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Braden
10-30-2011, 10:27 PM
I've found some discussions regarding side sound ports, but none so far that answer my specific question:

Can a sound port be sufficient for a concert-size uke and eliminate the need for a hole on the soundboard itself?

All the ones I've seen so far have both.

Sorry if this has been answered and I haven't dug up that particular post.

Braden

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-31-2011, 05:44 AM
I don't see why not, it's done occasionally on Kasha style instruments.

ksquine
10-31-2011, 07:33 AM
Sure you could.....but what about the rosette?? That's the best part.
Just keep the hole area around the same size as a normal concert. You might need to make it oval shaped if your sides aren't deep enough or your linings extend down too far.

Caboose66
10-31-2011, 07:47 AM
I'm not a builder, but interested in this nonetheless. There was some discussion about addition of a side port in another thread and the advice to not increase the overall area of any sound holes too much in an instrument from what has been customary. I assume the same is true about reducing the total area of soundholes... in other words, as long as the total area of all soundholes is in the general range of a conventional instrument, you're likely to be okay?
Wouldn't it be difficult to have a single side port with the same area of the one typically cut into the soundboard? I wonder if twin side ports - maybe one on each of the upper and lower bout - might be a good idea.
Again, I'm not a builder, just interested in the topic so I might be talking out my...soundhole :eek:. I have entertained the idea of trying to build my own someday and all of this is very intriguing to me.

Dean

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
10-31-2011, 08:08 AM
I wonder if twin side ports - maybe one on each of the upper and lower bout - might be a good idea.


I have added side sound ports to both bouts before but always in conjunction with at least a minimal sound hole on the top of the uke. Make sure you brace properly to take advantage of all of the uninterrupted sound board surface. Again, you may want to research Kasha. Maybe you can elaborate on what you are trying to achieve by having no sound hole on the front of the instrument.

PhilUSAFRet
10-31-2011, 08:16 AM
Only if you are going to be the only person listening to it, or if it's acoustic electric and you will use an amp when you want others to hear it.

Braden
10-31-2011, 09:24 PM
Thanks so much for the responses, guys! I must confess, Chuck, that I was hoping to hear your thoughts. Your gallery was one of the sites I looked through. To say your work is fantastic doesn't do it justice. The inlay work is incredible.

The reason I don't want a sound hole on the top is because I want to maximize the surface of the soundboard, since I'm hoping to get a couple of signatures and a sort of logo on the top.

Also, because it'd look unique and cool, of course. ;)

So, for this particular project, a rosette isn't necessary as the logo and signatures would be the focus.

It's a personal project, so it's more of a novelty item. But I still want it to be playable. :)

joneo
11-12-2016, 12:02 PM
I know this is an old thread, but Bugs Gear is now offering a Concert sized ABS ukulele with a side port only, (no front hole) and I was wondering the same thing- does this reduce the overall sound output?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-13-2016, 01:46 PM
Sound holes are beneficial to project towards the audience, but if you dont play to an aduience or plug in and play to an audience, then no front sound hole should be fine.

Steveperrywriter
11-13-2016, 05:00 PM
Local builder Mark Roberts makes some you might find interesting.
http://www.roberts-guitars.com/t14_b14

sequoia
11-13-2016, 05:30 PM
Local builder Mark Roberts makes some you might find interesting.
http://www.roberts-guitars.com/t14_b14

Really innovative and beautiful work. Note the wild bracing scheme. Very delicate. Very out there. I would love to hear how these instruments sound. Thanks for passing that along... Some pictures below of Mark's work.

95640 95641 95642

Steveperrywriter
11-13-2016, 10:15 PM
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kgQEyy-dZxY

One of Mark's ukes.

Ukador
11-13-2016, 10:50 PM
I am wondering if it is possible to add a side sound hole after the Ukulele is finished or if this isn't really advisable due to problems with the bracing and/or stability?

I am asking as I own a concert Uke which I really enjoy and I think about pimping it with a L.R Baggs pickup and a second sound hole to the side

saltytri
11-14-2016, 03:32 AM
I am wondering if it is possible to add a side sound hole after the Ukulele is finished or if this isn't really advisable due to problems with the bracing and/or stability?

I am asking as I own a concert Uke which I really enjoy and I think about pimping it with a L.R Baggs pickup and a second sound hole to the side


The area around the side port is reinforced on the inside during construction. I use a backing that is laminated from cross-grained veneers. Without something similar, the risk is that the side will crack or deform.

joneo
11-14-2016, 05:41 AM
Sound holes are beneficial to project towards the audience, but if you dont play to an aduience or plug in and play to an audience, then no front sound hole should be fine.

Edited: Thanks - so I went out and got a BugsGear one, and just sitting around the house jamming there seems to be no diffence between that and other low-end beater ukes I have as far as overall sound produced in my living room. However, with the only sound hole facing me I did notice that the sound is perceived to be a bit louder to the player only. I suppose this would be good say if I was practicing by myself outside or something. But kinda not necessary. I think it would be better if the uke had real front F holes instead of the fake one. Also don't like the stock strings. This one did not come with a low G like some advertisements say. I guess if I was playing in front of an audience I'd probably use my Kala tenor. BTW- your products look Amazing! Very cool indeed. :-)

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-14-2016, 06:19 AM
You can cut a side post into an instrument after its built ONLY if the sides are laminated- these are usually found, somewhat ironically, only on the cheap end or the very high end of instruments.

Ukador
11-14-2016, 08:39 AM
You can cut a side post into an instrument after its built ONLY if the sides are laminated- these are usually found, somewhat ironically, only on the cheap end or the very high end of instruments.

Hmm my concert is all solid :/

Why does it only work with laminated sides ?

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-14-2016, 08:57 AM
If you do cut a hole in solid sides, you run the very big risk of the wood cracking, especially if there is still tension in the sides.

A side port needs inner reinforcement.

plastuku
01-05-2017, 05:15 PM
What about cutting a side hole into an Outdoor Uke? All glass-reinforced polycarbonate. One reviewer says his got stepped on by a horse and the only damage was broken strings. I've worked with polycarb and I could believe that. They use it for bulletproof glazing.

Also, what place would be best for a single hole? I mostly see them on the bouts, but I think the waist might spread the sound more, like a speaker cone or the bell of a horn.

Michael Smith
01-05-2017, 08:54 PM
I don't know why you couldn't glue reinforcment inside your instrument then cut a sound port. It would not be as easy as doing it ahead of time but surely could be done as long as your instrument was not finished on the insde.
If somone asked me to do it I would likely beg off but if I had to do it I would shape the support using the side curve as a template for the shape fire up the hide glue pot and stick it in there through the soud hole. Not a big deal. Then come back and cut it out with a dremel with small router bit.

If it would be a good idea or not is another matter. As in if you have too much opening your instument will start to sound thin.

Ken Franklin
01-06-2017, 05:01 AM
You can add reinforcement to a side sound port after it's made. Just cut a hole or two the size of the bolt/s you are using for clamping. Add your glued up support and clamp it with corked cauls bolted through the hole/s. Then you cut out the sound port as you normally would. Not too hard. Not always necessary though. The uke's soundhole isn't usually reinforced that way.