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View Full Version : This could have been bad... Mahogany uke patched due to slip of the bit.



Vic D
10-10-2011, 01:15 PM
Here we have another booboo in a recent line of booboos that want to drag me down but I refuse. I can't afford not to sell it so don't shoot me if it goes cheap. I finished the binding channel and came upstairs to put the end graft in. I went back down to the shop to clean up the channel around the end graft and as soon as I made the first pass I knew it was working on too much wood... I shut the router ( harbor freight orange job ) off and looked and saw the bit had dropped down about a quarter inch, probably after I had finished the binding channel before and turned it on and off a couple of times because I thought it sounded a bit chatty. I should count myself lucky, it could have been my hand/fingers instead of the uke.

So there it is, I patched it but I didn't have any of the original wood from this uke and you see the patch when the light hits it right. The repair is solid.

The other photos are from my nifty new go bars... oak sticks from a discarded towel rack and slices of pvc pipe, also found. The go bar deck was saved from a dumpster. Total cost probably about a buck for the screws. They work awsome, very solid. The last photo is a pizza I made the other night. It's much better than Papa John's pizza...

28807288082880928806

Vic D
10-10-2011, 01:21 PM
By the way, that top with the braces being glued is going on my personal uke. It's a top from when I first started and figured it was too thin. It's a very very tight grained sitka and the uke itself is going to be a liquorice all sorts, mahogany and poplar sides, aromatic red cedar back spanish cedar neck.. all very thin including the braces which is why I've got the sound hole patch to stiffen the top. I wouldn't sell one like this lol.. it just might collapse.

Well I take that back. If someone wanted a really lightweight uke I'd build it for them, but not with any kind of guarantee lol. My regular ukes are already pushing the boundaries.

arpie
10-10-2011, 01:23 PM
Good luck on the repair job! Well done on making your own equipment with 'left overs'! Very innovative!

LOVE the pizza!! We make our own too! YUM! :D

Roberta

Vic D
10-10-2011, 01:33 PM
Good luck on the repair job! Well done on making your own equipment with 'left overs'! Very innovative!

LOVE the pizza!! We make our own too! YUM! :D

Roberta


Thank you, Roberta! Yep, homemade pizza is da bomb!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-10-2011, 01:36 PM
Looks like a good patch but errors like that are usually an occasion for some creative inlay work.
How did you do your crust?

Vic D
10-10-2011, 01:47 PM
Yep, I'm thinking of making it a feature with the creative end graft inlay work.

The crust:
1 1/2 cups bread flower
1 cup all purpose flower ( i know it's not weighed, if too wet add more flower while kneeding)
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp salt
1 packet instant yeast
1 1/2 cups hot water (between 120-130 degrees)

Add sugar and yeast to hot water in a bowl and make sure it blooms
add water to the flour and mix ( I use a big spoon )
once ya get a good ball going throw it on a floured board and need it another five minutes then
smear olive oil all over the inside of a bowl and plop the dough in.
Place bowl on top of your ancient CRT computer monitor for the warmth, cover with clean towel and let it rise an hour to and hour
and a half.
Throw the risen dough on a floured board and kneed it some more then shape it out however you do it, roll it with a pin or whatever. Then make several pokes in the top of the crust with a fork and lay your sauce/toppings on. brush the crust with olive oil and bake.

And yes, that's ONE BIG PIZZA.. or you can make two regular sized pizzas.

itsme
10-10-2011, 02:49 PM
That pizza looks delicious! :drool:

I make my own, too, but am too lazy to do the crust from scratch. Trader Joe's sells a pretty good pizza dough ($1.29 for a 16-oz bag that's enough for one large pizza). Comes in plain, garlic&herb or whole wheat. :)

Doug
10-10-2011, 04:05 PM
Looks like a good save Vic. Dressing it up is a good idea too. I've read on the net several times where someone had the collet slip and ruin wood. Most of the time it was the same router.

Pete Howlett
10-10-2011, 04:17 PM
If it 'grins' there is always the 'Gibson solution'. Spray it black :)

Flyfish57
10-11-2011, 02:29 AM
Just keep the pizza away from your unfinished ukes!

erich@muttcrew.net
10-11-2011, 09:09 AM
Love the inlay on that pizzalele, Vic :)

Vic D
10-13-2011, 06:08 PM
Just keep the pizza away from your unfinished ukes!

I know, right. No more building ukes in the kitchen! lol.

Vic D
10-13-2011, 06:13 PM
Love the inlay on that pizzalele, Vic :)

Hahaha, yeah we loved it too. The strings of cheese were even better than Aquilas.

Vic D
10-13-2011, 06:18 PM
Me make boo boo a feature now. Gonna give the bridge, headstock and fretboard the same red/black treatment. Still need to dress it up and put the binding in.. gotta pick up some more sandpaper sheesh I go through that stuff.

I'm thinking the pores need to be darkened a bit when I grain fill. What do you guys use to tint your grain filler?

P.S. I'm trying to find red Aurora (dyed Aquila) strings. The nice folks at the factory said they'd see what they can do but I was wondering if any of you guys know a source.

28884

dustartist
10-13-2011, 08:13 PM
Unfortunately, I have had a bit slip lower in the collet before too. I was lucky it was a hinge mortise on a door, so I just shimmed it flush. Now I always tighten the shit out of my router bits...

Vic D
10-14-2011, 07:27 AM
Unfortunately, I have had a bit slip lower in the collet before too. I was lucky it was a hinge mortise on a door, so I just shimmed it flush. Now I always tighten the shit out of my router bits...

Yeah, I shimmed this uke flush too but it was ugly lol. There was mention of this particular router in another thread a while back and how a bit dropped out of the collet and injured one of the member's hand. That was after I had mentioned that I felt the need to crank down on it because it just didn't feel right unless I did. Evidently I didn't crank down on it enough and I'll crank it down good until I get a better router.

So, heads up to all those using this cheapie orange trim router... crank it down tight.

erich@muttcrew.net
10-14-2011, 08:17 AM
My guys have such a loving way of saying "Are you kidding? It's a feature!" It really helps.

Some boo boo you got to fix, some you got to polish up a bit, some you just got to love.....

joejeweler
10-14-2011, 08:52 AM
My guys have such a loving way of saying "Are you kidding? It's a feature!" It really helps.

Some boo boo you got to fix, some you got to polish up a bit, some you just got to love.....

You mean like this? :D

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb200/joejeweler/Willie%20Nelson/Willie_UK2K7_2.jpg

http://i204.photobucket.com/albums/bb200/joejeweler/Willie%20Nelson/WillieNelson_Trigger.jpg

erich@muttcrew.net
10-14-2011, 09:19 AM
Hey, where die you get that picture of me..... oh sorry, that's someone else's guitar - mine has "deal with it" carved into it ;)

joejeweler
10-14-2011, 02:43 PM
Hey, where die you get that picture of me..... oh sorry, that's someone else's guitar - mine has "deal with it" carved into it ;)

Hehe,....brings a whole new meaning to an instrument "Opening Up"! :o

Tarhead
10-15-2011, 12:10 PM
Vic I'm glad it didn't slip out any further. I use a Space Ball (rubber BB for spacing floating cabinet panels) to prevent the bit from bottoming out when tightining.
I won't say anything about that router but you know what I think about Horror Freight.