PDA

View Full Version : Blackheart Sassafrass Soprano



Liam Ryan
09-25-2011, 12:55 AM
This is the latest cab off the rank. I've had this one on the bench for a while now, It's the first uke I did with double sides, although I completed a Mahogany Soprano with double sides between starting this and finishing this one.

The Blackheart Sassafrass top, back and sides provide striking contrast. The uke also features Indian Rosewood bridge, fretboard and appointments. Satin lacquer finish. Now to just find a home for it..........

2831528316283172831828319

rosceaux
09-25-2011, 02:45 AM
That is strikingly handsome. Beautiful work.

I always thought I was a one uke man, but now I knowhow people catch UAS

erich@muttcrew.net
09-25-2011, 03:38 AM
Very impressive work. I expect you'll quickly find a buyer.

Gmoney
09-25-2011, 03:57 AM
That is just absolutely stunning. I love the bookmatching - the patterns are striking. Shouldn't have any problem finding it a home, but would love for one like that to make it to the Southern US. You and Allen both do amazing work.

elisdad
09-25-2011, 03:59 AM
That is a very nice looking uke. The styling you chose is very appealing.

Allen
09-25-2011, 11:09 AM
Rushed home and got the strings on it I see Liam. It really has come up a treat.

shrink9
09-25-2011, 11:56 AM
What do you mean by "double sides?" It is really beautiful. Between you and Allen, there's no question that there are amazing luthiers in Australia!!

josh.kattelman
09-25-2011, 12:18 PM
This is a very, very attractive instrument, sir.

ecosteel
09-25-2011, 02:47 PM
Stunning uke. I too was wondering about the double sides.

Lori
09-25-2011, 02:53 PM
Wow, what a beautiful uke!!!! Any sound samples? I have never heard a sassafras uke.
–Lori

Michael Smith
09-25-2011, 08:56 PM
Boo Yaa!! that is a great looking uke. I'm a sucker for widely contrasting colors and tones. I like it.

Liam Ryan
09-25-2011, 11:48 PM
Here's a little tutorial I did a while back on double sides:
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?49652-Double-Sides-How-to&highlight=double+sides

I think there's probably a fair bit of unqualified info out on the interwebs on double sides. I could spin you a whole bunch about how double sides are the latest, greatest thing to hit the uke world, they make the uke so (insert superlative)....................The fact is that for the most part my opinion on double side is fairly unqualified too. This is the second uke I've strung up with double sides. That's not a large sample size to base an opinion on.

What I can tell you is that i don't need to use a mold during construction. I don't have to worry about making sure everything stays perfectly symetrical and doesn't move because it doesn't. I also suspect that the sides of the finished uke could take a harder knock than a regular sided uke, although if it did smash it'd be a nightmare to fix. The sides are definately more rigid than single sides although once glued into a box even single sides are pretty rigid.

All in all the jury is still out for me sound wise, I do it more to help with quality control.

Allen, I got the yard chores done before string up. I'd have to get up pretty early to sneak into the shed with out getting my chores done. So it was move 400kgs of granite garden edging, then floor mopping, then beer, then string up.:)

Lori, the strings have only been on for a bit over 24hrs. It's just starting to show hints of how it'll sound once it opens up. I'll see what I can do for a sound sample in a week or two.

Allen
09-25-2011, 11:59 PM
Sorry, you lost me at beer.:) Don't let that worry the rest of you. Summer is coming in the tropics and it was the weekend.

Liam Ryan
09-26-2011, 12:03 AM
You'll never lose me at beer. In fact if you've got beer it's hard to get rid of me.:drool:

Pete Howlett
09-26-2011, 11:30 AM
While not wanting to be 'corrective', double sides is very misleading term - you are actually 'laminating' if I follow the method correctly. I will as usual stand corrected myself if I am barking up the wrong tree here :)

You might want to try an old veneering method to glue the sides. Create a 'box' and in it place a rubber tube with a sealed end and a non-return valve which you can inflate with foot pump. It will clamp much better than those rubber bands and you wont run the danger of getting dry pockets.

hoosierhiver
09-26-2011, 11:33 AM
Wow, beautiful uke!

I know it's a totally different tree, but has anyone ever tried American Sassafras for a top?

josh.kattelman
09-26-2011, 02:05 PM
*cautiously, given the hoo-hah I seemed to cause last time I posted here*

Pete,

Could you explain what you mean by "box"? Is it similar to this (http://http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/makingbags.htm)? I've been thinking of ideas of how Brad's method of laminate-making might be improved, like putting the whole thing into a vacuum bag.

Also, my father-in-law has graciously allowed me some "shop time" in his garage so that I might learn how to heat-bend with a torch/pipe. =)

Best,

-josh

Pete Howlett
09-26-2011, 03:18 PM
Can't get that link to work Josh...

josh.kattelman
09-26-2011, 05:25 PM
Sorry...Google Chrome automatically fixes my errors. ;)

Try this:

http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/makingbags.htm

southcoastukes
09-26-2011, 05:28 PM
We've got a lot of Sassafras trees around here (spelled without the 2nd "s"). The dried, ground leaves (maybe caricinogenic in large quantities?) are what we use for file powder in several of our gumbos.

I'm not sure if this is what you mean by "Black Sassafras". I'll have to get a look at the next one to go down in a hurricane.

Also, those tuners look nice! What are they?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-26-2011, 06:08 PM
The back on that is especially stunning. Nice job.

cclancy
09-26-2011, 07:33 PM
Damn, that's one cool & sexy uke Liam!:cool:
I've got some uke sized BHS back in Canberra just waiting for me:D....if it hasn't rotted over the wet summer & winter:eek:.

On a uke, wouldn't solid or reverse-kerfed linings make the sides just as stiff?

Liam Ryan
09-26-2011, 09:25 PM
Pete, you may well be right. The term "double sides" is quite commonly used to represent laminating two thin sides together. I certainly wasn't trying to be misleading. There's no secrets in my workshop. If anyone wants to know how I do something all they have to do is ask.

Dirk, Blackheart Sassafras is native to Tasmania, a small island state of Australia. I think the blackheart staining only happens to the two headed trees that marry their cousins, so it's pretty common. I got mine from Australian Tonewoods.com

Craig, solid linings do make the sides pretty stiff. I haven't tried reverse-kerf so I'll decline to comment.

Allen
09-26-2011, 11:56 PM
Dirk, Blackheart Sassafras is native to Tasmania, a small island state of Australia. I think the blackheart staining only happens to the two headed trees that marry their cousins, so it's pretty common. I got mine from Australian Tonewoods.com
:D

I've waited nearly a year here for a Tassy joke.

cclancy
09-27-2011, 12:37 AM
:D :D :D
And aren't Nth Queenslanders descended from cane toads?

Pete Howlett
09-27-2011, 01:14 AM
No criticism Liam - just a common language separated by different meanings :) Stunning effect. Wish we had that wood in the UK. Being a temperate weather zone most of our timber is uniform and 'bland'. Granted you have fiddleback sycamore and occassionally that figure in walnut, there is nothing to match the figure that is produced in trees that grow in hotter/wetter climates.

Liam Ryan
09-27-2011, 01:55 AM
Pete, Tasmania is a long way from the tropics. There's only blue water, iceburgs and a Japanese whaling fleet between Tassie and Antarctica. The best Australian Black Acacia comes from Tassie too.

Pete Howlett
09-27-2011, 03:56 AM
It's an extreme location then? In my original post which I self edited I wrote the word extreme but thought it might offend.... You know what I mean though? Timber from the temperate zones is invariably bland unless it is subject to an 'infestation' while growing or artificially manipulated like spalting. And I have just made a tenor in Tasmanian Blackwood - it's great to bend and has a lovely tone. There is a guy in the UK selling figured guitar sets but they are just not the right size for me to get a value for money ukulele yield from...

Vic D
09-27-2011, 04:59 AM
That's one of the most beautiful ukes I've ever seen. In fact it's one of the most beautiful instruments I've ever seen period. I must have some of that stuff some day. I've bookmarked Australian tonewoods just in case I get lucky and get some extra jingle.

ukeeku
09-27-2011, 06:21 AM
I don't know why, but I want to know how that uke tastes. I would like to lick it. I bet it tastes as good as it sounds

Allen
09-27-2011, 11:22 PM
That's one of the most beautiful ukes I've ever seen. In fact it's one of the most beautiful instruments I've ever seen period. I must have some of that stuff some day. I've bookmarked Australian tonewoods just in case I get lucky and get some extra jingle.

Tim Spittle who owns Australian Tonewoods builds (though doesn't have much time now) as well as sells wood, so knows what we are all looking for. He's also a personal friend and as honest a bloke as you'll ever find. I don't think you'll find an Aussie luthier who hasn't bought something from him and wouldn't back up his product and service.