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ichadwick
01-29-2012, 01:53 PM
Uke players thinking of migrating to the guitar? Here's a tip: do it in stages. Start with a four-string cigar box guitar. That will get you accustomed to the spacing of the frets and also to the tension (and callous-abusing nature) of the steel strings.

After you're comfortable on the cigar-box scale, you can upgrade to a proper six-string.

The cigar-box guitar is an uber-baritone uke you can use to jam with any guitar session, too.

Snorky
02-16-2012, 03:17 AM
sounds like an excuse to give into UAS!

Michael N.
02-22-2012, 12:17 AM
Or just go straight to a Guitalele. The fret scale is very hand friendly and they are pretty cheap. I made a version around 2 years ago and I absolutely adore playing it. One day I'll get around to doing some MP3's on it. It's amazingly loud too, even in comparison to my full size Guitars.

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?32252-Is-it-allowed&highlight=guitalele

allanr
02-22-2012, 03:13 AM
Another route is via short scale guitars. There are quite a few nice options out there. Martin and Taylor both make nice acoustic guitars for travel, small statured people, and uke players. Ibanez, Gibson Epiphone, and Fender Squier make cool mini electrics all of which are between 100 and 200 dollars.

ichadwick
03-04-2012, 02:57 AM
I'm having fun with my CBG. It's a funky instrument and has a wicked sound. Took it into the local music store where they sell Gibson, Epiphone & Fender and everyone wanted to try it and get photos of themselves with it. Like it enough I'm considering getting another.

gitarzan
10-18-2012, 09:29 AM
tenor guitar?

Lalz
10-18-2012, 10:20 AM
Can you consider a cigar box guitar to be a tenor guitar? 4 steel strings...
Or does a guitar need to have a banjo headstock and a floating bridge besides the 4 strings to be considered a tenor?

Wooville
10-25-2012, 08:37 AM
Well, I migrated from the guitar to the ukulele and if you could see my buying pattern, it looks like I'm migrating back....fist was a concert, then a tenor, (a couple of sapranos in between) and now to the baritone and to tell the truth, I've been looking at some parlor guitars. Where will it all end? I guess when I finally work my way back to my martin dreadnaught. <G> Seriously, I think it's whatever you set your mind to. I had been struggling with picking my Martin since spending so much time lately with the Uke's. But I did pick up my guitar last week and really concentrated on playing it and to my amazement, it worked out just fine. I think it's a whole lot of just mind over matter.

wooville


Uke players thinking of migrating to the guitar? Here's a tip: do it in stages. Start with a four-string cigar box guitar. That will get you accustomed to the spacing of the frets and also to the tension (and callous-abusing nature) of the steel strings.

After you're comfortable on the cigar-box scale, you can upgrade to a proper six-string.

The cigar-box guitar is an uber-baritone uke you can use to jam with any guitar session, too.

Garydavkra
10-25-2012, 09:27 AM
Well, I migrated from the guitar to the ukulele and if you could see my buying pattern, it looks like I'm migrating back....fist was a concert, then a tenor, (a couple of sapranos in between) and now to the baritone and to tell the truth, I've been looking at some parlor guitars. Where will it all end? I guess when I finally work my way back to my martin dreadnaught. <G> Seriously, I think it's whatever you set your mind to. I had been struggling with picking my Martin since spending so much time lately with the Uke's. But I did pick up my guitar last week and really concentrated on playing it and to my amazement, it worked out just fine. I think it's a whole lot of just mind over matter.

wooville

Exactly! I also came from the guitar to the ukulele. I get out my guitars every now and then and to my surprise they seem huge! Even my parlor seems big. But, it's just a matter of getting use to it again. I think it would also be cheaper to just go to the guitar and not bother with all the in between steps.

mds725
10-25-2012, 07:23 PM
I have a Blueridge BR-40T tenor guitar (https://www.google.com/search?q=blueridge+br-40t&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a). It's scale length is a bit longer than that of a baritone ukulele, the strings are closer together than baritone ukulele strings (making the neck narrower), and it has steel strings and a fixed (not floating) bridge. Tenor guitars are frequently tuned like tenor banjos (from which they evolved); mine is tuned DGBE, like a baritone ukulele (known as Chicago tuning in the tenor ukulele community), so I didn't have to learn new chord shapes. I love it to death. It sounds like a guitar and has gotten me accustomed to guitar string spacing. I bought mine on eBay from Jamie at Hot Strings Guitars (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Blueridge-Tenor-guitar-w-Blueridge-gig-bag-AND-FREE-DVD-/120940662295?pt=Guitar&hash=item1c28a00e17) in Rhode Island. That's Jamie in the video.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hjsfK69S3w

ChaosToo
05-02-2013, 12:25 PM
I have to say that having very briefly dabbled with guitars, but never having really got into it, I now find that playing the uke has really got me interested in giving guitar a go.

I'm looking for a short scale guitar, but the choices are really limited in the UK (as far as I've been able to tell) - if anyone's got any pointers, or better still a cheap starter (short scale) guitar for sale - I'm on the lookout! :D

mds725
05-03-2013, 09:12 PM
Cordoba makes requintos that can be tuned like guitars (EADGBE). I don't know what their general availability is in the UK.

http://www.cordobaguitars.com/p/requinto-580-12-size

They come in 1/2 (580), 1/4 (520), and 1/8 (480) sizes and sound very nice.

ChaosToo
05-06-2013, 12:29 PM
So - I managed to bag myself a Squier Mini Strat (3/4 size) - secondhand - for the princely sum of £45!! Happy with that - pics to follow when it arrives....... :D

quiltingshirley
05-06-2013, 01:20 PM
I know nothing about guitars other than they're big. I do have a question after reading these posts. Do all guitar strings have to be steel or metal? Ouch. I think ukulele strings hurt, how can you stand it with bare fingertips?

HBolte
05-06-2013, 01:53 PM
There are steel string guitars and Classical guitars. Classical guitars use strings similar to the ukulele.

If you want to play guitar just get a full size guitar. As others above have said, don't waste your money moving up incrementally. That would be just like someone going the opposite way and wasting a lot of money buying several ukes to get from guitar down to a soprano. Like Nike says...just do it!

v30
07-25-2013, 04:41 PM
2 things that I find frustrating with learning guitar, comming from a ukulele are 1. Steel strings 2. Limited (vertical) space on fretboard between strings. The classical guitar is easier to learn on for these 2 reasons.....though that wide fretboard also makes certain chords more difficult, but this may not be an issue for a beginner who's learning basic chords.

Roselynne
07-28-2013, 07:26 PM
I'm with the folks who recommend going straight to a full-on guitar. Less money in the long run, uuuunnnnnless you develop a bad case of GAS.

Before taking the plunge, however, you may want to cruise whatever stores are around, and try out bunches of models. Just hold one (while sitting down, preferably), make a random chord shape or few, and strum. Guitars come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and this should help you find the best possible fit. The guitar you choose may also need a setup, just as many ukuleles do.

(It always helps my jitters to come right out and tell the proprietor that I'm just thinking about starting out.)

Whether you go for steel strings or nylon, your fingers will feel it. This should go away in a week or two as your callouses develop -- if not, the guitar may need a setup, or lighter strings.

gyosh
10-09-2014, 09:51 PM
I
I'm with the folks who recommend going straight to a full-on guitar. Less money in the long run, uuuunnnnnless you develop a bad case of GAS.

Before taking the plunge, however, you may want to cruise whatever stores are around, and try out bunches of models. Just hold one (while sitting down, preferably), make a random chord shape or few, and strum. Guitars come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, and this should help you find the best possible fit. The guitar you choose may also need a setup, just as many ukuleles do.

(It always helps my jitters to come right out and tell the proprietor that I'm just thinking about starting out.)

Whether you go for steel strings or nylon, your fingers will feel it. This should go away in a week or two as your callouses develop -- if not, the guitar may need a setup, or lighter strings.

I just got a Taylor GS Mini because it wasn't a huge transition in to a much larger size. The GS doesn't feel much bigger than a tenor Uke.

Roselynne
10-09-2014, 10:24 PM
For comfy (well, comfier) fingertips, a classical (nylon-string) guitar may be the way to go.

Fingers can learn to stretch over time ... but ... if size is a barrier, you may want to consider a 1/2- or 3/4-size classical. They're often found used in smaller, local shops. The advantage over a tenor guitar or guitalele is that smaller classicals are tuned exactly the same as a full-size (4/4) guitar.

quiltingshirley
10-10-2014, 06:31 AM
Well, after getting a collection of ukuleles, I now have a smaller collection of guitars. I could not get used to metal strings so I do play a classical style - reminds me more of a Uke. I have classical Blackbird for playing outside, camping, etc. My favorite is a Pepe Romero from Romero Creations. The size is perfect. I have no idea what size you'd call it. (I started with. Guitar I bought from Thomas on UU. The top is sinker redwood and sounds wonderful. It's the same size as a baritone). This is helping my playing cause when I get a song, I'll play on both to see which works best. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Complete justification

Teek
10-12-2014, 02:17 PM
I am waiting for another new to me guitar coming on Tuesday, a parlor size body but full scale. I love the scale length at 21.5 on my little Yamaha JR-2 for learning stuff in front of the computer, then I try to stretch onto the full scale. If I can't reach I try with a capo, which raises the tension if I don't tune down first. I do like the feel of the smaller body guitar, and as with ukes I love spruce tops! And I love love love the sound of steel strings!

jminor409
10-14-2014, 01:24 PM
Just get a guitalele ;)

quiltingshirley
10-14-2014, 02:46 PM
I know nothing about guitars other than they're big. I do have a question after reading these posts. Do all guitar strings have to be steel or metal? Ouch. I think ukulele strings hurt, how can you stand it with bare fingertips?

An update, I am now playing a guitar but with nylon strings. My all time favorite is the Pepe Romero Creations one that's close in size to a baritone. No pain and I'm finding it easy to play. Never thought I'd be a uke and guitar player. I like the classical style and it has helped my ukulele playing.

OregonJim
01-02-2015, 10:38 AM
Classical guitars use strings similar to the ukulele.

Plus, the fingerboard is wider and flatter, and thus the string spacing as well.

Ramart
04-05-2015, 10:14 AM
Another route is via short scale guitars. There are quite a few nice options out there. Martin and Taylor both make nice acoustic guitars for travel, small statured people, and uke players. Ibanez, Gibson Epiphone, and Fender Squier make cool mini electrics all of which are between 100 and 200 dollars.

Ibanez also makes a worthy acoustic mini-dreadnought clone of the short-scale Baby Taylor, the Ibanez PF2MHOPN, whose street price is only 43% of the Baby Taylor's (whose biggest difference seems to be a solid-wood top).

Contrary to the OP's cigar-box suggestion, I decided to make the jump directly to six strings, although in a short-scale, "couch guitar" format, via the mini-Ibanez. It's pretty cool to find I can instantly play up the neck of the guitar by remembering that uke chords/shapes are identical on a guitar on closed chords below the fifth fret if one plays only the D-G-B-e strings.

Doc_J
04-21-2015, 05:48 PM
Finally tracked down a Gibson LG 2- 3/4 Arlo Guthrie signature series. 22-7/8 scale. Saw Arlo actually play one! It sounded terrific.


http://youtu.be/Xs-DpuTkMP0

k0k0peli
05-21-2015, 09:34 AM
I've transitioned from dulcimer, to guitar, to mandolin, to tenor-size uke-like cuatra-menor, to soprano uke and banjo-uke, to tenor uke. My big hands feel a little squished at fret #1 or #14 of the sopranos but otherwise I don't see any of those finger-adjustments as being terribly difficult. I *will* admit that a 12-string fretted Cümbüş restrung as a 6-course bowlback banjo-cittern tuned in 5ths (C2-C5) stretches my hands in strange ways. :rolleyes: And yes, the Ovation 12-string seems rather monstrous next to a soprano uke, 5.5 times heavier. But I don't see going from uke to standard guitar as being much more painful than, say, going from guitar to long-neck banjo or electric bass.

Enough of theory. Get thee to music shops and try everything, see what feels right.

LDS714
05-21-2015, 03:43 PM
I've transitioned from dulcimer, to guitar, to mandolin, to tenor-size uke-like cuatra-menor, to soprano uke and banjo-uke, to tenor uke. My big hands feel a little squished at fret #1 or #14 of the sopranos but otherwise I don't see any of those finger-adjustments as being terribly difficult. I *will* admit that a 12-string fretted Cümbüş restrung as a 6-course bowlback banjo-cittern tuned in 5ths (C2-C5) stretches my hands in strange ways. :rolleyes: And yes, the Ovation 12-string seems rather monstrous next to a soprano uke, 5.5 times heavier.
I have no earthly idea what you said there, but I'm impressed nonetheless. :D


But I don't see going from uke to standard guitar as being much more painful than, say, going from guitar to long-neck banjo or electric bass.

The uke to guitar as guitar is to bass comparison is very valid. Totally agree.

Gwynedd
02-08-2017, 02:00 AM
Possibly, a 3/4 guitar. I have one of these Cordoba Proteges (http://amzn.to/2ljRgb2). It's actually less expensive than some of the crummy ukes out there but has a decent sound. It is also quite a bit more portable than a full sized classical guitar. The neck is narrower, and it is easier to play than the full width neck, but it has a good sound. I play it when I'm tired! The practice still is effective when I move over to my full sized guitar.

When I switched from uke to guitar, I could not do a darned thing. I used to play as a kid and I couldn't even make a chord, though I was skilled enough to do a lot of fingerstyle ukulele. But the Protege really helped me get more strength and stretch into my hands.

JackStuart
02-16-2017, 09:11 PM
Hi There!

Thank you for the tip as I am switching to Guitars now. Will it be good to go for Acoustic Travel Guitar? As All Strings Nylon offers variety of cordoba Mini Guitars. I liked it very much. So Should I go for the same or buy any another guitar.

coolkayaker1
02-17-2017, 03:43 AM
Jack, I recently lept from exclusively ukulele X five years to first step in guitar. Astonishingly easy transition once you get over the guitar's wide fretboard and close string spacing. I play fingerstyle and either without pick or just thumb pick. Many great guitars out there, as are zillions of guitar videos. My uke experience really helped. I just used YT guitar tutorials of my favorite songs and went from there...learned the few major guitar chords by playing rock and blues tunes that I enjoy through free tutorial videos.

Here's my guitar suggestion...love this little baby to this day. (But now I own three other acoustic and one electric guitar, too...lol). Cheers.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?118178-Martin-LX1-Guitar-Excellent-for-Ukers

Farp
02-18-2017, 01:35 PM
Meh, pick up the 6-string, add the fingering for the added two strings and get it on. Staging is not necessary.