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garyg
10-27-2011, 02:40 AM
Greetings ukers, I teach a large (140 student) non-science majors class in Georgia Natural History (think of the birds and bees of the south or ecology for art majors). With a class that large one has to use innovative teaching methods and I was thinking of getting some of my uke friends together and giving a class concert of traditional songs that feature biological themes or describe natural features of the landscape (think The Cuckoo, Bluebird song, etc.). Because this is Georgia, I stretch the geographical limit a bit to include the southern Appalachians and perhaps the Gulf Coast, but the biological/geographic component should be the focus of the song. The point here is to show how the landscape/biota influenced the people of the region. So I'm looking for songs with uke arrangements that fit these criteria. I'd appreciate any arrangements that you'd care to provide, and any song suggestions even if you don't have an arrangement. I would classify myself as an advanced beginner (i.e., I can play E minor and B flat well but have trouble getting from E to any other chord <g> and I don't pick yet. TIA, g2

Dougf
10-27-2011, 03:53 AM
This is certainly not a traditional song, but it has a fair amount of biology in it (think birds and bees at the microscopic level). Hope it isn't too risque'. :)

Great idea for your class, good luck, and have fun!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYFTB_yelYQ

Ukulele JJ
10-27-2011, 05:11 AM
There's always this one... :-)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXYKGL6MgKM

JJ

Lori
10-27-2011, 06:21 AM
This one is nice on the uke. More like astronomy than geology though
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=buqtdpuZxvk
http://www.alligatorboogaloo.com/uke/tabs/020622.html

The Lion Sleeps Tonight is a good one. Any Lions in Georgia? F, Bflat, F, C7
This Land is Your Land is also a good uke song (easy to google for chords)
Good luck with your class.
–Lori

Ambient Doughnut
10-27-2011, 06:26 AM
That's brilliant Doug! You write that? :)

Dougf
10-27-2011, 07:58 AM
That's brilliant Doug! You write that? :)

Thanks. Yeah, that's my baby. :)

cantsing
10-28-2011, 03:43 AM
The History of Everthing isn't a traditional song, but it covers some natural history:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aym8_S3BXKw


Chords: http://www.ukulele-tabs.com/uke-songs/barenaked-ladies/big-bang-theory-theme-uke-tab-18449.html

garyg
10-28-2011, 07:52 AM
Okay maybe I should restate my request, I am looking for uke arrangements for traditional ballads over the period ranging from settlement in North America to the early 20th century that focus on some aspect of wildlife, botany, geography. For example The Cuckoo is a perfect example of what I am looking for. Songs about a particular wildflower or animal or southern mountain range or river. What I am trying to find are songs that document how the flora and fauna and geographic features of the southeastern US influenced the people sufficiently that they wrote music about it. TIA, g2

PoiDog
10-28-2011, 07:54 AM
This is certainly not a traditional song, but it has a fair amount of biology in it (think birds and bees at the microscopic level). Hope it isn't too risque'. :)

Great idea for your class, good luck, and have fun!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYFTB_yelYQ

Go Bears!
Nice to see another Old Blue here.

Dougf
10-28-2011, 08:26 AM
Okay maybe I should restate my request, I am looking for uke arrangements for traditional ballads over the period ranging from settlement in North America to the early 20th century that focus on some aspect of wildlife, botany, geography. For example The Cuckoo is a perfect example of what I am looking for. Songs about a particular wildflower or animal or southern mountain range or river. What I am trying to find are songs that document how the flora and fauna and geographic features of the southeastern US influenced the people sufficiently that they wrote music about it. TIA, g2

Cumberland Gap, a geographic feature that is perhaps unrivaled in significance in the westward migration through the Appalachians.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumberland_Gap_%28folk_song%29

Dougf
10-28-2011, 08:32 AM
Go Bears!
Nice to see another Old Blue here.

Yeah! Go Bears! I'm class of '79, and my daughter is on track to graduate class of '13!

mds725
10-28-2011, 11:08 AM
Would something like this help?

http://www.nps.gov/miss/forteachers/upload/Songs%20of%20the%20Mississippi%20River.pdf

peterp
10-28-2011, 05:07 PM
Ulili E is a song about the wandering tattler and golden plover. You can find this in He Mele Aloha songbook. Also sung by Iz in Alone in Iz World.

mm stan
10-28-2011, 05:56 PM
I know eugene ukulele has a few bird songs..

mds725
10-28-2011, 09:11 PM
Ulili E is a song about the wandering tattler and golden plover. You can find this in He Mele Aloha songbook. Also sung by Iz in Alone in Iz World.

There are lots of Hawaiian songs about the geography and flora and fauna of Hawai'i. Another one that comes to mind is Na Moku Eha (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7NrZjjOk-U), which identifies a flower indigenous to, and the biggest mountain on, each of O'ahu, Kaua'i, Maui and the Big Island. I was under the impression the OP wanted similar traditional songs about the geography, flora and fauna of the Southeast United States.

Ken Middleton
10-28-2011, 09:21 PM
Home on the Range immediately springs to mind, but that is Kansas and may be too far west. What about all the Wildwood songs? Wildwood Flower for instance. Red River Valley is about nature but not many animals or plants in it. It is too early in the morning to think of others but there are lots.

mds725
10-29-2011, 12:07 AM
"The Old Grey Mare" is considered by some to be a traditional Appalachian song (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_music). I'm not sure if you consider the Appalachian regions to be too far away from the geographical area you're interested in.

garyg
10-29-2011, 02:24 AM
Okay, we're getting closer but I wasn't thinking of Hawa'ii when I said southeastern US and yes the Appalachians, pronounced "appa latch ans" are probably the most crucial geographic area because they are the backbone of traditional folk music in the southeast and in fact the whole US. Oh and let's leave all the "Go Bears" posts for a post entitled "Why do so many Cal grads play the uke" signed class of '75. I'm having trouble downloading the Park Service "Songs of the Mississippi" pdf but that looks like exactly what I'm looking for albeit a bit west. I'll check Jon's CD's for songs, he does have the cuckoo and hopefully some others. Thanks for the suggestions. g2

Dougf
10-29-2011, 03:52 AM
My apologies for the "go bears" post, just having a little fun, but I hope you did see my suggestion about "Cumberland Gap".

PoiDog
10-29-2011, 04:40 AM
Ditto ... didn't mean to offend with my Go Bears ... just nice to see some Old Blues here.

garyg
10-29-2011, 05:37 AM
Yeah, Cumberland Gap is the type of song that I'm looking for but aside from the Park Service book, there seem to be few suggestions that would work for a university class. Guess that I'm disappointed that there are more viable suggestions. cheers, g2

hoosierhiver
10-29-2011, 05:53 AM
Ol' Slew Foot?

peterp
10-30-2011, 04:53 AM
Looks like I get a failing grade for not following the teachers instructions. (I tend to look at the topic titles and skip the long posts.)
Swanee River's lyrics are more cultural than natural. Georgia On My Mind has a reference to "moonlight through the pines", but my arrangement has a ninth chord.

garyg
10-30-2011, 05:22 AM
@Pete, yeah you know as a professor, I was tempted to post something to the effect of "please read the syllabus before you post class" but I restrained myself. I figured that those Cal alumni posters got off track because of all the dope they smoked in Berkeley, but I was tolerant because I went there too <g>. This does seem to be a difficult assignment and that's a shame but perhaps I need to write some of my own songs. I know there has to be material out there, I just haven't been very successful using a wide variety of google search strings. C'est la vie. g2

Ukulele JJ
10-30-2011, 03:00 PM
but perhaps I need to write some of my own songs.

Or you could split the difference and change the lyrics of existing songs. That might actually be funnier/more memorable. There are tons of songs about Georgia (The Devil Went Down to Georgia, The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia, Georgia On My Mind*, etc.), and you'd just have to tweak the lyrics a bit to suit your purposes.

JJ


* Technically about a woman named Georgia, and not the state, but close enough...

peewee
10-30-2011, 06:06 PM
Peach Pickin' Time in Georgia:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgL11ITUlcA
http://www.classic-country-song-lyrics.com/peachpickingtimedowningeorgialyricschords.html
Not quite natural history, but close.

olgoat52
10-30-2011, 06:10 PM
Ol' Slew Foot?

If Mike suggests it, it's good so ya better do that one!!

TCK
10-30-2011, 07:44 PM
None of these are "uke" songs per say (but all would lend themselves to the uke easily), but they are Natural History tunes...I thought I was the last one?
I collect Western Swing and these pop right to mind
Blue Bonnet Lane- Bob Wills
Dusty Skies- Bob Wills
Back Home Again in Indiana- Bob Wills or Bill Boyd...or lots of others
Whippoorwill waltz- Spade Cooley

I am sure their are a lot of other ones, but It is just about bedtime- I will scour tomorrow-
A contemporary tune that fits your needs to a T would be Acony Bell by Mrs. Gillian Welch- probably ought to check that one an don't worry about traditional as it is perfect.

TCK
10-30-2011, 07:51 PM
How did I forget
Silver Dew on the Blue Grass tonight?- Bob Wills (I guess you can tell what I collect a lot of)
Weeping Willow Tree- Bill Monroe
Sold Down The River
Big Sandy River
Wildwood FLower- Carter Family
The Birds were singing of you- Carter Family

Like I said, I probably have a lot more, and I consider all music to be uke music. Hit me if you want me to really dig

Dougf
10-31-2011, 03:45 AM
I figured that those Cal alumni posters got off track because of all the dope they smoked in Berkeley, but I was tolerant because I went there too <g>.

That's pretty harsh, especially since I think I contributed a pretty decent suggestion, "Cumberland Gap". You might have said "thanks", but instead you insulted me. But that's cool, man, and just to show there are no hard feelings, I've got another suggestion in the "geographic feature" category that also seems quite appropriate given my alleged diminished capacity due to illicit combustible substances: "On Top Of Old Smoky".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Top_of_Old_Smoky

garyg
10-31-2011, 03:49 AM
@Doug, aw come on, it was just a joke and it had <g> this behind it to indicate that it was a joke and I think that I did thank you or at least acknowledge that your suggestion was perfect by posting "Yeah, Cumberland Gap is the type of song that I'm looking for ". But sorry if I offended you. Different people have different senses of humor. onwards and upwards, g2

Ambient Doughnut
10-31-2011, 03:53 AM
Must admit the <g> tag to indicate joke is a new one on me. This thread makes a lot more sense with that knowledge.
I thought it was all about to kick off!

<g>

;)

garyg
10-31-2011, 03:59 AM
The <g> actually stands for grin to indicate that you're being facetious, teasing, or joking.

Dougf
10-31-2011, 04:14 AM
As I said, Gary, it's cool. I didn't understand the <g> tag, but I figured it was probably a joke, and I just thought I'd play it a bit further. And it sounds like with TCK's ideas, you'll have some pretty good material. Try to get some video of your performance, should be fun.