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View Full Version : Black is the Colour (Irish Folk/Christy Moore)



-SRS-45-
12-19-2011, 12:58 PM
Hi, heres a song a recorded today, Black is the Colour, a beautiful old Irish Folk song. I hope you enjoy it.

James


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z8J96uWbgOQ&feature=youtu.be

23skidoo
12-19-2011, 02:42 PM
Wonderfully done! A very nice arrangement and well performed..... the recording sounds great as well. Thanks for posting this - it's really enjoyable, a pleasure to hear.....

elisdad
12-19-2011, 03:26 PM
Very nice! Nice playing.

-SRS-45-
12-19-2011, 11:47 PM
Thanks for the kind words guys, yeah Christy Moore is great I've learnt a lot about Irish Folk through him.

Merry crimbo :)

freackykit
12-20-2011, 02:53 AM
Brilliant video editing vocals and uke playing...

Thanks for sharing, a pleasure to watch,

Chris

Tootler
12-20-2011, 05:51 AM
A good version, but it's not originally a Traditional Irish song.

The earliest version collected from the Oral tradition was by Cecil Sharp in North Carolina in 1915. A reference to the Clyde suggests a possible Scottish origin, but it's all speculation. It was lost in the British Isles and all versions that have been collected were in North America. What subsequently happened is that the song was carried back to the British Isles and was picked up by Irish singers.

All that aside, it's a lovely, haunting song. I have a version on my You Tube Channel. The words are more or less as collected by Cecil Sharp though I left out one verse as it was a collation of two of the earlier verses. I'm afraid my uke playing isn't up to your standard, though.


http://youtu.be/ykXXnLaHOfY

-SRS-45-
12-21-2011, 05:18 AM
Thanks Chris.


A good version, but it's not originally a Traditional Irish song.

The earliest version collected from the Oral tradition was by Cecil Sharp in North Carolina in 1915. A reference to the Clyde suggests a possible Scottish origin, but it's all speculation. It was lost in the British Isles and all versions that have been collected were in North America. What subsequently happened is that the song was carried back to the British Isles and was picked up by Irish singers.

All that aside, it's a lovely, haunting song. I have a version on my You Tube Channel. The words are more or less as collected by Cecil Sharp though I left out one verse as it was a collation of two of the earlier verses. I'm afraid my uke playing isn't up to your standard, though.



I was not aware of that thanks for the info, I love you singing, I has a very folkish sound, I feel I could be sitting in a pub surrounded by muscians singing and playing.

Tootler
12-21-2011, 06:31 AM
I was not aware of that thanks for the info, I love you singing, I has a very folkish sound, I feel I could be sitting in a pub surrounded by muscians singing and playing.

And thanks for your comment. I like the bit about sitting in a pub as it's where I mostly sing folk songs :)

Hippie Dribble
12-21-2011, 06:07 PM
Love this song deeply, as me and my wife have sung this together for many years. This was a very sweet, romantic and heartfelt performance James. Beautiful in all respects mate, cheers.

-SRS-45-
12-22-2011, 03:24 AM
Love this song deeply, as me and my wife have sung this together for many years. This was a very sweet, romantic and heartfelt performance James. Beautiful in all respects mate, cheers.

Thats really nice, I've been trying to get my wife back into violin for years but no luck yet. Much thanks buddy

mm stan
12-22-2011, 03:42 AM
Aloha James,
That was sweet...love them folk Irish songs...great job....wish to learn more...at now I only know one....
May you and your family have a Merry christmas.....thank you for sharing..

sweetdemise
12-22-2011, 03:58 AM
That was fantastic. I actually played this song in symphonic band. Although as a percussionist, play really means listen. But this sounded great.

Leodhas
12-22-2011, 06:17 AM
A good version, but it's not originally a Traditional Irish song.

The earliest version collected from the Oral tradition was by Cecil Sharp in North Carolina in 1915. A reference to the Clyde suggests a possible Scottish origin, but it's all speculation. It was lost in the British Isles and all versions that have been collected were in North America. What subsequently happened is that the song was carried back to the British Isles and was picked up by Irish singers.

All that aside, it's a lovely, haunting song. I have a version on my You Tube Channel. The words are more or less as collected by Cecil Sharp though I left out one verse as it was a collation of two of the earlier verses. I'm afraid my uke playing isn't up to your standard, though.


http://youtu.be/ykXXnLaHOfY


The song was simply first recorded in the States, it is an old Scottish folk song and was song to me by my grandfather who'd been singing it since god knows. Christy Moore picked it up from the Glasgow folk circuit and gives credit to Hamish Imlach for his version of the song (which is the best recorded version I've heard). Scottish songs are often confused as Irish which is understandable due to the close geography and cultural links and to be fair it goes both ways.

I'd like to add I've heard several variants of the song, sung by auld timers in the pubs and clubs which were are all good

-SRS-45-
12-23-2011, 02:59 AM
Cheers stan and sdemiseYeah its fasinating how folk music used to travel. Its what makes it quite special

Tootler
12-24-2011, 12:55 PM
The song was simply first recorded in the States, it is an old Scottish folk song and was song to me by my grandfather who'd been singing it since god knows. Christy Moore picked it up from the Glasgow folk circuit and gives credit to Hamish Imlach for his version of the song (which is the best recorded version I've heard). Scottish songs are often confused as Irish which is understandable due to the close geography and cultural links and to be fair it goes both ways.

Hamish Imlach's version of the song was, in fact, a reworking of a version from John Jacob Niles, an American folk song collector.

One thing I have learnt about folk song is to be sceptical about absolute positive claims for the origins of songs. The known fact is that Black is the Colour of My True Love's Hair is an American Folk song, very likely of British Origin. As there have been no versions collected in the British Isles, that is all that can be said for certain.

The reference to The Clyde together with the fact that many settlers in the Appalachians were from Scotland suggests it was taken to America from Scotland, but the reference to the Clyde does not guarantee an ultimately Scottish Origin as place names in songs were regularly changed as songs were carried from place to place.

I'm afraid the "It's definitely traditional Scottish because my grandfather has been singing it since..." type of claim also has to be treated with scepticism as such claims have been shown to be notoriously unreliable. For example, similar claims have been made for "Shoals of Herring", "Fiddler's Green" and "Last Thing on my Mind" all of which are modern songs with known composers.

The wanderings of songs, the uncertainties of their origins - and the unexpected origins in many cases are part of the fascination of folk song, in addition to the variety of the songs and the stories they tell; these are all part of the fascination of folk song.

Leodhas
12-25-2011, 12:37 AM
Hamish Imlach's version of the song was, in fact, a reworking of a version from John Jacob Niles, an American folk song collector.

One thing I have learnt about folk song is to be sceptical about absolute positive claims for the origins of songs. The known fact is that Black is the Colour of My True Love's Hair is an American Folk song, very likely of British Origin. As there have been no versions collected in the British Isles, that is all that can be said for certain.

The reference to The Clyde together with the fact that many settlers in the Appalachians were from Scotland suggests it was taken to America from Scotland, but the reference to the Clyde does not guarantee an ultimately Scottish Origin as place names in songs were regularly changed as songs were carried from place to place.

I'm afraid the "It's definitely traditional Scottish because my grandfather has been singing it since..." type of claim also has to be treated with scepticism as such claims have been shown to be notoriously unreliable. For example, similar claims have been made for "Shoals of Herring", "Fiddler's Green" and "Last Thing on my Mind" all of which are modern songs with known composers.

The wanderings of songs, the uncertainties of their origins - and the unexpected origins in many cases are part of the fascination of folk song, in addition to the variety of the songs and the stories they tell; these are all part of the fascination of folk song.

Less of the british origin, Imperialistic blanket terms such as british isles when used as a geographical term for the collection of islands off the west coast of europe inclusive of Ireland grinds, but sometimes it's easier to let it slide with the english. However, when the word british is used as a collective reference inclusive of my country, I find that very offensive! At no point have I insulted you or called you a c**t which is the magnitude of offence I take being labelled under that banner. If you were ignorant to the possible offence a Scotsman could take that's fair enough. However, if you simply take note of the political situation in my country it is easy to understand how that offence could be caused. With Scots It is hit and miss with that word as it is with the Irish, So it's best not to use it in the first place.

It's not like i'm a screaming anti-english nationalist, indeed I lived in england (Salford) from the age of 11-17 as my father moved the family down for work and my brother still lives in Manchester, so I still have family there, but I am aware of my Countries present and past plight and this is why I do not except certain labels. You only have to look how the Scottish parliament was set up under guidance from London in order to prevent the SNP obtaining a full majority (which they still managed to do) In order to see a prime example of the underhand Imperialistic cards we find ourselves in this country, socially and culturally being dealt (propaganda is well and truly alive in Scotland whether people wish to acknowledge it or not).

I'm not trying to cause offence, only attempting to explain why I have taken it.

In relation to the song, all I can go off is what I know. Lyrically referring to Scotland (which can't be ignored) and as you pointed out the sway of Scots who emigrated to the Appalachians. Also the fact I have heard many variants of the song sung in the pubs and clubs, some using Scots words and with differing structure. Now it doesn't take colombo to figure out why we claim it. The way you attempt to strip Scotland of any claim on the song by using the encompassing phrase of the british isles is indicative of the cultural stripping my country has endured for over 260 years now. The Irish experienced the exact same and it is only with the emergence of an independent state they have been able to re-imprint their cultural thumb on the world in a meaningful way. Once again, this is indicative of the british mind set.

Now it's Christmas day and I wish you and yours all the best.

PS, If you're actually a Scotsman (regardless of leaning) shame on you sir for using that Imperialistic term, you should and would of known it can cause hugh offence. Anyway, all the best. (also, please don't come back telling me about my own culture and country, especially if you're not Scottish. The english telling Scots about their own country is the most patronising pish in the world. I should add, especially when it's middleclass, british university mindset educated english people, that pish truly is the most patronising).

Tootler
12-25-2011, 11:06 AM
I'm sorry you had to take my comments that way.


I'm not trying to cause offence...

Well you have.

I have nothing more to say as it is clear to me that this discussion can no longer proceed in a productive manner and I have no wish to hijack the thread any more than I already have done.