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notalent31
10-05-2011, 10:30 AM
I'm assuming that if I string a baritone uke with GCEA strings that I"ll have no problem playing it properly in the GCEA mode?

southcoastukes
10-05-2011, 10:45 AM
Truth be told, there are really no such things as "GCEA" strings. If you have a set that gives good tension tuned to key of C (that is to say: G"C"EA) on a soprano, those strings will be way too taught on a Baritone unless you lower the tuning.

For key of C on a Baritone, you need strings designed for that purpose.

jackwhale
10-05-2011, 10:57 AM
I bought Aquilla strings designed for the purpose but most string manufacturers make strings for tuning a baritone to GCEA tuning. I decided to go back to regular baritone DGBE strings but the GCEA strings worked fine on my baritone.

bdukes
10-05-2011, 11:06 AM
I'm assuming that if I string a baritone uke with GCEA strings that I"ll have no problem playing it properly in the GCEA mode?

No problem at all. I have my Favilla Baritone strung with Southcoast's linear set tuned to GCEA and they work fine. I haven't tried any other of GCEA sets designed for baritone but by all accounts here, it's done all the time. I really like my baritone tuned to C. Enjoy.

SailingUke
10-05-2011, 11:49 AM
I used Aquila GCEA on a baritone, but went back to DGBE, I missed that deep growl of a baritone.

notalent31
10-05-2011, 12:12 PM
Your reply was just about the only positive one, unless I misunderstand the other replys.

My reason for using GCEA strings on a baritone is that many of the songs available to me are all in GCEA tuning and not DGBE like my baritone is. So, I thought by purchasing another baritone uke and using the GCEA strings, that I could then play all those songs written for a uke tuned to GCEA? Am I wrong?..

I already have a baritone uke that I like very much. I do prefer the "deeper" tones I get from the baritone. So, I would guess by putting GCEA strings on a baritone uke, I'd then get the deeper uke tone that I like.

Please correct me if I"m wrong. Some of the other replies I've gotten here don't seem to agree with my thoughts on this. I sure could use some more info on this.

jackwhale
10-05-2011, 01:07 PM
I didn't think my Pono baritone with GCEA strings sounded as good as tenor ukes I have played...didn't have as much 'ring' as a Lanikai laminated tenor I borrowed. Although it sounded fine I didn't play it much so I changed back to baritone strings.

I have played guitars for quite a while and thus used to be somewhat of a baritone 'snob'. I've grown to like the sound of a regular uke, so I recently ordered a tenor uke. It definitely will be nice to skip transposing chord shapes on the fly when playing music written with GCEA chording.

mds725
10-05-2011, 01:20 PM
Your reply was just about the only positive one, unless I misunderstand the other replys.

My reason for using GCEA strings on a baritone is that many of the songs available to me are all in GCEA tuning and not DGBE like my baritone is. So, I thought by purchasing another baritone uke and using the GCEA strings, that I could then play all those songs written for a uke tuned to GCEA? Am I wrong?..

I already have a baritone uke that I like very much. I do prefer the "deeper" tones I get from the baritone. So, I would guess by putting GCEA strings on a baritone uke, I'd then get the deeper uke tone that I like.

Please correct me if I"m wrong. Some of the other replies I've gotten here don't seem to agree with my thoughts on this. I sure could use some more info on this.

You CAN tune a baritone ukulele to GCEA. The point some people were trying to make is that you can't just go out and buy any strings and tune them to GCEA; you have to buy strings specifically made to be tuned to GCEA on a baritone ukulele. A baritoned tuned to GCEA will sound sort of like a deeper tenor, in the way that a tenor sounds a bit deeper than a concert, because of the longer string length and the bigger soundbox. There's really no mystery. Just find strings that are made for a baritone and made for GCEA tuning. Southcoast makes great GCEA baritone strings, but you can also get them from Aquila.

kissing
10-05-2011, 01:46 PM
Yes, just re-iterating, you have to use the right strings for the job.
You can't just slap on a soprano, concert or tenor string set on a baritone and expect it to work.

What I wonder is why Aquila don't have a baritone GCEA set with a low-G.
You would think on a baritone size, a low-G would make sense. But no, they only have the re-entrant set widely available.

southcoastukes
10-05-2011, 02:41 PM
Truth be told, there are really no such things as "GCEA" strings...

I caused a bit of confusion here - my apologies. I knew that Aquila had a high re-entrant set for C tuning on a Baritone, but fogot that they actually do call it "Baritone GCEA".

What I was trying to say is what kissing said much better just above.

kissing - I'm not sure why more people don't offer the low G string set-up on a Baritone. It's actually a better fit there than on a Tenor (and also a much better sound on a Baritone than the high re-entrant). I'm pretty sure we were the first, and still the only.

talent, whether you choose a high re-entrant set like Aquila, or a low 4th set from us, you'll play everyting the same way and in the same pitch as C tuning on a Soprano.

The low 4th is the better choice in my view, not only because it sounds better on a Baritone, but gives you two more distict sounds to play with & two instruments with different options when it comes to picking.

TCK
10-05-2011, 02:48 PM
I agree with all said on the Low fourth string for Baritone. I first tuned my Bari to C6 because my wife watches my hands when she is learning and could not do so when I played Bari. I originally used Aquilla high re-entrant strings and the Bari lost all of it's boom and sparkle.
I then tried Southcoast linear strings and I love them- low G gives the proper amount of boom and they sustain forever. I find I like them better than standard Baritone now as I found the 3rd and 4th Bari strings (often wound) to be too over-powering of the top end.
That said, you can play any GCEA tune on a Bari, and even use the chord shapes you find in books, the tune will just be lower. You can also ignore the chord diagrams and buy a cool little stamp that will allow you put your own in.

spookefoote
10-06-2011, 06:52 AM
I've been here before follow this thread. I use Guadalupe GCEA one octave below strings. They are in my opinion the canine's sphericals.

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?49608-Baritone-Strings-What-are-you-using

marymac
10-14-2011, 08:55 PM
I have the silver-plated copper version of the Guadalupe one octave below GCEA strings on my Mainland Mahogany bari thanks to Mark. When I put them on yesterday they didn't sound too hot but after a day of settling in they sound pretty good. I had the brass plated ones before (on my deep-bodied koa bari) and and they never seemed to settle in; they always sounded muddy when strummed. Sounded good when picked though. The silver coated seems to be a much better fit for the baritone.

I'm planning to leave these on for a while to see how it goes. I previously had the Southcoast linears on the Mainland and those sounded great too. I like the deep sound of the one octave below strings a lot though - sounds very guitary (which I like).