PDA

View Full Version : Used Performax 16-32



olgoat52
11-01-2011, 07:19 AM
Didn't want to hijack my own thread about thicknessing nuts and saddles.

Is there anything in particular to watch out for in buy a used Performax 16-32? Are there some older 16-32s to stay away from (ie design changes that were a definite improvement?)

Previous threads seem to indicate it is a more versatile choice over the Jet 10-20.

Thanks
Tim

olgoat52
11-01-2011, 07:46 AM
This is a pic of the one I was thinking about. Looks like a much older model with out the bracing of the more recent models.
29555

Edit. The bracing I was seeing look like they are for the models wider than the 16-32.

thistle3585
11-01-2011, 08:02 AM
Olgoat,
There is a guy in Chicago that sells the18x36 Palmgren sander for about $500 new. This is the same sander offered by Grizzly for $900 but under a different name. I am guessing that he imports them from the same company that makes them for Grizzly. I'm not sure what his relationship is to Palmgren, but they sell the same sander for twice the money on their site. I found him on craigslist and its a much better sander, and less expensive, than a 16-32. I like that the conveyor goes up and down instead of the sanding surface which means it wont sag like a 16-32. If you have trouble tracking him down them let me know and I'll see if I can dig up the info.

olgoat52
11-01-2011, 08:13 AM
Olgoat,
There is a guy in Chicago that sells the18x36 Palmgren sander for about $500 new. This is the same sander offered by Grizzly for $900 but under a different name. I am guessing that he imports them from the same company that makes them for Grizzly. I'm not sure what his relationship is to Palmgren, but they sell the same sander for twice the money on their site. I found him on craigslist and its a much better sander, and less expensive, than a 16-32. I like that the conveyor goes up and down instead of the sanding surface which means it wont sag like a 16-32. If you have trouble tracking him down them let me know and I'll see if I can dig up the info.

Andrew. Is this the guy by any chance. Bigger unit. A little too big for my shop but I will keep an eye out for the smaller one. http://chicago.craigslist.org/nch/tls/2675584800.html

thistle3585
11-01-2011, 09:10 AM
Yes, that is him. You might ask him if he has anything smaller, but I don't think that the footprint of the 18-36 is any bigger than the Performax. It does weigh more, but it does come with the stand and that is all you have to assemble on it. I put casters on mine in order to move it around. Grizzly has a 10-20 for $375 which is just a smaller version of the Performax. http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-Drum-Sander/G0716

Rick Turner
11-01-2011, 11:12 AM
A good friend of mine, Sandor Nagyszalanczy (uke collector and coconspiritor in Uke Ellington) has made numerous trips to Chinese tool manufacturers doing consulting and design work. He tells me that while the outward appearance of two tools may be very similar, there can be a world of difference in bearings, the actual quality of castings, hardware, and motors. Do not assume that two tools with different brands are actually the same. Go with well respected brands that have good product support.

Sandor used to be an editor at Fine Woodworking, he writes reviews, and on one trip, he was not even allowed into one of the factories supplying a well known brand mentioned here because he knows too much about what's inside the tools. Starts with a G.

olgoat52
11-01-2011, 11:16 AM
A good friend of mine, Sandor Nagyszalanczy (uke collector and coconspiritor in Uke Ellington) has made numerous trips to Chinese tool manufacturers doing consulting and design work. He tells me that while the outward appearance of two tools may be very similar, there can be a world of difference in bearings, the actual quality of castings, hardware, and motors. Do not assume that two tools with different brands are actually the same. Go with well respected brands that have good product support.

Sandor used to be an editor at Fine Woodworking, he writes reviews, and on one trip, he was not even allowed into one of the factories supplying a well known brand mentioned here because he knows too much about what's inside the tools. Starts with a G.

I have read a number of Sandor's articles over the years in Fine Woodworking. Thanks

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-01-2011, 01:59 PM
A couple of things to watch for when buying a used Performax. The conveyor belt on mine finally wore out. I replaced it with a one piece aftermarket belt that is far superior. Not cheap, close to $100. I've also worn out a couple of "spiders", the little rubber piece that fits between the coupling on the motor shaft and the drum. I've since found that the allen screws on the coupler need occasional tightening. I've used my 16/32 almost daily for the past eight years and it's worked well for me. If I had adequate electrical power I wouldn't mind moving up to the next size, (which is also a BIG jump in price.)

Kekani
11-01-2011, 05:50 PM
If you can, turn it on, run it, use it. Check for tracking issues, check to see if the sandpaper can be changed and secured properly.

The stand is requisite, and the tables are almost a necessity for me. See if you can adjust (if needed) the sander head to be square with the table/conveyor.

All that said, not unlike Chuck, I've had mine for about 9 years, not used daily, but used. I've stalled the motor from forcing too fast, too much, with too fine grit. Make that "tripped" the motor. I've not had issues other than the "normal" tracking, but the items I mention are things that I'd look at if I were buying used. Dust collection, proper dust collection, is mandatory. I still loosen the sinus when sanding Cocobolo, with the Dust Collector, and a mask - nasty stuff.

-Aaron

PelicanUkuleles
11-01-2011, 07:08 PM
I like the 16-32 Performax. I find it's a great machine. Especially, that I can roll it around the shop with ease. I bought mine used but in new condition (used one time by previous owner) with a stand and wheels (no table extensions). I couldn't be happier as it is the perfect size for my small shop.
I made a .pdf of the 16-32 Performax Owner's Manual if anybody needs it.

Flyfish57
11-02-2011, 04:54 AM
This is a pic of the one I was thinking about. Looks like a much older model with out the bracing of the more recent models.
29555

Edit. The bracing I was seeing look like they are for the models wider than the 16-32.

I bought this same model used a few years ago. The extention tables are very handy to have. When I was looking, there was everything from junk to mint. Take your time and the right one will come up. I paid 400.00 for mine and the prices I saw here in New England ranged from 350.00 to 600.00 for used.

~Steve

PelicanUkuleles
11-02-2011, 08:32 AM
I bought this same model used a few years ago. The extention tables are very handy to have. When I was looking, there was everything from junk to mint. Take your time and the right one will come up. I paid 400.00 for mine and the prices I saw here in New England ranged from 350.00 to 600.00 for used.

~Steve
Mine was mint and I paid 600.00 here in SoCal.

beardco
11-04-2011, 04:25 AM
You may want to consider the 22/44 Performax. I know it feels like overkill right now but, when I bought mine in the 90's, I believe the 16/32 came from a design for an adaptation to a table saw. I can't remember all the reasons why I rejected the 16/32 but, at the time it didn't seem like the best choice for the long term. Things may have changed but, I would compare the two before jumping on the 16/32 to save a few hundred dollars. With the 22/44 you get a belt driven Leeson motor and a very stable platform where the bed adjusts & not the sander head itself. It easily rolled around my small space. You do have the same tracking issues as the 16/32 but, when I had run mine in for a few hours and couldn't get it to track true, Performax Fedex'd me an entire table assembly at no charge.

I used mine for furniture and to dimension wood for marquetry. I would secure a piece to float glass using 3M spray adhesive after initial resaw on the bandsaw. This kept the entire piece from curling as it got thin. I remember bloodwood trying to curl a lot.

I don't know about the vacuum attachment on the 16/32 but, mine was effective enough that I could dimension cocobolo without a respirator.

The feed tables were useful. It didn't matter so much with small pieces but, with the longer ones it really cut down on the front & back end dip I got from not holding the piece exactly perpendicular.

At some point Performax updated the table adjustment knobs to make them more user friendly and I would definitely try to find the larger knob version. The 22/44 was a great machine that worked perfectly for the smallest 2 inch project up to sanding large doors. I would still have mine; it was my favorite power tool but, I was moving to Asia for an indefinite time and sold my entire shop.