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Doug W
11-12-2011, 03:56 AM
Greetings,

I have used sawdust mixed with Elmer's glue in the past on some furniture refinishing projects. I am an amateur at furniture refinishing and more of an amateur at ukulele refinishing. The result in the past furniture projects was that the sawdust / glue area looked different than the surrounding wood and did not take stain or lacquer like the surrounding wood.

I am probably going to paint this particular uke a solid color after filling in the divots but I want to make sure it will take the paint in the repaired areas. Any advice would be appreciated.

BlackBearUkes
11-12-2011, 08:41 AM
Always use solid wood of the same type, color and grain direction for repairs and hide glue with it. Glue/wood dust combinations will never stain the same as the surrounding wood. If you are going to paint it, you can use practically anything.

ProfChris
11-12-2011, 11:37 AM
The closest colour match I've found for fixing divots (I've only made a dozen ukes, but fixed lots of divots in them!) is wood dust and CA glue. Light woods match less well than dark. Mahogany is visible but can be tolerable, dark rosewood can be near invisible.

Paint should work over pretty much any normal woodworking glue +dust. If you want the option of finshing with something clear, make up some test pieces and try them out with different glues to see how the colour goes.

mm stan
11-12-2011, 12:21 PM
Always use solid wood of the same type, color and grain direction for repairs and hide glue with it. Glue/wood dust combinations will never stain the same as the surrounding wood. If you are going to paint it, you can use practically anything.
Could you fill the gap with the wood putty (glue and wood dust) and sprinkle over it with wood dust to the wet putty so the stain will take to it?? or pre stain the putty??

BlackBearUkes
11-12-2011, 12:56 PM
It has been my experience that any kind of wood/glue mixture will stain darker than the wood around it. Even if you don't stain over it and just use a clear finish over it, it will look darker. If that is what you want, go for it. Sometimes in the past, I have use a different colored wood with CA glue to match a chip or hole. For instance, try glue and pine or spruce to match hole chip in Koa. You have to experiment a bit with this, but you would be surprised how different kinds of wood will look wet. If the hole isn't too big, you can sand the wood over the hole until the hole is filled with dry dust. Drop in a small amount of CA into the filled spot and then sand over the whole thing while the CA is still curing. You can kiss the sand paper good bye but often the hole is filled nicely. Like I said, the hole can't be too big, say smaller then 3/32" in diameter.

Doug W
11-12-2011, 02:09 PM
Thanks for the replies. This is an old uke that ended up in my hands and I just want to make it playable and maybe learn something in the process. There are enough dents in this one to try a few different methods. Maybe I will use lacquer instead of painting to see how the different methods come out. I guess I should have some hide glue around anyway.

Thanks again,
Doug

mm stan
11-12-2011, 02:59 PM
[QUOTE=BlackBearUkes;801718]It has been my experience that any kind of wood/glue mixture will stain darker than the wood around it. Even if you don't stain over it and just use a clear finish over it, it will look darker. If that is what you want, go for it. Sometimes in the past, I have use a different colored wood with CA glue to match a chip or hole. For instance, try glue and pine or spruce to match hole chip in Koa. You have to experiment a bit with this, but you would be surprised how different kinds of wood will look wet. If the hole isn't too big, you can sand the wood over the hole until the hole is filled with dry dust. Drop in a small amount of CA into the filled spot and then sand over the whole thing while the CA is still curing. You can kiss the sand paper good bye but often the hole is filled nicely. Like I said, the hole can't be too big, say smaller then 3/32" in diameter.[/QUOTE
Aloha Duane,
Mahalo for sharing your insight and knowledge, I am truely thankful...I never thought of using different woods to fill a Koa gap....makes good darn sense..

stevepetergal
12-26-2011, 09:42 AM
Heck, if you were painting it, you could use bondo!

Colonel Uke
12-28-2011, 05:19 AM
Are they dents or actual holes and cracks you're trying to fill? If they're just dents, something that has worked for me when I used to restore old gunstocks was to steam the dent up. Dampen the area then cover with a damp washcloth them use your steam iron in short bursts, checking the wood each time, to raise the dent. I'll take several tries, but the dent will raise up.

stevepetergal
12-30-2011, 11:51 AM
Do gun stocks have glue joints? I wouldn't use steam on the ukulele.

Unfortunately, I'm not the best uke player on my block.

Colonel Uke
12-30-2011, 12:47 PM
Do gun stocks have glue joints? I wouldn't use steam on the ukulele.

Unfortunately, I'm not the best uke player on my block.

No, you're right, steam probably wouldn't be good for a glue joint. Haven't tried it on a uke, but for solid wood like a gun stock, it's an accepted practice that works extremely well.