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View Full Version : laquering over paint/permanent marker



meggles
01-09-2012, 04:54 PM
Hi all,

brand new here!

i got my uke last week and i took it to a gig and got it signed, i don't want the signatures to come off so i was wondering if anyone could recommend a lacquer to put over them?

will re-lacquering affect it?
it's only a cheap one but still, i want it to be usable!

please note i'm in australia so some of the awesome sounding lacquers from america might not be available to me!

thank you in advance

xo meggles

dustartist
01-09-2012, 06:10 PM
The solvent in lacquer will probably make the ink run, you'll have to use something that won't dissolve the ink.

Liam Ryan
01-09-2012, 08:45 PM
The first place to go for such matters is the website of the patron saint of luthery - Saint Frank Ford.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luthier/Technique/Finish/CelebSig/celebsigsig.html

Allen
01-09-2012, 09:36 PM
Really depends on what it was signed with, but there aren't many things people normally use that are really all that permanent. Quality lacquer available locally is Mirotone. It's what most all Aussie luthiers use on their instruments. We use it the old fashioned way of getting it in a 4 litre tin and another can of thinners, but they make it in a pressure pack now, so it's relatively simple for even a novice to get a coat of it on something. Whether or not it will stuff up the sig is anyones guess.

If you can try the same marker on something else to test it out then that would be my recommendation.

Braden
01-09-2012, 09:52 PM
Amanda Palmer?

Also, I echo the idea of whatever you try to use, attempt it on a test surface first.

Now, this is probably going to sound pretty ghetto, but if it's a cheap-o uke, then how about just some cellophane tape?

novocaine
01-09-2012, 10:14 PM
you will need to use a spray lacquer instead of a brushed on the signed area. this way you wont be dragging across the marker pen. maybe use something like plasticote over just the signed areas first (masked off) then use a decent brushed lacquer for the rest. it will also need to be oil based which is the hard part, a water based lacquer will make the ink run.

Trinimon
01-10-2012, 01:51 AM
If it's a cheap uke and the autographs are that valuable to you, buy a new cheap uke and hang this one up on the wall. If you're spending just as much to preserve the autographs, ya might as well put that towards a uke. :p

meggles
01-10-2012, 11:34 AM
woah, that looks amazing, i am looking for an easy solution though but somehow, i don't think there is one!

meggles
01-10-2012, 11:37 AM
Really depends on what it was signed with, but there aren't many things people normally use that are really all that permanent. Quality lacquer available locally is Mirotone. It's what most all Aussie luthiers use on their instruments. We use it the old fashioned way of getting it in a 4 litre tin and another can of thinners, but they make it in a pressure pack now, so it's relatively simple for even a novice to get a coat of it on something. Whether or not it will stuff up the sig is anyones guess.

If you can try the same marker on something else to test it out then that would be my recommendation.

Thanks so much for the information. They signed in Sharpie marker, it comes off if I rub my finger over it, so I'm avoiding that!

Mirotone looks awesome. I've emailed them although I don't know how much help they'll be able to give me, looking at the Pre-catalysed Lacquers, fingers crossed they can help me!

meggles
01-10-2012, 11:38 AM
Amanda Palmer?

yes Amanda Palmer! :) and Brian, and Tom and Jen from the Jane Austen Argument.
Cellophane tape will yellow though won't it?

meggles
01-10-2012, 11:55 AM
you will need to use a spray lacquer instead of a brushed on the signed area. this way you wont be dragging across the marker pen. maybe use something like plasticote over just the signed areas first (masked off) then use a decent brushed lacquer for the rest. it will also need to be oil based which is the hard part, a water based lacquer will make the ink run.

I think the Plastikote Industrial Clear Acrylic spray might work, not sure if it's water based or not though.
Thanks for your help!

meggles
01-10-2012, 11:59 AM
If it's a cheap uke and the autographs are that valuable to you, buy a new cheap uke and hang this one up on the wall. If you're spending just as much to preserve the autographs, ya might as well put that towards a uke. :p


I've thought about that but I really want to preserve the sigs anyway, wouldn't want someone taking it off the wall and ruining them!

dustartist
01-10-2012, 01:20 PM
Lacquer will dissolve Sharpie ink. So will alcohol. You should try a sample first to see what works. You could also mist on some really light and dry coats until you had enough of a build to hit it with a final coat on top.

Trinimon
01-10-2012, 02:03 PM
Found this but as others say, test before using it on the real deal.

http://www.ehow.com/how_7695485_preserve-permanent-pen-autographed-guitar.html

meggles
01-10-2012, 03:07 PM
Found this but as others say, test before using it on the real deal.

http://www.ehow.com/how_7695485_preserve-permanent-pen-autographed-guitar.html

That is super helpful, I have some hair spray at home so I'll try it tonight on the back of my uke.

Maybe after a few layers of hairspray I'll try a fine layer of lacquer, cause i kinda still want to play it :)

One day I want to paint the back of it!

meggles
01-10-2012, 03:08 PM
Thanks for your suggestion, I'll have a play with various things on the back of my uke and see what happens :)

novocaine
01-10-2012, 08:55 PM
plasticote is now water based.

Braden
01-10-2012, 08:59 PM
I saw Amanda, Neil and JAA when they came here to Vancouver in November. I was really impressed with Jane Austen Argument.
I had brought an unfinished spruce top for AFP and Neil to sign (I was going to build a "This machine kills the machine" uke), but the line was far too long and I would have missed the train home. Hopefully she'll be back. I still have the top.

Tape would yellow. You are right. Didn't think that through.

What about epoxy or some other kind of resin? You'd just need a thin layer over the signatures.

I'm in the process of applying lacquer in my first uke build, so I'll play around with a sharpie and some scraps in the shop.

Good luck!

meggles
01-15-2012, 05:06 PM
What about epoxy or some other kind of resin? You'd just need a thin layer over the signatures.

I'm in the process of applying lacquer in my first uke build, so I'll play around with a sharpie and some scraps in the shop.

Good luck!

Currently looking at getting Z-Poxy and seeing how that goes.

If you could have a play around that would be so super awesome! Let me know how it goes :)

The JAA are so cool, I have a ridiculous photo of them with my uke, they also signed it :)

Let me know how that experimenting goes and if you find a solution be sure to tell me!:D

gyosh
01-15-2012, 06:19 PM
Use an iPad screen film

dave g
01-16-2012, 02:36 AM
Lacquer will work fine. Me and my Mom collaborated on several like this a couple years ago: http://www.wsukes.com/93/u93.html I gave her the uke body with a couple coats on it, then she painted and traced around the paint with a fine "Sharpie" marker. I then sprayed on several more coats of lacquer. Holding up well!

Braden
01-17-2012, 08:03 PM
Hi meggles...

So, I applied z-poxy to a test piece of engleman spruce and sharpie. It's still curing, but I'll post a pic of the result after it's dry. So far what I've noticed is that there is *some* running, but the original writing is still legible (well, as legible as my writing gets anyway ;))

DPO
01-18-2012, 08:41 AM
Here's an article on the subject. Protecting P McCartney's signature.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luthier/Technique/Finish/Celebsig/celebsigsig.html

DPO

Liam Ryan
01-18-2012, 09:34 AM
It there an echo in here?:D

DPO
01-18-2012, 09:43 AM
It there an echo in here?
I presume this was aimed at me. So sorry to have upset a senior member. Then again you could have just ignored my mistake and moved on.

Liam Ryan
01-18-2012, 12:35 PM
I presume this was aimed at me. So sorry to have upset a senior member. Then again you could have just ignored my mistake and moved on.

Nothing senior, nor upset with me. Ive edited my post to add a smilie. Tone can be, and was, lost in the written form.

Seriously though, Frets.com should be the first port of call for anyone contemplating any sort of instrument repair or maintenance. It's amazing how diverse and thorough Frank Ford's website is. The topics covered run all the way from re-stringing and cleaning your instrument to full blown restorations of heavily damaged, 150 year old priceless instruments. In fact, the website itself is a priceless resource to all of us.

Braden
01-18-2012, 08:16 PM
32547

Based on the single test I did, I wouldn't recommend using z-poxy. The image is a bit blurry because I enlarged it, but you can see that it did cause some of the ink to run. I'll be back in the shop tomorrow and am in the midst of applying coats of KTM-9, which is a water-based lacquer, to a uke. It would be no trouble to do a test with the KTM-9, as I'm sitting around waiting for the stuff to dry anyway.

Or you can take the word of these other, more experienced, gentlemen!

meggles
01-19-2012, 12:43 PM
Lacquer will work fine. Me and my Mom collaborated on several like this a couple years ago: http://www.wsukes.com/93/u93.html I gave her the uke body with a couple coats on it, then she painted and traced around the paint with a fine "Sharpie" marker. I then sprayed on several more coats of lacquer. Holding up well!

Hey Dave,

Can you remember what type of lacquer you used?
That uke is so pretty by the way :)

meggles
01-19-2012, 12:45 PM
32547

Based on the single test I did, I wouldn't recommend using z-poxy. The image is a bit blurry because I enlarged it, but you can see that it did cause some of the ink to run. I'll be back in the shop tomorrow and am in the midst of applying coats of KTM-9, which is a water-based lacquer, to a uke. It would be no trouble to do a test with the KTM-9, as I'm sitting around waiting for the stuff to dry anyway.

Or you can take the word of these other, more experienced, gentlemen!

Hey Braden, thanks for testing it out for me! :)
how did you apply it?

it looks better than the hair spray i tested on the back of my uke, that stuff made the sharpie disappear!

Braden
01-19-2012, 08:28 PM
I just scraped it on using a popsicle stick.

Braden
01-20-2012, 09:26 PM
32621

I believe the learned gentlemen are correct. This is a scrap piece of mahogany after two coats of KMT-9, a water-based lacquer. There are no runs that I can see. I think this would be your best bet in preserving all those sigs! Good luck and please do post a pic when you're done!

kavya
03-01-2013, 06:56 PM
Sharpie oil-based paint markers mark opaque and glossy on light and dark surfaces. Perfect for use on metal, pottery, glass, plastic, and more!

ukegirl13
03-01-2013, 07:06 PM
If it's a cheap uke and the autographs are that valuable to you, buy a new cheap uke and hang this one up on the wall. If you're spending just as much to preserve the autographs, ya might as well put that towards a uke. :p

I like your idea!! Just hang it up and enjoy it. Don't risk messing it up (if it's that important that is).

Rick Turner
03-01-2013, 07:49 PM
Bill Tapia's autograph has worn away from the top of my uke, but I still see it there...

hcp
03-04-2013, 08:18 AM
Ceap uke? I'd just buy a spray can of clear lacquer from a car spares shop, then take the strings off and mask the fretboard and saddle and build up in very thin layers (to avoid runs and ink damage) over several days or even a couple of weeks. Practice first.