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Pete Howlett
11-08-2011, 08:23 AM
British Alder - a well kept secret:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdzN62wrrsc

ukulian
11-08-2011, 11:38 AM
Nice looking and sounding instrument Pete.

British woods are really great and well under-rated. :)

PelicanUkuleles
11-08-2011, 12:48 PM
Lovely tone Pete! Chords didn't sound muddy in the video! Excellent job!
Very :cool:

aaronckeim
11-08-2011, 02:16 PM
cool pete- - are you interested in sharing your epoxy treated fingerboard technique? I imagine it is to harden and protect the walnut?

Pete Howlett
11-08-2011, 02:21 PM
Before fretting I get the fingerboard flat and sanded then fill it with Smiths Industries 'Finish Epoxy'. Normally takes 2 coats - just as you would if you were pore filling... Rick mentioned it. Makes for a nice playing surface. When i polish the frets with wire wool the board gets it to. very happy with the technique.

Pete Howlett
11-09-2011, 12:06 AM
Get it from a model shop - they use it for coating the wings on fibre-glass skinned balsa wings on model aircraft and such. I find it's less fussy than the west system.

Michael N.
11-09-2011, 01:07 AM
Vic. How do you know it's loud? If you turn the volume down on your PC, it will be quiet.
Just saying.

Pete Howlett
11-09-2011, 03:10 AM
Take it from me - it's loud...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-09-2011, 01:38 PM
Before fretting I get the fingerboard flat and sanded then fill it with Smiths Industries 'Finish Epoxy'.

I'm not seeing this. How are you keeping the epoxy out of the slots? If you are slotting after the board is filled and finished, then when are you installing the fret markers and tapering the board?

Pete Howlett
11-10-2011, 04:06 AM
I can't let all my secrets out now can I?

ksquine
11-10-2011, 07:34 AM
Sounds great!! I love alternative woods....especially when they're locally available

Pete Howlett
11-10-2011, 10:12 AM
This instrument also has a higher concept - it is meant to be played by someone wearing a tux or a black dress - hence the creamy white wood... if you have seen the Ukulele Orchestra Of great Britain you will appreciate the conceit :)

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-10-2011, 11:24 AM
I can't let all my secrets out now can I?

Never mind then. You shouldn't talk about it unless you're willing to share your process.

Pete Howlett
11-10-2011, 11:48 AM
I rarely use face dots and certainly don't do inlay - you know that Chuck!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-10-2011, 11:58 AM
I rarely use face dots and certainly don't do inlay - you know that Chuck!

Now how could I possibly know that Pete? I've never seen your work and with an Internet speed that is like dial up with a hang over, I've only seen a couple of your videos. Jungle living you know.

Pete Howlett
11-10-2011, 12:37 PM
:) :) Just for you Chuck to brighten up what must be a dull day... either that or you are yanking my chain! I am experimenting with this epoxy finish on the fingerboard system and am now trying the fill after slotting which should be fun. I have got a fix which I will share if it works - don't want to appear a chump any more than I already do...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
11-10-2011, 01:14 PM
When I get a request for a koa fret board, for instance, I will naturally choose the hardest wood i can find but I'll also harden treat it. I do so by saturating the top in thin ca glue. It's my guess that it penetrates better than any epoxy would. Then I slot it, shape it and mark it as usual. I just need to be careful not to remove too much when finishing the board.

jcalkin
11-10-2011, 03:06 PM
When I get a request for a koa fret board, for instance, I will naturally choose the hardest wood i can find but I'll also harden treat it. I do so by saturating the top in thin ca glue. It's my guess that it penetrates better than any epoxy would. Then I slot it, shape it and mark it as usual. I just need to be careful not to remove too much when finishing the board.

Chuck, that's a trick with lots of lutherial uses. I like to think of it as tempering the wood. Can be hard on the nose and eyes, though.

saltytri
11-10-2011, 03:40 PM
I do so by saturating the top in thin ca glue. It's my guess that it penetrates better than any epoxy would.

Does anyone know what a CA layer will look like in 5, 10, 20 years or more? Or whether it will be structurally sound?

jcalkin
11-11-2011, 02:08 AM
CA glue has been around since the '50s. The bugs are pretty well worked out. About 1980, model airplane makers turned me on to Hot Stuff CA, and I immediately started using it on instruments. I'm sure I'm not alone. If there were issues, I think they would have surfaced by now. The airplanes the guys made back then are still flying if they haven't crashed. One issue, though---certain combinations of CA and kickers can leave a green cast in the wood. Most unpleasant, especially with rosettes set into spruce. It may take weeks for the cast to develop. I almost never see them in a week or less, and they always seem to be too deep to sand out. Ruins your day.

Vic D
12-02-2011, 10:57 PM
Vic. How do you know it's loud? If you turn the volume down on your PC, it will be quiet.
Just saying.

I don't understand your question. Can you not hear the ambient noise surrounding Pete as he plays this ukuelele and by hearing the uke compared to the ambient noise can you not deduce that it's loud?

Michael N.
12-03-2011, 07:43 AM
No. Trying to ascertain the loudness of an instrument is pretty difficult at the best of times, let alone trying to judge by ambient noise. It's complicated by many things including the particular timbre and how it projects. Some instruments can sound loud close up whilst quiet from afar and vice versa. You have a much better chance with an AB comparison - preferably double blind.
i made the comment because I've seen similar judgements made on the loudness of various instruments on Utube. How can they possibly know what the recording level was? Factor in the technique of the individual player and room acoustics and you really haven't got a clue.
In this instance though we'll take Pete's word for it.

Vic D
12-03-2011, 11:09 AM
No. Trying to ascertain the loudness of an instrument is pretty difficult at the best of times, let alone trying to judge by ambient noise.

That's OK, Michael. I could tell, that's all that matters to me. :)