gwynedd
01-18-2012, 11:20 PM
I liked my Dolphin so much that I ordered a Makala MK-B.

When you do, please post a review and even song sample--I'd be interested to hear your opinion. I also have a Dolpin and it really isn't a bad little uke. It's tiding me over till my "real" instrument shows up.

SweetWaterBlue
01-19-2012, 04:03 AM
I don't hate baritones. I love the way they sound with ballads and cowboy songs.

ichadwick
01-19-2012, 06:10 AM
What i wonder is why so many people dislike the baritone.
Love them. I now play bari more than tenor. I think some people don't like them because they've never played one for any length of time. There are some who consider themselves purists and will not play anything larger than a soprano. I prefer the extra rich tones, volume and fretboard space a baritone offers. But then I started with a guitar.

I have baris in low and high D, by the way. I prefer high D. I recently bought a 4-string cigar box guitar, which is basically a long-necked uke, even longer than a baritone.

Nickie
01-19-2012, 06:20 AM
The idea of any size being "traditional" is really silly to me. If this was the case, we'd all be playing machetes and braguinhas. Guitarists would be playing gut strung 5 course guitars, etc. Hell, let's all just play lutes and theorbos! ;)
I think it's wonderful how several modern instruments have evolved from the originals. I can't see anything "nontraditional" about any sized ukulele. I just don't happen to play the bari, because I found it too hard to chord, for me. One of my very best friends plays the bari, and I love it! It seems to me that a really great ukulele band could incorporate a bari, or two... I think it would sound great!

FlyedPiper
01-19-2012, 07:10 PM
I'm new to ukulele, but I've owned all sizes except sopranino.

I think where the bari really shines is for folks who have never played the guitar (like myself) and want to hear some of those low tones. I think if you play the tenor with low g primarily you owe it to yourself to try a quality baritone out. There are companies now that make strings to that tuning. My guess is that the things you like about that tenor with low g will only be amplified by a quality baritone. I think the options will continue to grow as the ukulele as an instrument continues to grow in popularity.

There is also the standard baritone tuning, which will be my main preferred instrument as time progresses I think... really anything can be played on a baritone ukulele, from islandy ukey stuff to modern rock, jazz and blues... and in a comparatively small and cheaper package, if you look at it in terms of what you pay for and what you get, compared to a quarter sized guitar. They are especially appealing to a guitar player who wants a quality travel-sized instrument.

That being said I love my concert size and I'm glad I took the time to learn the chording on them and they will be be my go-to instrument for traveling or playing traditional Hawaiian stuff.

I love the baritone ukes, both in linear C tuning and "traditional" baritone tuning. I've found my niche. And the fact that it's a small niche (less than 10% of uke players prefer the baritone size) makes it even more appealing to me.

Long live the baritone ukulele, and the evolution of ukulele music!

FlyedPiper
01-19-2012, 07:28 PM
i love my Ohana baritone, nice bass notes then play it up the neck for the normal uke sounds .as in the chorus here
http://youtu.be/fZW-AuuFkt8


And this.... tell me where you can get this kind of tone variety out of any instrument. Slap a capo on the fifth fret and you've got your gCEA tenor with better bass all day long... well played, sir. Well played :)

FlyedPiper
01-19-2012, 07:38 PM
And here's why you need a Kamaka (and a hot Hawaiian girl to play it) :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhh00MyhYOo

Loupin' Flech
01-20-2012, 12:12 PM
I've just recently bought a baritone(a Greg Bennet by Samick)and I think it's a great wee instument.I started out a year ago on soprano but soon found it didn't suit a lot of the songs I wanted to play,especially Scottish songs.So I bought a tenor,then an 8 string and finally the baritone.Each one expanded the range of tunes I could play and some fit certain tunes better than others,the bari's very good for some of the more threatening sounding songs,like Twa Corbies for instance.So there's definately a place for them in your uke lineup I reckon.Next,a banjo uke,then a mountain dulcimer,then a...:D

SailQwest
01-20-2012, 12:27 PM
I love jamming with the radio on my husband's bari-tuned tenor. The fingerings are much easier for "guitar" keys than with standard tuning.

roxhum
01-20-2012, 01:17 PM
Woohoo I just ordered a baritone from Uke Republic. My first uke in quiet awhile.

hmgberg
01-20-2012, 02:18 PM
And here's why you need a Kamaka (and a hot Hawaiian girl to play it) :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhh00MyhYOo

They're both pretty.

OldePhart
01-20-2012, 02:21 PM
And here's why you need a Kamaka (and a hot Hawaiian girl to play it) :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhh00MyhYOo

What, was there an ukulele in that video? :)

ukuhippo
01-21-2012, 04:11 AM
I'm thinking about getting some Worth Brown unwound Baritone strings. Has anyone experience with these and the difference in sound/playing between wound and non-wound strings?

TheCraftedCow
01-21-2012, 08:02 PM
Some have a strong preference for one size over the other. There is no question about the spread from the first fret to the fourth fret being farther on a bari than on a soprano. Some do not know that a tenor can be tuned DGBE or a bari tuned GCEA. Some don't know that 0-0-0-3 has me singing in G or C without changing finger positions. If I have worked a complicated song, but want to change keys, I just change ukes. For a sustained sound, it's the guitar or the bari regardless of which ever tuning. For a quicker decay so close chords do not get muddy, go with a smaller bodied instrument. BUT, with a low G, even a soprano will sustain a note or a chord. The argument because one size is traditional is a joke if it has decent strings; is anything but mahogany or koa or has anything but tapered sticks for tuners. It is certainly not traditional. It is noteworthy of how many of the named players use a tenor. The Long Neck Soprano seems to be a nice compromise with a small body and a longer neck.

blue_knight_usa
01-22-2012, 07:26 AM
I think the baritone is great. We just had someone join our uke jam group and he plays baritone and it's fantastic! It fills in the lower end so we get a much fuller sound when we are playing.
2 of us play Concert/Tenor, and 2 usually play Soprano/Concert so having the baritone is great. I'm a fan. Don't play one and probably wouldn't with the different fingering in the standard tuning (although you can tune for GCEA I hear) but it just really fills that gap when your playing with a few folks. For all you baritone players, keep it going!