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View Full Version : Need info (any) on building long neck concert ukulele



PelicanUkuleles
10-05-2011, 07:36 AM
I need information on scale length concerning the bridge placement for a concert "longneck" ukulele build.
I am under the impression, for a longneck concert ukulele, that one just sets the bridge at the same distance as you would a tenor neck and bridge. That for all intents and purposes the only thing different is the concert body instead of a tenor body.
I'm assuming that the sound hole remains in the same position as one would expect from concert ukulele plans. Is this correct? Or should I be aware of other considerations? Is this approach the same for all "Longneck applications?
Any and all help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,

Don:cool:
PelicanUkuleles

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-05-2011, 08:01 AM
A tenor scale is a tenor scale regardless of the body size. Where you join the neck will determine your bridge placement. A tenor neck will usually locate a bridge pretty far down the bout on a concert.

ksquine
10-05-2011, 08:44 AM
The bridge position is all based on scale length. Measure the distance from the nut to the 12th fret and double it to get the scale length. Then go to a fret calculator to see how much compensation you'll need. Here's a good one.... http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/Fretting/i-fretcalc.html

Are you building the body or converting a concert? You'll want to know the bridge position first to position the braces and bridge patch correctly.

Pete Howlett
10-05-2011, 10:03 AM
I've mever understood these long neck instruments. What is the advantage?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-05-2011, 10:17 AM
I've mever understood these long neck instruments. What is the advantage?

Hah! My exact feelings but I don't want to discourage anyone from building them. I think some people are attracted to the sound of a smaller bodied uke but want more fret spacing for ease of playing. My own thought is that you can get used to any uke after a couple of hours of playing. I prefer to build traditional models otherwise you're always compromising somewhere.

Rob-C
10-05-2011, 10:20 AM
What is the advantage?

To have the characteristic sound of the smaller instrument, but with extra frets for widdling / more finger space at the nut end, I guess.

(Crossed with Chuck's post).

Allen
10-05-2011, 11:00 AM
Back to the question.

Get out your pencil and paper and sketch out the body size exactly as you are building. Locate the centre of the lower bout where the bridge / saddle should be. Now measure from the saddle out to where the nut will be based on your scale length. From there you can measure back to determine what fret the neck will join the body, as well as determining how many frets in total you will want. This also gives you a placement for the sound hole. Also note where your bridge patch and any bracing will need to be.

You can adjust these measurements a tiny bit so the fret to body join works out to being on the 12th, 13th or 14th fret for aesthetics sake. But that is pretty much the way about it.

PelicanUkuleles
10-05-2011, 11:06 AM
Thanks very much everyone. Your tips made it clear.
I was interested in building one because the client loves the ukulele and plays the concert size. Just as a natural progression for him I thought it would be nice to have a tenor neck on the concert body to accommodate his large hands. That's basically it.
Also, I have a koa (concert size) back & sides set as well as a tenor neck and a slotted tenor fingerboard on hand that I wanted to make use of. I don't want the instrument to be unbalanced (too top heavy at the headstock) though, so I might stick with a traditionally sized tenor.
Thank you again for your time and thoughts. :cool:

Don

PelicanUkuleles
10-05-2011, 11:11 AM
Back to the question.

Get out your pencil and paper and sketch out the body size exactly as you are building. Locate the centre of the lower bout where the bridge / saddle should be. Now measure from the saddle out to where the nut will be based on your scale length. From there you can measure back to determine what fret the neck will join the body, as well as determining how many frets in total you will want. This also gives you a placement for the sound hole. Also note where your bridge patch and any bracing will need to be.

You can adjust these measurements a tiny bit so the fret to body join works out to being on the 12th, 13th or 14th fret for aesthetics sake. But that is pretty much the way about it.

Awesome! Thank you Allen, for taking the time to post that useful information. :cool:

Don