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peatstackron
11-28-2011, 06:14 AM
Hi all,
Iv'e been looking at some chord charts and found something that I don't understand(whats new) some of the chords i.e. Amaj7 have two black dots to indicate frets and three open rings to indicate open strings. I understand this.What I don't understand is below this there is a row of open rings on the same chord. If you understand my question could someone please explain what the second lot of open rings stand for?

Peatstack

O by the way confession time just bought my third Uke another Oscar Schmidt but this is a concert ou5 off e bay. I need a therapy group quick Iv'e only been learning a month.

Ambient Doughnut
11-28-2011, 06:19 AM
I've read this a few times and I'm afraid I don't really understand the question. Have you a link to the charts that are causing you trouble? Or a pic if they're not online?

Kanaka916
11-28-2011, 06:46 AM
Just a WAG . . . but it could be showing the 2nd, 3rd, 4th positions of the chord as you progress up the FB. What chord chart are you using?

Nickie
11-28-2011, 07:09 AM
Well, it sounds like you already have contracted UAS. Some of fall prey to it much easier than others. But don't worry, you're helping the economy. Just don't forget to put some aside for rent and groceries!

peatstackron
11-28-2011, 07:19 AM
I have a link if it works, http://www.ukalady.com/Images/UkeChart.pdf

SailingUke
11-28-2011, 07:22 AM
A lot of chord charts indicate an alternative fingering with notation as you described.

Gmoney
11-28-2011, 07:31 AM
I have a link if it works, http://www.ukalady.com/Images/UkeChart.pdf

SailingUke has the answer even w/o seeing your chord chart. Good example would be the fingerings for Cmaj7 up to Emaj7. Note that the Emaj7 has a "first position" or "non-barred" variation, but also the natural progression using the same basic chord position/shape up the neck.

Kanaka916
11-28-2011, 07:40 AM
Yup, that's what it is . . . 2nd position. The Amaj7 you referred to, I would barre the lower 3 on the 4th fret with the ring finger and and the index finger on the 2nd fret of the G string.

peatstackron
11-28-2011, 08:18 AM
Hmmmmm. No sorry this has confused me, if it is an alternative fingering of a chord should it not produce the same note as the first chord or is to replace the first chord with a different note? They don't sound the same.

Gmoney
11-28-2011, 08:28 AM
Hmmmmm. No sorry this has confused me, if it is an alternative fingering of a chord should it not produce the same note as the first chord or is to replace the first chord with a different note? They don't sound the same.

They should sound similar, but not necessarily identical. Since the uke only has 4 strings & 2.5 octaves, a chord might sound slightly different from its equivalent in a different position up the neck. The different chord positions provide alternates which may add "flavor" to a particular melody and/or good transition forms when moving from one chord to another. Also. depending on how well you finger barre chords, you may have trouble corrrectly fingering those chords. Additionally, as you move down the neck, you may encounter intonation issues indicating that your uke may need "setup" or a different set of strings.

Hope this helps. Mahalo!

peatstackron
11-28-2011, 09:06 AM
Yes I think I understand thank you all.

Doghouse_Riley
11-29-2011, 01:37 PM
Another reason for alternate fingerings: sometimes going from one chord to the next an alternate fingering is easier to go to.

Little Plink
11-29-2011, 02:21 PM
What's important to understand is that they're both A7. A (1st) C# (3rd) E (5th) and G (7th.) The notes are just strummed in a different order, and some in different octaves. Musically, it's the same, but to our ear it sounds different. It will create the same mood or effect when played against a melody either way.