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tklansek
09-24-2008, 04:28 PM
I was wondering what the general plan was when a song written for guitar (as tends to be the case) has split chords. I have been using the sheep entertainment ukulele chord finder, but it does not do split chords. The chord im looking for a supplement for in particular is D/F#, but I would like to know how to fix this problem should it come up again. thanks!

ukusaurus
09-24-2008, 05:34 PM
I may be wrong but I'm pretty sure you play a D then quickly change to F#. 2 different chords.

Kanaka916
09-24-2008, 05:39 PM
Try the search feature,
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2624
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3459

NotoriousMOK
09-24-2008, 05:41 PM
That should be a D-chord with an F# bass, so I think 7655 works if it sounds right in your song (assuming re-entrant / standard tuning).

Have fun!

Ukulele JJ
09-24-2008, 07:45 PM
Speaking only for myself, I feel a re-entrant uke has such a narrow pitch range that it rarely makes a difference what note really is in the "bass" (i.e., is the lowest note played).

I find that it's usually better just to play the chord shape that gives me the best "voice leading" (the smallest movement from the notes in the previous chord to the notes in the new chord) and let the bass notes fall where they may.

After all, with the standard, open chords, the lowest note is rarely the root (it is with C and D, but not with F, G, A, E7, Hawaiian D7, etc.) In other words, those are often slash chords even when the arrangement is calling for normal, root-position chords. It still sounds okay though!

JJ

Howlin Hobbit
09-24-2008, 08:43 PM
After all, with the standard, open chords, the lowest note is rarely the root (it is with C and D, but not with F, G, A, E7, Hawaiian D7, etc.)

Hell, the "Hawaiian D7" doesn't even have the root note in it.

SamWise
09-25-2008, 03:15 AM
What, pray tell, is the Hawaiian D7?

Ukulele JJ
09-25-2008, 03:43 AM
What, pray tell, is the Hawaiian D7?

2020

And yeah, as HH said, there's no "D" note anywhere in it! :p

It's technically an F# diminished (in second inversion, no less).

JJ

Kanaka916
09-25-2008, 04:01 AM
What, pray tell, is the Hawaiian D7?
2023 . . . I'm pretty sure that's what's being talked about and that's the way I've seen it played on a number of traditional songs. Actually it's Am5, but it works in the chord progression as well as vamps.

Ukulele JJ
09-25-2008, 06:02 AM
2023 . . . I'm pretty sure that's what's being talked about and that's the way I've seen it played on a number of traditional songs. Actually it's Am5, but it works in the chord progression as well as vamps.


That's interesting. I've always seen it as 2020, but 2023 works too.

The main difference between the two versions is which note you're "doubling" on the first string. With 2020, it's the A note that's being played by both the first (open) and fourth (fretted) strings. With 2023, you're playing a C note on both the first (fretted) and third (open) strings... although they're an octave apart.

In either case, you're only getting three different notes: F#, A, and C. That's an F# diminished triad.


A "real" D7 is D-F#-A-C. So with a Hawaiian D you're getting three out of the four, only missing the D (root)

You mentioned Am5, but I think you meant Am6. Anyway, you're right--this chords works well for that too.

A "real" Am6 is A-C-E-F#. Again, the Hawaiian D7 gives you three out of four notes. But this time, the missing note is E (the fifth).



JJ

SeanKy671
09-25-2008, 02:53 PM
i don't care.. i hate split chords lol
no i'm joking..

theyre just confusing sometimes :/