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View Full Version : What does "Low G" mean, exactly?



mendel
12-02-2011, 03:17 AM
I understand that a Low G string means that the G is strung an octave below normal, correct? My question is whether or not this changes the manner in which chords are fretted and notes are played while fingerpicking? Does it just change the sound, or does it change everything?

haolejohn
12-02-2011, 03:21 AM
I understand that a Low G string means that the G is strung an octave below normal, correct? My question is whether or not this changes the manner in which chords are fretted and notes are played while fingerpicking? Does it just change the sound, or does it change everything?

I'm no expert but I think it just changes sound. I still play all my chords the same way and they sound the same but just a little lower. When I pick, I still pick the same strings and the only difference is the g sounds lower. Hope that helps. I also noticed that a wound low g is more lower sounding than an unwound low g.

kissing
12-02-2011, 03:28 AM
The chords don't change.
You just have a lower tuned G, which sounds a bit different. It also changes fingerpicking, as you have a low-sounding G below the C, rather than a high-G.


Low G (sound sample by MGM)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIGatnRI_m4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIGatnRI_m4


Very simple.

Olarte
12-02-2011, 03:33 AM
Two things for me.

A low g sound gives you a steady deep base line like in IZ's rendition of somewhere over the rainbow.

And it's also good if you come from a guitar background where one is used to the strings being sequential.

But a reentrant g is great for the sweet uke sound.

So I keep all my ukes reentrant except for one tenor which is a low g, and i suppose closest to a guitar sound.

But other than that as far as chords, they will both sound fine with the same fingering but one will sound more like a uke the other one more guitar-ish...

Hope this, helps.

mendel
12-02-2011, 04:16 AM
Can any size Uke have a Low G, or only Tenor size?

haolejohn
12-02-2011, 04:18 AM
Can any size Uke have a Low G, or only Tenor size?

I had a student that loved my low g tenor so he strung his dolphin low g. I wasn't too keen on the sound but he was happy. I have seen people with low g concerts. Me personally stick with the tenor scale. I think the shorter scales sound a bit muddy with a low g.

Olarte
12-02-2011, 04:37 AM
Uhm intersting... I'm glad I picked a 2nd Tenor, as my low G uke, since it's closer to a guitar anyway.

Although I think IZ, played a soprano or at least a concert with the low G no?


I had a student that loved my low g tenor so he strung his dolphin low g. I wasn't too keen on the sound but he was happy. I have seen people with low g concerts. Me personally stick with the tenor scale. I think the shorter scales sound a bit muddy with a low g.

the52blues
12-02-2011, 05:08 AM
One of the main reasons for using a low G is for getting a larger range while picking out the melody. If you just strum chords all chords are fretted the same way but you can hear the deeper sound of the low G or the sweeter sound of the reentrant G. But if you play melody and chords together or like to use moving "bass" notes in your chords (because of my guitar background) then log G gives you some extra lower notes to use below middle C. Specifically low G, A and B.

mm stan
12-02-2011, 05:09 AM
The chords position stay the same...just when you strum down...you always start in a low note...

allanr
12-02-2011, 05:29 AM
My "low G rule", which of course I keep breaking, is:

Soprano (or sopranino) = re-entrant (high) g
Concert = dealer's choice
Tenor = Low G
I keep my electric soprano uke strung with low g

Preference depends a lot on style and sound. The songs of the 20s and 30s sound best to me when strummed on a high g soprano. Modern pop songs, written for guitar, sound better to me when strummed on a low g tenor or concert.

BTW, I'm pretty sure that IZ played a tenor... it only looks like a soprano because he was so big. I've also read online (but can't confirm) that he used a standard set of high g strings, but liked to use them sequentially from thick to thin, so that he used the C string as his low G.

Drew Bear
12-02-2011, 05:29 AM
This HMS video helped me understand some of the differences between low & high G:

Tenor Ukulele Strings, High G or Low G? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtpEU9F0Nic)

kaizersoza
12-02-2011, 05:18 PM
The chords don't change.
You just have a lower tuned G, which sounds a bit different. It also changes fingerpicking, as you have a low-sounding G below the C, rather than a high-G.


Low G (sound sample by MGM)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIGatnRI_m4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIGatnRI_m4


Very simple.

hi guys sorry to flame this thread but i have been looking for the chord progression MGM plays for absolutely ages can anyone help me please!!!! Its about 18 seconds into this demo vid, hope someone can help thanx in advance
kaizer

Raygf
12-02-2011, 05:42 PM
hi guys sorry to flame this thread but i have been looking for the chord progression MGM plays for absolutely ages can anyone help me please!!!! Its about 18 seconds into this demo vid, hope someone can help thanx in advance
kaizer

It's from Bob Marley's Waiting in Vain (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?2133-GUTING-you-waiting-in-vain-song). 0222 (GMaj7) 0002 (CMaj7)

haolejohn
12-02-2011, 07:09 PM
Uhm intersting... I'm glad I picked a 2nd Tenor, as my low G uke, since it's closer to a guitar anyway.

Although I think IZ, played a soprano or at least a concert with the low G no?

Nope. He was just that big.

kaizersoza
12-02-2011, 11:50 PM
thanx for that Raygf i thought i recognised the tune but could'nt put my finger on it muchos grazias

kaizersoza
12-02-2011, 11:53 PM
i am going to put a low G string on my mainland red cedar tenor, does anyone know if a wound G string will fit into the nut ok????