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thehappyukulele
12-26-2011, 02:44 AM
A concept ukulele. Semi-hollow, thin-body, fat-bottom, flat-top, electric tenor in padauk and curly maple. Body is just 2 inches at its thickest point. Sides and back were carved from a single piece of wood so the waist is very tight. Entire body is rounded on the back so it is extraordinarily comfortable to hold against you. K&K Sound passive pickup.

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allanr
12-26-2011, 03:21 AM
Too cool!!!

ksiegel
12-26-2011, 03:25 AM
It is beautiful... but what does it sound like, played acoustic?




-Kurt

Kanaka916
12-26-2011, 03:36 AM
Howzit Dave? Good to see you posting. I like the design . . . how does it sound acoustically or is it specifically made to be amplified?

thehappyukulele
12-26-2011, 07:10 AM
Thanks Kurt. I'm trying to get a recording of it. Unfortunately I'm a rank beginner player but I'm trying to get a decent recording of it soon. It's surprisingly loud and has very good sustain even though it is less than 2 inches deep.

thehappyukulele
12-26-2011, 07:13 AM
Hey good! How you? I just got back from Maui last week. Enjoyed the warm winter winds. As I mentioned to Kurt above, I'm trying to get a good recording. This one has great tone and surprising volume for such a thin body. I'll post a sound clip when I can.

Dave

tonewood
12-26-2011, 09:39 AM
That is really cool. Love the contours of the back. I new of an archtop builder that use to make his body sides the same way. Carved out of a chunk of mohagany. Nice job.

thehappyukulele
12-26-2011, 12:48 PM
I've built a couple of archtops with a one-piece back and sides myself. I love the technique because you can do so much with the back


That is really cool. Love the contours of the back. I new of an archtop builder that use to make his body sides the same way. Carved out of a chunk of mohagany. Nice job.

joejeweler
12-26-2011, 06:39 PM
I would think a one piece carved out back and side makeup would have to have a very well cured piece to start with, to avoid as much as possible cracks showing up later. But i guess that's important in every build anyway,......just seems even more so here. Too high a moisture content and you're in trouble. A thick piece of wood in starting means a LONG curing time if not kiln dried.

For sure a savings on side bending equipement, body forms while assembling, etc.

.....and it does look mighty comfortable to hold!

I've always liked the way the old bowl backed mandolins were put together, and wondered when someone was going to put together a ukulele with sides assembled from alternating lighter and darker rosewood strips held together by being glued to the liner. (solid liner possibly,....not kerfed for added support?) Maybe someday???

cheers,
Joe T

BlackBearUkes
12-26-2011, 07:25 PM
The thing about old bowl back mandolins is that they are not put together very well. The majority of them have very small neck blocks which make them easy to come apart, plus the pressure from the strings brings the neck up over time making them impossible to play and repair. Also, the side strips usually dry at different rates because they are different woods and age breaks them apart, a real nightmare to repair. That is a good reason not to repeat this design. Not to mention a deep bodied uke like that would sound wolfy and muddy with nylon strings. The thought of a uke like this makes me shutter.

Braden
12-26-2011, 09:18 PM
to mention a deep bodied uke like that would sound wolfy and muddy with nylon strings. The thought of a uke like this makes me shutter.

Wouldn't it be similar in shape to a pineapple uke?
Also, what about simulating the lined effect with inlay? Say a solid mahogany body with alternating maple (or similar light wood) strips?

thehappyukulele
12-27-2011, 02:32 AM
I've built four of these so far and the oldest is only a year old so I may not know about cracking problems for some time.

As for saving on bending equipment and forms, it does do that, but they take a long time to make so I don't know if it's a winning proposition.

As for comfort...they are a dream to hold! No sharp corners, very thin body, comforting weight (my personal preference).

DAve




I would think a one piece carved out back and side makeup would have to have a very well cured piece to start with, to avoid as much as possible cracks showing up later. But i guess that's important in every build anyway,......just seems even more so here. Too high a moisture content and you're in trouble. A thick piece of wood in starting means a LONG curing time if not kiln dried.

For sure a savings on side bending equipement, body forms while assembling, etc.

.....and it does look mighty comfortable to hold!

I've always liked the way the old bowl backed mandolins were put together, and wondered when someone was going to put together a ukulele with sides assembled from alternating lighter and darker rosewood strips held together by being glued to the liner. (solid liner possibly,....not kerfed for added support?) Maybe someday???

cheers,
Joe T

wolfybau
12-27-2011, 04:11 AM
i like it! I have a monkey pod tray that is shaped like a peanut uke that Ive thought for a while would make a great instrument. would love to hear the sound of this.

gokidd
12-27-2011, 04:24 AM
Another really gorgeous creation, Dave!
I love the variety in your work.
The Milk Paint designs on some of your keystone tenors is so cool! Maybe you could do one featuring "See Rock City" from the billboards (and barn roofs) in the Southern U.S.???

thistle3585
12-27-2011, 05:02 AM
The thing about old bowl back mandolins is that they are not put together very well. The majority of them have very small neck blocks which make them easy to come apart, plus the pressure from the strings brings the neck up over time making them impossible to play and repair. Also, the side strips usually dry at different rates because they are different woods and age breaks them apart, a real nightmare to repair. That is a good reason not to repeat this design. Not to mention a deep bodied uke like that would sound wolfy and muddy with nylon strings. The thought of a uke like this makes me shutter.

Check out Brian Dean for a successful modern day bowl back design. A true craftsman. http://www.labraid.ca/ The grand concert is a true work of art.

thehappyukulele
12-27-2011, 05:33 AM
Ha Ha my Dad has a monkey pod bowl I've been eyeing too! Kind of a weird shape, but that's never stopped me in the past.


i like it! I have a monkey pod tray that is shaped like a peanut uke that Ive thought for a while would make a great instrument. would love to hear the sound of this.

mzuch
12-27-2011, 05:37 AM
+1 on Brian Dean. I own one of his Lyon & Healy inspired mandolins. IMO, Brian is one of the best builders in the fretted string instruments world right now. He has a remarkable ability to combine off-the-charts aesthetics with amazing tone and playability.

thehappyukulele
12-27-2011, 05:39 AM
Hey thanks so much. I love the barn roof look and milk paint is perfect for it. I'm working on a milk paint tenor called "Matanuska" right now that has a native American-look painting. I just need to finish the moonface. I'm going to let the grain of the wood show through the face.

31486


Another really gorgeous creation, Dave!
I love the variety in your work.
The Milk Paint designs on some of your keystone tenors is so cool! Maybe you could do one featuring "See Rock City" from the billboards (and barn roofs) in the Southern U.S.???

gokidd
12-27-2011, 05:46 AM
i'm working on a milk paint tenor called "matanuska" right now that has a native american-look painting. I just need to finish the moonface. I'm going to let the grain of the wood show through the face.

31486

oh, yeahh!!!!!!

ksquine
12-29-2011, 01:04 PM
Very interesting. I like how you fit the heel cap onto the body. Can't wait for the sound clip

Pueo
12-29-2011, 01:12 PM
Very nice design, and she sure is a looker!
I am a huge Formula One fan and when I saw the title of the thread I was expecting something made from Carbon Fiber hahaha.

thehappyukulele
12-30-2011, 02:13 AM
On my semi-hollows the neck inserts into the body about 5mm. So the heel cap actually covers the seam and adds some strength too I suppose. I do like the way it looks though, so now I do it on some of my acoustics too.


Very interesting. I like how you fit the heel cap onto the body. Can't wait for the sound clip

thehappyukulele
12-30-2011, 02:16 AM
Ha Ha sorry to mislead you with the F1 moniker Pueo. I love F1 too. Rolling, extreme performance art.


Very nice design, and she sure is a looker!
I am a huge Formula One fan and when I saw the title of the thread I was expecting something made from Carbon Fiber hahaha.