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View Full Version : Pick guard and Saddle



souljam
09-29-2011, 07:07 AM
I was just wondering, what is your experience with ukulele pick guards. I'm looking to get one of those clear sticker type ones for my Kanilea custom, but does anyone have any suggestions on where to get them?

Also, I have been having intonation problems, especially on the C string. It is sharp up a the 12th fret. I noticed on Aldrine's ukulele this summer that his saddle seems to have a correction for this. Ive been looking for a saddle like that online but have not been successful. Anyone else with a Kanilea have this problem?

Thanks

olgoat52
09-29-2011, 07:23 AM
THese are removable. http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?NameProdHeader=Removable+Pickgua rds You can get the middle one and cut it to fit. Very thin stuff. Does not appear to affect the top vibration at all.

Elderly carries clear self adhesive guards too. Ukeeku uses them. They are not easily removable. Need a hairdryer or heat gun and there will be some cleanup to get the adhesive off. http://elderly.com/search/elderly?terms=pickguard%20clear&step=20&page=7&query_start=139&cname=Search

Stewmac carries material as well. It will be thicker and self adhesive. http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Pickguards/Pickguard_materials/Clear_Pickguard_Materials.html?actn=100101&xst=3&xsr=3693

I am not aware of any pre-made compensated saddles. They are usually made for the particular instrument. Depending on how thick the saddle is it may or may not be possible to correct the intonation. The saddle should not be moving in the slot, it should be tight so that it stands straight up. The full is "flat forward" so if you are sharp you need to move the string contact point on the saddle back.

jackwhale
09-29-2011, 07:35 AM
Before modifying the bridge I would contact Kanilea about your intonation problems. I'm sure they would want you to be totally happy with their uke. Also I would change the string(s) and let them settle--just to be sure there isn't a simple fix.


I just noticed that you divide your time between Hawaii and Boston (lucky guy-too bad about the Sox). You could stop by the Kanilea shop and they could perhaps modify the bridge if necessary.

CoLmes
09-29-2011, 07:45 AM
It's called a compensated saddle. They basically mess with your saddle depending on what kind of strings you use for the correct intonation to be achieved. I know Aldrine uses T2's but he strings them differently. I forget exactly how, I think he mentioned it in one of the recent live lessons.

Def. call Kanile'a. I'm sure they'll hook you up.

Mandarb
09-29-2011, 09:48 AM
Here is a link explaining a compensated saddle for guitars where it is even more crucial due to the greater string length.... http://www.lutherie.net/saddle_angle.html

OldePhart
09-29-2011, 12:45 PM
Here is a link explaining a compensated saddle for guitars where it is even more crucial due to the greater string length.... http://www.lutherie.net/saddle_angle.html

Actually, I find just the opposite - shorter scales are much more sensitive to where the string breaks over the saddle. I've compensated several saddles. On a Kala pocket uke (10" scale) I was able to get perfect intonation from a really poor start. On various concert-scale (15") ukes I've had fair results, but on tenors the saddle blank is not thick enough to make a really significant difference in the intonation. On some acoustic guitars the top of the saddle is molded so parts actually hang over the basic saddle part that fits in the bridge slot. I've been tempted to glue up a T shaped saddle for my tenors so I can get better intonation.

John

olgoat52
09-29-2011, 06:08 PM
Gluing sounds like a safer idea. A previous poster did a "T" saddle but was under cutting the saddle blank with a router or something. Scared the snot out of me... I have a uke that could use that level of attention. But it's a soprano so I don't take to to seriously.. (Just kidding there.)


Actually, I find just the opposite - shorter scales are much more sensitive to where the string breaks over the saddle. I've compensated several saddles. On a Kala pocket uke (10" scale) I was able to get perfect intonation from a really poor start. On various concert-scale (15") ukes I've had fair results, but on tenors the saddle blank is not thick enough to make a really significant difference in the intonation. On some acoustic guitars the top of the saddle is molded so parts actually hang over the basic saddle part that fits in the bridge slot. I've been tempted to glue up a T shaped saddle for my tenors so I can get better intonation.

John

Mandarb
10-02-2011, 07:51 AM
Actually, I find just the opposite - shorter scales are much more sensitive to where the string breaks over the saddle. I've compensated several saddles. On a Kala pocket uke (10" scale) I was able to get perfect intonation from a really poor start. On various concert-scale (15") ukes I've had fair results, but on tenors the saddle blank is not thick enough to make a really significant difference in the intonation. On some acoustic guitars the top of the saddle is molded so parts actually hang over the basic saddle part that fits in the bridge slot. I've been tempted to glue up a T shaped saddle for my tenors so I can get better intonation.

John

Ok. I was just trying to help the OP and explain about a compensated saddle which is why I posted a link. I probably should have also posted these links as well which were recently posted discussing compensated saddles and string length....

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?52456-what-do-you-think-of-this-action-too-high-just-right-what&highlight=compensated+saddles

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?52606-Compensated-saddle-and-low-g&highlight=compensated+saddles