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garyg
11-24-2011, 08:21 AM
I just wanted to wish everyone Happy Thanksgiving and express my appreciation for all the knowledge that I've gained from list members. I've learned a tremendous amount from everyone here and look forward to learning more over the years. Mahalo, g2

PhilUSAFRet
11-24-2011, 03:34 PM
Well thank you and a very happy Thanksgiving to you too

SuzukHammer
11-25-2011, 01:22 AM
I think I need a Asian translation. This looks like some of the stuff i've read.

I'm not saying that in any bad way. I really enjoy reading translations.

garyg
11-25-2011, 04:24 AM
@Suzuki, well PM me with what you don't understand and I'll be glad to phrase it another way. Although I know that we have many foreign members, I thought that the non-religious holiday of Thanksgiving, established in the US, was fairly well known but for those of you who would like an explanation -- from history.com
"In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn't until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November." cheers, g2

JamieFromOntario
11-25-2011, 04:54 AM
@garyg - I don't know if I would say that Thanksgiving was established in the US - maybe Black Friday was - but not Thanksgiving itself. Really, we could say that the holiday now known as Thanksgiving was established by numerous French and English colonists in the New World before the founding of any of the independent North American countries.

Sorry to quibble - just the Canadian in me asserting itself against an often America-centric blog-o-sphere.

Don't annex North American history the way you have so many of our actors and musicians! (you can keep Justin Bieber and NickelBack though) ;)

Happy Thanksgiving folks!

garyg
11-25-2011, 05:38 AM
@garyg - I don't know if I would say that Thanksgiving was established in the US - maybe Black Friday was - but not Thanksgiving itself. Really, we could say that the holiday now known as Thanksgiving was established by numerous French and English colonists in the New World before the founding of any of the independent North American countries.

Sorry to quibble - just the Canadian in me asserting itself against an often America-centric blog-o-sphere.

Don't annex North American history the way you have so many of our actors and musicians! (you can keep Justin Bieber and NickelBack though) ;)

Happy Thanksgiving folks!

Wow, a disagreement about the origin of Thanksgiving, that's pretty close to a karmic oxymoron, so I'll try and restrain myself <g>. And yes feel free to blame me for the Americanization of the blogo-sphere and the annexation of North American history by Americans - I admit to it all. Parenthetically, I will note that your comment made me curious about the first Thanksgiving feasts so I came up with the following
The 1621 feast held in Plymouth is widely recognized as the first Thanksgiving, but it was not the first time a group paused to give thanks in America. Here are some early celebrations in American/colonial history but of course one event does not a holiday make:

May 1541: Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado and 1,500 men hold a thanksgiving celebration in what is now known as the Texas panhandle.

June 30, 1564: French Huguenot colonists celebrate a day of thanksgiving in a settlement near what is now Jacksonville, Fla.

Aug. 9, 1607: English settlers led by Captain George Popham join Abenaki Indians for a harvest feast along the Kennebec River in Maine.

Didn't see any in territory that became anything other than the US but my search was hardly exhaustive. Perhaps you can provide those Canadian examples that predate the ones that I've mentioned? It is interesting that Canadian Thanksgiving was founded in 1957 almost one hundred years after Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday in the US. But of course that's not cultural appropriation is it. Regardless, harvest holidays go way back in antiquity such as the Jewish holiday of Sukkot still practiced today. And we're all "johnny come latelys" in comparison, given that it's been celebrated continuously for thousands of years. Perhaps there are Asian or African or other harvest holidays that have been continuously practiced for longer. But in the end let's just be thankful for all the good things in our life and let's try and do that daily rather than save it for an annual holiday. cheers mate, g2

JamieFromOntario
11-25-2011, 06:25 AM
Truly I didn't mean to blame you for anything (I think you were just being facetious when you took on all the blame yourself) - and my comment on the Americanization of North American history was made somewhat in jest.

But...you've sparked in me the quibbler's spirit!

So here are my next ones:
You ask me to provide Canadian examples which predate the ones you gave. I don't have any (though there may be some out there - though Martin Frobisher comes close in 1578). All that aside, I guess I might argue that the examples you gave are not American at all; you are implying that just because an event occurred in an area that later became the U.S.A. that makes it an American event. That's kind of like saying that the ukulele is an American instrument because it originated in Hawaii. Or, that Passover is an Egyptian holiday since thats where the events took place. Or, that Valentines days is an Italian holiday for the same reason.
One might argue too that Canada has a much stronger connection with England (the Queen being our titular head of state) and, thus, your example of English settlers in Maine might be better connected with the Canadian Thanksgiving tradition. I suppose, I could make a similar point about the French colonists too.
I guess I better stop now, though, lest I reignite the war of 1812!!!


Thanks for a chance to quibble and for giving me an opportunity to learn more about the subject.

I hope y'all enjoy your turkey (I think we have that it common, at least).
Peace.

garyg
11-25-2011, 07:22 AM
"Thanks for a chance to quibble and for giving me an opportunity to learn more about the subject." Damn, do they say y'all in Canada, talk about cultural appropriation? Harrumph.

And you my Canuck friend can not claim both Britain and France - there were wars fought over that. Also given that both places were colonies of both countries and we can claim Spanish heritage too, I will still claim Thanksgiving is an American holiday because regardless of the ancient history, we've celebrated it continuously for 100+ years. As for the uke, yeah I'll claim that for pushy America too with the proviso that it was developed by Portuguese immigrants and based on a Portuguese instrument. Valentines day, sure let's give that to Italy but it's not a national holiday. Egyptians and Passover, oh my friend you are so far off the mark there. I'll give Passover an Egyptian origin when they retroactively all convert to Judaism <g>, and remember in those days nationality frequently was based on religion rather than geography.

ciao, g2

engravertom
11-25-2011, 07:58 AM
Happy thanksgiving! I got a new Uke! (we have started giving gifts on Thanksgiving in our house, since we always travel for Christmas.)

It is a Kala SLNG. back to the Longneck for me!

Happy leftovers to all!

Tom

Gwynedd
11-27-2013, 11:39 PM
Happy Thanksgiving, all you wonderful uke people. This IS our holiday--because uke players tend to give thanks and be generous (viz; Kiva and all the help here.) I HAVE A BIG FAVOR TO ASK: someone asked me "How do Hawaiians celebrate their feast? Do they have turkey or do they do something different?" All answers appreciated and....have a great day. This is my fave holiday.

ichadwick
11-28-2013, 01:00 AM
I think I need a Asian translation. This looks like some of the stuff i've read.
Canadian Thanksgiving perhaps? We hold ours about six weeks before the US... but then we're always a jump ahead of our American cousins .... ;-)

ichadwick
11-28-2013, 01:02 AM
(you can keep Justin Bieber and NickelBack though) ;)

Dang, were's that "Like" button....?

Kanaka916
11-28-2013, 04:43 AM
Happy Thanksgiving, all you wonderful uke people. This IS our holiday--because uke players tend to give thanks and be generous (viz; Kiva and all the help here.) I HAVE A BIG FAVOR TO ASK: someone asked me "How do Hawaiians celebrate their feast? Do they have turkey or do they do something different?" All answers appreciated and....have a great day. This is my fave holiday.
Believe it or not, families in Hawaii do celebrate with the traditional dishes and mixed in as well are a few island delicacies.

bonesigh
11-28-2013, 05:43 AM
Happy Thanksgiving everyone (:

hmgberg
11-28-2013, 05:59 AM
Hi Gary:

I have a wishbone to pick with y'all.

Would like to say that I appreciate your post, regardless of the origins of the holiday. Can't understand how such a sentiment engenders a research project. Nevertheless, I will be sharing dinner with friends near the banks of the Penobscot.

Happy Thanksgiving!