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View Full Version : Considering Purchasing a Guitar... Am I Selling Out??



mendel
01-11-2012, 01:12 PM
Hello Everyone,

I recently submitted what I pray is my final draft of my research proposal for my Dissertation. As such, I have a few minutes freed up to check in on my UU peeps!

Here is my new dilemma. I love playing the Uke. I will always play the Uke. There is no part of me that would consider putting it down, never to be played again. That said, I am considering picking up a 6 string axe to play as well. I have only been playing the Uke for about a year and 3 months or so, but I am enjoying it thoroughly. I think that I would like to learn some guitar as well, primarily because I think that learning about another fretted instrument will make me more knowledgeable about music theory, as well as the more readily available guitar enthusiasts in my area being able to teach me new and exciting techniques that can then cross over back to my Uke playing.

Am I selling out, or am I simply taking the next logical step? I grew up as a wrestler. As a wrestler, I will always love the sport, but when I found out about Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, I chose to learn that as well because of the massive amount of technique cross-over between the two sports. It was the best decision I ever made, and I know that my wrestling ability benefitted greatly from it. Will the same thing happen here?

Mendel

PoiDog
01-11-2012, 01:15 PM
Why would you think it is selling out? They are two different instruments. Would you be afraid you were selling out if you wanted to try playing the clarinet, or piano, or violin?

At the very worst (or best) you'd find (like I did when I tried) that the guitar isn't the right fit for you after all, and you'll go back to your uke. Or you might find the opposite, and fall in love with your guitar. Or, like so many folks here, you'll find time and context for both.

The important thing isn't to stubbornly hang on to one thing at all costs, but to find what brings you the most satisfaction.

So go get your guitar and give it a try! And keep us posted.

Gwynedd
01-11-2012, 01:16 PM
I don't think so. They are different instruments, but related. I started uke as a kid, moved on to a baritone uke (it was a present, so being a kid, I just played it. I didn't even realize the tuning was so different.) Then I ended up playing guitar in college, which was an easy transition from the baritone. Since my "real" instrument is piano, I stayed with that and dropped guitar over time. Later I picked up the flute just to learn it, but I realized, any instrument can be a joy to play if you get good at it. They are all different. A ukulele is most definitely NOT a guitar. Similar, but not the same.

Dan Uke
01-11-2012, 01:16 PM
Nothing wrong as there are many crossovers from guitar players. However, uke players are not as snobby as guitar players so you will get support from us. There's plenty of love for all instruments. Good luck

Ukuleleblues
01-11-2012, 01:20 PM
Here is a cool way to get used to the extra strings and still take full advantage of your uke skills.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/yamaha-mini-6-string-nylon-guitarlele

Olarte
01-11-2012, 01:24 PM
Why not play both?

I thought the opposite, am I "cheating" will I become disinterested in classical guitar if I start messing with uke and the answer is a big fat NO.

I love playing both, they are different enough that they are simply roads on my journey in life. I am dead serious about classical guitar, but the Uke it's plain fun, and eventhough I plan to play some classical music on it, the feel, the sound, the experience between the two are like night and day and I enjoy both.

garywj
01-11-2012, 01:28 PM
It was the other way for me. I played the guitar for years and one day picked up a uke. If there is any disadvantage, it is that guitar and uke playing are two very different styles. I think I play the uke like a guitar - especially when I play picking style. If you are getting a steel string guitar, you will have to get the hand muscles and finger calluses built up. If you have played anything but a baritone uke, the chord fingering will be different. For me, the instruments feel so different that I am not able to play one and pick up the other and play it right away. It takes an hour for me to get used to that instrument again. And if you get a classical guitar, you will find the neck width and size to be much harder to adjust to. An electric solid body guitar (most of them) have a narrow neck, more resembling the uke. I think you will find that after the novelty of play something new wears off, you will have a tendency to play one or the other most of the time - which ever one you enjoy the most. For me, that has turned out to be the uke. One more thing - my experience is that guitar players are a little more serious about perfecting their skills and emulating really good players. I don't take that as good or bad, but I enjoy the casual approach of many uke players I have met.

102263
01-11-2012, 01:39 PM
I'm also thinking of learning the guitar. As I was researching cheap guitars, I found the Yamaha guitalele, which you might want to check out. Apparently it's the size of a tenor ukulele, but with six strings that produce those lower notes that I'm looking for in a guitar (tuned ADGCEA). I thought a guitalele might make the transition from uke to guitar easier for me, but now I'm pretty sure I'm just going straight for the guitar.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrHL0BrbLOk&feature=related

GVlog
01-11-2012, 01:51 PM
We are musicians first and foremost and will share music with the world using whatever instrument that we choose, that we can acquire and that we can spend the time to master.
:)




Now, ... can somebody please donate to me a set of Great Highland Bagpipes or even kitchen pipes?

stevepetergal
01-11-2012, 01:53 PM
Yea . You're selling out.

Drew Bear
01-11-2012, 01:53 PM
Definitely not selling out. I bought a classical guitar last week and am pleasantly surprised that muscle memory kicked in despite over a decade away from the instrument. The guitar satisfies any low G cravings.

mm stan
01-11-2012, 02:29 PM
My friend says the uke has improved his guitar playing...hmmmm

fitncrafty
01-11-2012, 02:41 PM
Hello Everyone,

I recently submitted what I pray is my final draft of my research proposal for my Dissertation. As such, I have a few minutes freed up to check in on my UU peeps!

Here is my new dilemma. I love playing the Uke. I will always play the Uke. There is no part of me that would consider putting it down, never to be played again. That said, I am considering picking up a 6 string axe to play as well. I have only been playing the Uke for about a year and 3 months or so, but I am enjoying it thoroughly. I think that I would like to learn some guitar as well, primarily because I think that learning about another fretted instrument will make me more knowledgeable about music theory, as well as the more readily available guitar enthusiasts in my area being able to teach me new and exciting techniques that can then cross over back to my Uke playing.

Am I selling out, or am I simply taking the next logical step? I grew up as a wrestler. As a wrestler, I will always love the sport, but when I found out about Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, I chose to learn that as well because of the massive amount of technique cross-over between the two sports. It was the best decision I ever made, and I know that my wrestling ability benefitted greatly from it. Will the same thing happen here?

Mendel

First congrats on such progress on your dissertation! Awesome! Buy a basic guitar and give it a go. If you like it, beg Bradford to build you a giant version of hugs and kisses for you to love.. I have drooled over many guitar while my boys are taking lessons, however, I can barely play the uke so another instrument for me is a bad idea. I think if you desire to learn, and you have the time and means (money) go for it and enjoy. Just don't forget us! :)
Nice to see you around here, How's the little one?

itsme
01-11-2012, 03:11 PM
I'm a bit of a lapsed classical guitarist who fell under the uke's spell. Now whenever I pull out one of my guitars, it just feels awkwardly huge.


As I was researching cheap guitars, I found the Yamaha guitalele, which you might want to check out.
I just got my Guitalele yesterday, kind of as a ploy to get myself back into guitar. I'm quite impressed with the quality of the build for a $100 instrument. And I'm having an absolute blast with it so far. :)

Bought mine off Amazon, as I had been saving up gift credits for it. Then when I had enough, there weren't any vendors offering free 2-day shipping with Prime. So I looked at those that offered free shipping and chose the one closest to me. Day after ordering, there was a vendor offering Prime and I considered canceling and re-ordering but didn't.

Gotta give a shout out to Southwest Strings (http://www.swstrings.com/). They are a real B&M store in Tucson, AZ specializing in stringed instruments (duh!). They do a set up on everything they sell and said to allow an extra day for that. Well, I ordered late Thursday, they shipped Friday (FedEx) and I had it on Tuesday, pretty darn decent for "free standard shipping". Very well packed (double boxed) and it plays beautifully.

The included gig bag is really cheesy and cheap, but at least they include one and it'll keep the dust off. It does fit into several of my tenor cases, so there's always that option if I want to take it out and about.

Anyway, for an uke player looking to get into guitar, I think the Guitalele is a really good and inexpensive option to see if six strings are for you. :)

dredey
01-11-2012, 04:03 PM
[QUOTE=GVlog;842659]We are musicians first and foremost and will share music with the world using whatever instrument that we choose, that we can acquire and that we can spend the time to master.
:)

Very well said....My thoughts exactly. I play both and love them both equally.

uke4ia
01-11-2012, 04:15 PM
Am I selling out, or am I simply taking the next logical step?

Yes! You're dead to me now.

:rolleyes:

Glad to see you made it through the high-stress period okay. Cross-pollinating your knowledge of instruments will probably help you on both of them. Personally, I tried picking up guitar a couple of years after I started playing uke (late 1970s), and even that early on I couldn't get my fingers used to stretching as far as they had to for guitar chords. I ended up learning keyboards instead.

rasputinsghost
01-11-2012, 08:04 PM
Nah. Being good at any other instrument will improve your uke skills (and musicianship overall).

zac987
01-11-2012, 11:20 PM
You're not "selling" out, lol. If I heard nothing but music played on the ukulele for the rest of my life, I would probably kill myself. Similarly, if I heard nothing but acoustic guitar-based tunes for the rest of myself, I would probably head to the same fate. Variety is awesome. I have a ukulele, a guitar, a tiple, and a few banjos, and I love them all.

If you do get a guitar, I would recommend a Recording King. They are very well-built for the money, and have solid spruce tops. This is what I have:
http://www.amazon.com/Recording-King-OOO-Style-Acoustic-Mahogany/dp/B002IC1DDQ/ref=wl_it_dp_o_npd?ie=UTF8&coliid=I39XNGZZ3SPCOK&colid=3HRGKC0QCPYFL

Gwynedd
01-11-2012, 11:32 PM
"The story about the "invention" of the baritone uke is that it was designed for young people to learn and then move onto a guitar. Many great guitarists have been photographed as children holding a uke."

Certainly true for me. I moved right into guitar off the baritone. It was enjoyable --played during college back "when" guitars were a necessary accessory along with tie-dyed tee shirts and love beads. THOSE were the days.

AetherBlue
01-12-2012, 02:07 AM
Ahah, selling out? The uke and guitar are brothers. Versatility is never a bad thing, especially when it comes to music. I started on the guitar and than went to ukulele, the ukulele definitely made me a better guitar player overall. They are both different and similar, I appreciate both qualities. Aside from the obvious two extra strings the guitar generally requires more physical effort.(Calluses, size of frets, bigger/heavier.)

cahaya
01-12-2012, 03:28 AM
Learning another instrument is not like wanting another wife :) Although I am sure someone in this forum will challenge me on that.

Go for it. There are many musicians/singers out there who can play several instruments. I am sure you be glad after learning another musical instrument.

A standard guitar is way bigger than a uke. The classical guitar especially will get you to do some serious fingers streching.

Maxjunk
01-12-2012, 11:15 AM
I've tried my mom's old guitar a few times, it just isn't my type of thing.

Teek
01-12-2012, 01:14 PM
Nah. Getting a BARITONE guitar, maybe. ;)

+1 for the Yamaha guitalele, I can't get my fingers to let go of it, and anytime I take it out thinking about selling it, I slap myself and think "What?! Am I crazy?" Don't answer that please.

The guitalele is awesome for the price. It will need a setup but be very nice when done. Then after you figure out if six strings are for you, you can go up in scale. I really like the 19 inch scale guitars I have. It seems to be about all I can reach.

Tudorp
01-12-2012, 02:08 PM
Haven't read the whole thread yet. But thought I would reply anyway. No, your not selling out. Music crosses over many instruments, especially amoung the same family (in this case strings). Many expand their love of making music and cross bridges. unless ya just burn the bridge, they go in both directions. I started out many years ago playing bass. A few short years, expanded into guitar, but still playing bass too. Many years later, expanded even more to the uke. I love them all. I like uke for what it is. I like guitar for what it is. Love bass, for what it is. I wish I could play them all at the same time, but sorry, they have to share.. ;). When I moved to Uke, I never felt I was abandoning guitar, so why should someone that moves to guitar feel they feel they are abandoning the uke?

1931jim
01-12-2012, 02:23 PM
Well said Tudorp. Variety is the spice of life. Round out your skills early, you never know when you are asked. "Do you play folk, or rock, or classical.? Whenever you have experienced them all then you just say....Don't thank me, just pay me.

mendel
01-12-2012, 02:57 PM
Thank you all for the positive feedback. I am excited to see what happens when I do pick one up. I am thinking that I might do it in the next month or so once I shop around and determine exactly what I am looking for.

kissing
01-13-2012, 12:56 AM
I like the sound and versatility of a guitar. The sustain that steel strings + larger body produces is certainly very useful, and it's no surprise why the guitar is such a popular and successful instrument.

However, I could never play 6 strings, and I really do not like the narrower spacings between the strings.


But I did find a way to enjoy a "guitar", without having to "learn to play a guitar".


I got one of these:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3372-C-Ozark-Tenor-Guitar-Cutaway-Electro-Acoustic-Solid-Spruce-Top-Free-Mainla-/390381147417?pt=UK_Musical_Instruments_Sting_Instr uments&hash=item5ae4879519

Some of the best money I ever spent.
Tune it to baritone ukulele tuning (DGBE) just using regular DGBE acoustic guitar strings, and voila. You have something that produces a guitar tone, but is played like a uke.

And not only that, it's a great instrument to boot. You get a bright, full sounding solid spruce top, great gloss + vintage sunburst finish and great craftsmanship and design. The electronics are one of the best I've encountered on an acoustic-electric and plus you get a great quality custom hardcase!

fretie
01-13-2012, 06:28 AM
Adding an instrument to your life, if you have the time and means, is an enriching experience. As others on this thread have mentioned, it actually enhances your musical abilities rather than detracts from them to add to your range of musical competency.

I play japanese bamboo flute and in need to some more melodic balance I started to play the mountain dulcimer. The dulcimer seemed easy to learn and play compared to the flute. Now that I stumbled upon the uke the dulcimer has gathered a bit of dust and I think if I had met the uke first the dulcimer might not have been able to compete. Throughout this musical journey the flute has held its own and I dedicate my most serious practice time to it but, between you and me, I have the most fun when I play the uke.

So, forge ahead, expand your musical horizons, its likely to be fun and fascinating for you.

ukecantdothat
01-13-2012, 02:50 PM
I like the sound and versatility of a guitar.... and I really do not like the narrower spacings between the strings...
Dig that mini Firebird!

webby
01-13-2012, 11:07 PM
Nah, you're not selling out, you are just naturally progressing to a real instrument now, it happens sometimes :)

(webby ducks for cover !)


lol

zac987
01-14-2012, 03:08 AM
^ and this is why I never go into Guitar Center

mendel
01-14-2012, 06:18 AM
Make no mistake.... The Uke is as real as it gets. The guitar will always be second fiddle, so to speak...

Shazzbot
01-14-2012, 06:59 AM
Perhaps the ukulele is like marijuana.......
A gateway drug to the music world!
Yikes! I just realized I am a junkie!
Now they will try to make me go to rehab and I'll say No! No! No!

ukuhippo
01-14-2012, 07:11 AM
All kind words, but I'm getting the tar and the feathers.

sunstrummer
01-14-2012, 07:50 AM
You are not selling out at all. I started with the ukulele, got okay at it, then went to the guitar, and became a better uke player because of it. There are more guitar masters than ukulele masters (unfortunately), so learning the guitar will make you a better ukulele player. Good luck.

YooperUker
01-17-2012, 03:28 PM
Am I selling out, or am I simply taking the next logical step?

Ah, heck no! Just relax. It's not selling out. . .it's slumming.