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Tudorp
11-30-2011, 12:11 PM
I have a few ukes that tend to be my "go too" ukes. I have all the sizes available with the exception of the bari. I generally grab one of my concerts, or my tenor. But lately, I been having a blast with my 1st love, my Soprano Ohana SK-35 (Iz). I hadn't played Iz in some time. In fact, I almost sold or traded him off several times over the past couple years. I have also been playing my Sopranino Ohana SK-21 (Ku'u Poki'i), and been having a blast with her too. I almost sold her a few times. All I have to say is, I am so glad I didn't. I had forgotten how much fun I have had with both those ukes. I fell in love with both of their voices all over again. My appologies to Iz, and his baby sister Ku'u poki'i for my neglect over the past year or two. I promise, I will play you two more... ;)

vanflynn
11-30-2011, 12:33 PM
Those that love you will always understand.

Skottoman
11-30-2011, 04:25 PM
I go through phases as well. I have 9 ukes now (selling the Kala at a local shop)...

I started in a soprano phase, then went to concert phase, then to tenor, then back to concert, then soprano with sopranino, now tenor and low G tenor...

Today I picked up my sopranino and played it. Missed and know that voice very well.

I know what you mean...
Cheers,
Skottoman

itsme
11-30-2011, 04:33 PM
I have 7 ukes and try to spread the love around so they don't get jealous. :p

This way my husband can't ever say "You never play that one, you should get rid of it."

But honestly, if I found I didn't play them on a regular basis, I'd have to consider thinning the herd.

All of my ukes are different, like individual children. Every time I play one I am reminded of the special qualities of that particular instrument. :)

mm stan
11-30-2011, 06:13 PM
Aloha Tudorp,
I always revisit my favorites ....gives me renewed appriciation for them ...plus it's tons of fun.. and I can show them I still love them...Happy strummings..

Big_e
11-30-2011, 06:18 PM
I'm seriously up'ing the action on my ukulele practice and keep 3 of my ukes around at all times. When I play a tune a few times and get it right, I'll switch to a different uke and play it again. This keeps me from getting bored and helps keep me going longer in my practice sessions.
I seriously want to learn some Christmas songs for the upcoming office parties and family get-togethers.
Ernest

garyg
12-01-2011, 03:14 AM
I have too many ukes, soprano is my favorite but as someone who has only been playing seriously for six months I find that playing different ukes is hard on my "finger memory" and it takes a few songs to get use to the new uke with slightly different sized frets and differences in neck thickness and width. That seems to differ the most on sopranos, the thickness of the neck but there are significant variations in neck width too. Fret size seems to vary less but enough to mess me up when I'm playing chords and not looking at my fingering. I've thought about just sticking to the few ukes that have similar necks and frets, like my Kamaka and my Martin 1M but can't seem to let go (haha) of others that differ like my Favilla U-2 or Black Bear Koa. Still I think that it's slowing my ability to learn how to play well. ciao, g2

Drew Bear
12-01-2011, 09:28 AM
...as someone who has only been playing seriously for six months I find that playing different ukes is hard on my "finger memory" and it takes a few songs to get use to the new uke with slightly different sized frets and differences in neck thickness and width...I think that it's slowing my ability to learn how to play well.

I was wondering about this very thing. Add in variations in nut & bridge heights and string tension. These things are not as critical for a more proficient player because they know how to make adjustments on the fly. Not the case for beginners...at least not this one.

Tudorp
12-01-2011, 09:36 AM
One of many reasons for the importance of proper "set up". If ya have one, or a hundred ukes, be sure they all are set up properly, and if ya can, by the same technician. I set all mine up myself, and all mine are set up with the same specs. Sure, there is difference in size, and neck profiles and things like that, but as far as string spacing, height, etc, all mine are the same, so it is much easier to put one down, and pick up another without much adjustment.

PoiDog
12-01-2011, 11:00 AM
Gee. I guess there is an upside to having "only" two ukes. Who knew?

OldePhart
12-01-2011, 12:01 PM
Only gots one thing to say - if you decide to slap yourself make sure and post a video of it on youtube so we can all enjoy it... LOL

John

Tudorp
12-01-2011, 12:12 PM
I am a spontanious type John, so odds of a video camera being trained on me at that specific time is slim. But, I promise ya, I will try to capture it just for you to enjoy my old phart friend.. lol



Only gots one thing to say - if you decide to slap yourself make sure and post a video of it on youtube so we can all enjoy it... LOL

John

Tudorp
12-01-2011, 12:14 PM
Just never felt the yurning for a bari. Not saying it will never happen, I said the same thing about a tenor a year ago, and now have a couple. I don't play the tenors much, always seem to go to my concerts these days, but, again, maybe some day I will "feel" the bari... My steel string solid body electric has a 19" scale like a bari tho, does that count?


When you get a baritone, the tudorp group will all feel a lot safer.

garyg
12-01-2011, 03:11 PM
@Tudorp -- yes setup is important but as you and I have both noted, different ukes are constructed differently (especially vintage ukes) and that's the problem. They have different nut heights, different bridge heights, different neck widths with different string spacing on the nut (compare a vintage Kamaka soprano with a vintage Martin soprano) and unless you're willing to file the nuts and change the bridge heights, you're not going to have the same action on ukes with different construction, nor will you have exactly the same fret spacing (I should probably make some measurements before making the statement <g>, but I'm sure that my KoAloha Pikake has wider frets up towards the nut than my aNueNue). Anyway it was more of a query/observation than anything else. Onwards and upwards, g

Tudorp
12-01-2011, 03:19 PM
For sure there are differences, but I always set up all my players the same way. Fret spacing is determined by the scale, and of course different scale lengths will have different fret spacing. Nothing one can do about that. Soprano concert, tenor, and so on, all have different scale lengths, so of course ya have to adjust to that. The most difficult thing I deal with is different tuning, and remembering what tuning I am playing with t be sure I am playing the correct notes, lol.. Never in my 30+ year of playing have I ever been able to read music, so all mine is memory, and mucsel memory, and if someone throws me a different non standard tuning, it sure will toss a monkey wrench into my deal.. ;)



@Tudorp -- yes setup is important but as you and I have both noted, different ukes are constructed differently (especially vintage ukes) and that's the problem. They have different nut heights, different bridge heights, different neck widths with different string spacing on the nut (compare a vintage Kamaka soprano with a vintage Martin soprano) and unless you're willing to file the nuts and change the bridge heights, you're not going to have the same action on ukes with different construction, nor will you have exactly the same fret spacing (I should probably make some measurements before making the statement <g>, but I'm sure that my KoAloha Pikake has wider frets up towards the nut than my aNueNue). Anyway it was more of a query/observation than anything else. Onwards and upwards, g