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View Full Version : what size drill bits are needes to install a misi?



raecarter
09-25-2011, 12:55 AM
Hi can anyone tell me what drill bit would need for the jack plug to be installed and the little hole through the saddle when installing a misi please?

Mason671
09-25-2011, 04:11 AM
Aloha Rae,
You can watch Joe Souza of Kanile'a install a Mi-Si Trio pick-up in this Uke Minute (http://ukuleleunderground.com/2009/11/uke-minutes-69-how-to-install-an-ukulele-pickup/) video. I hope this helps.

Mason671

Gmoney
09-25-2011, 05:01 AM
If you don't already have it, here is the link to Mi-Si's installation manual:

http://mi-si.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/trio.manual_1.pdf

But it doesn't mention the drill sizes. :(

But... the end pin hole uses a 1/2-inch drill bit. Rather than using a common "spade" bit that might wobble a bit, I first used a smaller 1/8 inch to get the starter hole & then used a Forstner bit to complete the hole (or a step drill bit,(3/16 -1/2"). (apologize for the US bit sizes - the old brain still doesn't think in metric).

The bit for the pickup is going to be either a .094 (a 1/8 is close) - it just needs to be the approximate size of the string slot so that it isn't wider than the slot itself. Goes w/o saying that the element needs to be able to sit in the slot without crimping so that it lies flat.

There's a thread where Chuck Moore also added a bit of advice vis a vis installation, advising that you drill a hole on both ends of the slot so that the end of the pickup goes into the body as well - the last 1/8" or so of the pickup isn't active. Also Chuck has shown photos as to how he coils the extra length before installation as the entire lenght of the element is active & will really pickup body noise otherwise.

UkuEroll
09-25-2011, 08:09 AM
I just watched the video and was surprised that the slot had to be routed, could sanding down the saddle do the same job. I realize that doing it the router way would be quicker, but I was hoping to do it myself and I don't have the router or the jig.

Gmoney
09-25-2011, 10:29 AM
I just watched the video and was surprised that the slot had to be routed, could sanding down the saddle do the same job. I realize that doing it the router way would be quicker, but I was hoping to do it myself and I don't have the router or the jig.

Joe's obviously done a few of these! The possible problem that he's averting is the fact that if the saddle slot isn't deep enough for the added thickness of the pickup AND the saddle, you can end up w/too little saddle above the slot & lose the correct contact of the saddle to the pickup or risk cracking the bridge if the shape of the bridge itself doesn't allow for the extra pressure of the tilting saddle. The photo in the Mi-Si PDF illustrates this pretty well.

Of course, this amateur (me, that is) would never attempt using a router anywhere near my ukes! Saddle sanding it would have to be for me - or as I've mentioned on Rae's other thread, taking it to a professional who does this for a living & has done a LOT of them! Plenty of people here on UU have done this install on their ukes w/o the need of the router, but..."your mileage may vary"!

Trinimon
10-24-2011, 07:11 AM
I installed my first MISI pickup last night on my Kala acacia concert uke.

Installation was pretty simple, being familiar with your tools surely helps but I tell ya, drilling holes into a uke isn't for the faint at heart! I taped up that uke anywhere that can accidentally be damage. I must have measured like five or six times before starting up the drill.

I used a 1/2" brad point bit to do the initial start of the hole for the jack. Just enough to scour the surface of the uke to the diameter of the hole to avoid blowouts in the wood as I am not familiar with the way Acacia wood handles. I find using larger bits like a 1/2" brad point or even a forstner bit on a hand held drill can wobble or creep if they don't clear the material cleanly.

Next I used a 1/8" bit to drill a pilot hole through the bottom of the uke. I used a 1/8" to 1/2" unibit to open up the hole to the required 1/2" size.

With the bridge all taped up, I used a 3mm brad point bit to drill an angled hole for the pickup sensor. A 1/8" or even 7/64" bit would have marred the sides of the bridge, at least on my uke. After a few sizing up attempts to get the correct depth setting of the jack assembly, I added some Loctite to the inner nut and then inserted it through the hole and fastened it (snug not tight) with the exterior washer/nut/cap.

Getting the sensor through the hole took some finesse. First I tried fishing line but had nothing but frustration. Ended up using some stainless steel single strand fishing leader wire (just like how Joe installed it in the Kanilea video using thin copper wire) to fish it thru. MUCH easier!

I used a spare Tusq saddle (kept the original ebony one just in case), sanded down as required and restrung the uke.

Dominator
10-24-2011, 07:27 AM
Getting the sensor through the hole took some finesse. First I tried fishing line but had nothing but frustration. Ended up using some stainless steel single strand fishing leader wire (just like how Joe installed it in the Kanilea video using thin copper wire) to fish it thru. MUCH easier!


A piece of thread works great also. I tried fishing line the first time using scotch tape to hold it to the end of the element. It kept pulling right off. The tape sticks good to the thread and it worked like a champ.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-24-2011, 07:29 AM
I use heavy carpet thread and a tiny dot of medium ca.

Trinimon
10-24-2011, 08:32 AM
Yeah I was going to try some fine string/thread next because the nylon fishing line just kept slipping off the sensor. The fine wire leader worked well because I got the tip of the sensor in line with the wire and it fished right through. I'm no pro at this but all the suggestions/tips etc on UU sure helped a lot!! Gotta luv UU! :)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-24-2011, 08:55 AM
This is a new ukulele pickup from LR Baggs. The UST has a little fitting with a hole in the end of it eliminating all this hassle we've been talking about. Unlike the MiSi it takes a tiny coin-type battery (lasts 300 hours) and has a volume control. I should have my samples in a few days and let you know what I think of them. It looks promising.

http://www.lrbaggs.com/uke/

Gmoney
10-24-2011, 09:03 AM
This is a new ukulele pickup from LR Baggs. The UST has a little fitting with a hole in the end of it eliminating all this hassle we've been talking about. Unlike the MiSi it takes a tiny coin-type battery (lasts 300 hours) and has a volume control. I should have my samples in a few days and let you know what I think of them. It looks promising.

http://www.lrbaggs.com/uke/

I LIKE this! Will be interesting to see/hear how it works out. Since they are marketing it directly for ukuleles, I bet that the element is shorter than the one w/the Mi-Si, since its just the standard guitar element - thus less element "slack" to deal with.

Trinimon
10-24-2011, 09:15 AM
Awesome! I'll be keeping an eye out for your review! I got another uke waiting for a pickup. lol

Any idea what the price range will be? Can't see them on the online dealers, guess it's too new.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-24-2011, 09:59 AM
Yes, they are a brand new item. I just got the notification from Baggs a few days ago. The prices vary depending upon whether you are buying retail or wholesale and the quantity purchased. It seems to me that when you count in the volume control they should be around 50% higher than the MiSi Acoustic Trio.

Trinimon
11-03-2011, 08:53 AM
Hi Chuck, have you managed to take the new Baggs Five-O pickups through their paces as yet? :p

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-03-2011, 12:18 PM
Hi Chuck, have you managed to take the new Baggs Five-O pickups through their paces as yet? :p

I've received them but haven't had a chance to install one yet. Hopefully by the weekend. PM me in a few days in case I forget to update here.

Trinimon
11-03-2011, 12:21 PM
LOL, no worries. Mahalo Chuck! :)