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View Full Version : Those rubber hose thingies for Uke Hangers



Vic D
09-30-2011, 04:27 PM
You know what I'm talking about, those rubber hose thingies that go over bolts to make a hanger for ukes. Where would one find those things cheap? I wanna cut me a surfboard or two out of plywood and paint them up then put a dozen or so hangers on it.

So, does anyone know a good source for the rubber tubes and bolts? Or even the U hangers if they're cheap enough by the dozen.

Trinimon
09-30-2011, 05:11 PM
Depending on the diameter of your bolts/hangers, you can use black surgical tubing like the ones they use for spearfishing.

http://www.reefscuba.com/surgical_tubing.htm

I think others have bought small tool hangers from Home Depot or Lowes that are already rubber coated and fit the uke necks perfectly.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-30-2011, 05:32 PM
I used surgical tubing because it's commonly available here for use on Hawaiian slings. But you can use fuel line or any of the black tubing sold in various diameters at Home Depot.

Chris Tarman
09-30-2011, 05:36 PM
You could also go to a tropical fish store and use the clear tubing made for aquariums. Last time I checked, it was available in different diameters, and is pretty soft and flexible.

Vic D
09-30-2011, 09:16 PM
I was thinking about that foamy stuff you see on those store bought jobs but... Surgical tubing... that sounds like something that wouldn't harm a finish. I'll give that a go.

gioconbrio
10-04-2011, 04:15 AM
I just finished my instrument wall. I used U-hooks and black vinyl piping from the plumbing section of the hardware store.

hoosierhiver
10-04-2011, 05:49 AM
Call String Swing, maybe they can make you a deal.

SailingUke
10-04-2011, 05:54 AM
I like clear tubing available by the foot at Home Depot, Lowes, etc.
Comes in many diameters.

Rick Turner
10-04-2011, 12:14 PM
Just make sure that if your instrument finish is nitro lacquer, that you do not use vinyl or any other plastic or rubber-like material that might react with lacquer...and that covers a lot of materials. Clip on tuner companies and capo companies have been bitten in the butt a lot of times on this issue. Ditto with the brief craze of vinyl guitar straps...many a ruined Martin did I see. Nothing like an accessory or device that ruins finishes to ruin your day.

hmgberg
10-04-2011, 01:28 PM
Just make sure that if your instrument finish is nitro lacquer, that you do not use vinyl or any other plastic or rubber-like material that might react with lacquer...and that covers a lot of materials. Clip on tuner companies and capo companies have been bitten in the butt a lot of times on this issue. Ditto with the brief craze of vinyl guitar straps...many a ruined Martin did I see. Nothing like an accessory or device that ruins finishes to ruin your day.

Be very careful:

http://www.frets.com/fretspages/Musician/GenMaint/Vinyl/vinyl.html

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-04-2011, 01:51 PM
Your good instruments should be kept in their cases and not hung on the wall anyway.
And if it's junk ukes you're hanging on the wall, who cares? Just drill a hole through the neck and nail it to the wall.

jackwhale
10-04-2011, 02:15 PM
hmgberg: Thanks for the link. At the end there is mention of 'bug spray' adversely effecting nitro finish. I was attacked by insects last spring and sprayed myself with bug spray. Even though my hands seemed dry afterward, I noticed later that week that the finish on the neck on my 000-28 had spots where the finish had been removed. It now looks like I have been playing it for 50 years. Not good but I learned a lesson.

Rick Turner
10-04-2011, 03:16 PM
Chuck, with the mild climate we have here, I have all of my instruments...new and vintage...hanging where I can see them and enjoy them and pick them off the wall and play them. Some instruments actually do much better outside of a cases, particularly those with celluloid binding, pickguards, nitro finish and nickel or nickel plated metal parts. Celluloid and nitro break down and in enclose spaces like cases, one of the components of that is nitric acid which does indeed attack both wood and metal parts. I've seen a lot of this on vintage instruments. There are also wear patterns that show up on old instruments that go in and out of cases; you'll see this more on old violins...ones 100 or more years old, but it will happen on fretted instruments, too.

Out of sight, out of mind, and I prefer mine in sight and of mind, and can see no harm done.

On stands is another story, though...I've seen some horrific damage from rampaging kids and dogs...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-04-2011, 03:35 PM
Chuck, with the mild climate we have here, I have all of my instruments...new and vintage...hanging where I can see them and enjoy them and pick them off the wall and play them. Some instruments actually do much better outside of a cases, particularly those with celluloid binding, pickguards, nitro finish and nickel or nickel plated metal parts. Celluloid and nitro break down and in enclose spaces like cases, one of the components of that is nitric acid which does indeed attack both wood and metal parts. I've seen a lot of this on vintage instruments. There are also wear patterns that show up on old instruments that go in and out of cases; you'll see this more on old violins...ones 100 or more years old, but it will happen on fretted instruments, too.

Out of sight, out of mind, and I prefer mine in sight and of mind, and can see no harm done.

On stands is another story, though...I've seen some horrific damage from rampaging kids and dogs...

And then there's that protective layer of dust that tends to collect on wall hangers......

While your climate, like mine here, may be somewhat unique, we also share another unique phenomenon....earthquakes. Any wall hanger should be of the locking variety. A well known luthier here had half a dozen guitars jump off the wall during or 2008 earthquake. He should've known better.

thistle3585
10-04-2011, 04:13 PM
I thought I'd get organized once and put up six hangers that I got from the hardware store to hang instruments on as I worked them through the assembly process. After two days, I pulled them off and had ridges on either side of the headstock where they were resting on the hooks. I ended up wrapping the hooks in blue painter tape. How do you guys store in process works especially those that have 1-2 week old nitro on them?

olgoat52
10-04-2011, 04:38 PM
Your good instruments should be kept in their cases and not hung on the wall anyway.
And if it's junk ukes you're hanging on the wall, who cares? Just drill a hole through the neck and nail it to the wall.

Is the hole through the neck and orderable option for the Moore Bettahs?? That cracked me up.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-04-2011, 04:56 PM
Is the hole through the neck and orderable option for the Moore Bettahs?? That cracked me up.

The third fret marker is actually a plug. You pop it out and it reveals a hole, perfect for driving a 20 penny nail through.

itsme
10-04-2011, 05:40 PM
Your good instruments should be kept in their cases and not hung on the wall anyway.
Amen to that!

I'm contemplating putting a hook on the wall as a temporary holding device when I take a bio break, but all of my ukes go back in their cases when I'm done playing them.

Rick Turner
10-04-2011, 06:53 PM
Your instruments should be just like you...

Well hung...

hoosierhiver
10-05-2011, 05:15 AM
Chuck, with the mild climate we have here, I have all of my instruments...new and vintage...hanging where I can see them and enjoy them and pick them off the wall and play them. Some instruments actually do much better outside of a cases, particularly those with celluloid binding, pickguards, nitro finish and nickel or nickel plated metal parts. Celluloid and nitro break down and in enclose spaces like cases, one of the components of that is nitric acid which does indeed attack both wood and metal parts. I've seen a lot of this on vintage instruments. There are also wear patterns that show up on old instruments that go in and out of cases; you'll see this more on old violins...ones 100 or more years old, but it will happen on fretted instruments, too.

Out of sight, out of mind, and I prefer mine in sight and of mind, and can see no harm done.

On stands is another story, though...I've seen some horrific damage from rampaging kids and dogs...

Having a uke hanging in plain sight and easy reach encourages me to pick it up more frequently for sure.

gioconbrio
10-06-2011, 04:28 AM
Just make sure that if your instrument finish is nitro lacquer, that you do not use vinyl or any other plastic or rubber-like material that might react with lacquer...and that covers a lot of materials. Clip on tuner companies and capo companies have been bitten in the butt a lot of times on this issue. Ditto with the brief craze of vinyl guitar straps...many a ruined Martin did I see. Nothing like an accessory or device that ruins finishes to ruin your day.

Wow, thanks for that head's up. Fortunately, most of my instruments are covered in spray paint. Does anyone know what kind of finish Lanikai uses, however?