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View Full Version : Baitone uke CHORD CARDS, so I can memorize chords faster?...



notalent31
02-04-2012, 08:17 AM
I guess most of you play GCEA uke. What I'd really like to do is
memorize most of the DGBE chords in some faster way than I'm
doing now!..

If I had these "friggin" chord cards, it might help my slowly
deteriorating brain!... I mean, I can type pretty fast and that took
some memorizing, but that was years and years ago.....so, I just
thought going from card to card repeatedly, it just might work for me?..

Yes, I know, I could probably create this chord card thing myself, but I"m a pretty sloppy guy when it comes to that kind of thing!... I sure could use some help!...

SO....does anyone know of this "deck of chords" thing?, but for
baritone DGBE uke?..

If you do....I'd be so indebted!...

Grazia amici!....

Gwynedd
02-04-2012, 08:27 AM
I don't, but you can spend a half an hour:
photocopy pages of downloaded cards
laminate if you are feeling fancy
cut up into flash cards

Raygf
02-04-2012, 10:59 AM
Here are links for some baritone ukulele chord charts. I've never seen cards.

Baritone Chord Chart pdf (http://ukulelechords.fm/chords/baritone/)
(http://ukulelechords.fm/chords/baritone/baritone-ukulele-chords.pdf)
Another pdf of Baritone Ukulele Chords (http://www.thecipher.com/Basic_UkeChordsDGBE_Cipher.pdf)

1931jim
02-04-2012, 05:57 PM
Let's slow down your ""slowly deteriorating brain!... "" even more notalent31. The tuning you have chosen is DGBE. Now with your pencil and a piece of paper start with the open D on the string closest to your chin If you are like most of us and are right handed.
Write down D, then D# next, then E, and now we know there is only a half step to F, then F# next, then G. Gosh that is the same note as my next string, proceed writing down the notes and don't forget there are no sharps (or flats) between B and C until you come to the 12th fret on the D string. Now put the piece of paper in your pocket but don't look at it unless you really have to. We have all gone ahead of you paving the way. Next week start on the G string and because you have memorised the D string from the 5th fret (which you realised was a G note) to the B note on the 9th fret you are ready for that B string waiting for you in another week. Come Easter you will not have flash cards or any other little helpers to lose. You already know a C chord is CEG and a G is GBD and A is ACE ( but wait a moment isn't that supposed to be C# instead of C ? ) Yes you are getting it, there was only a half note between the B and C. So in no time you will be just trying to remember the words of your songs instead of where the notes and the chords are. Isn't it good for the brain ? Aren't you glad you didn't look at that piece of paper more than once or maybe twice ? We have all done it. Good luck.

mds725
02-04-2012, 06:49 PM
The chord SHAPES are the same on an ukulele tuned to C (GCEA) as they are on an ukulele tuned to G (DGBE), but they're up a fifth. So when you play the C chord shape (0001) on an ukulele tuned DGBE, you can do the math in your head by counting five notes -- C, D, E, F, G. Voila! 0001 on a DGBE ukulele is a G chord. An F chord on a C scale (i.e, GCEA) ukulele (2010) is? (F, G, A, B, C --> a C chord!) Am (1000) is (A, B, C, D, E) Em; E7 (1202) is (E, F, G, A, B) B7; G7 (0212) is (G, A, B, C, D) D7, and so on.

gyosh
02-04-2012, 07:21 PM
The chord SHAPES are the same on an ukulele tuned to C (GCEA) as they are on an ukulele tuned to G (DGBE), but they're up a fifth. So when you play the C chord shape (0001) on an ukulele tuned DGBE, you can do the math in your head by counting five notes -- C, D, E, F, G. Voila! 0001 on a DGBE ukulele is a G chord. An F chord on a C scale (i.e, GCEA) ukulele (2010) is? (F, G, A, B, C --> a C chord!) Am (1000) is (A, B, C, D, E) Em; E7 (1202) is (E, F, G, A, B) B7; G7 (0212) is (G, A, B, C, D) D7, and so on.

It's this kind of stuff that made me decide to major in English!!!

Raygf
02-05-2012, 12:34 AM
It's this kind of stuff that made me decide to major in English!!!

:biglaugh:

Chopped Liver
02-05-2012, 02:00 AM
:agree: with Raygf!

:biglaugh:

Ukulele JJ
02-05-2012, 02:25 AM
Everyone learns differently, but I wonder if the flashcard approach is really the best way to go about learning the chords. Seems to me that that's sort of like trying to learn to dance by memorizing footstep diagrams. :-)

I'm in the camp that believes that you don't need to sit down and memorize every chord there is. Instead, you need to work on the chords that are used in the song you're learning. Get those down--get your fingers making those shapes and your ears hearing those sounds.

Then move on to a song that has some of those chords but maybe one or two new ones. Learn those. And so on...In other words, the needs of the song dictate the chords you learn, and you learn them as a natural process of playing the song. Eventually you'll wind up knowing a great deal of chords, simply because of your growing song repertoire.

After all, when you learned to type, you didn't just sit in room memorizing a chart of key positions, did you? :-) Nope, you learned to type by typing.

And you didn't just go through the dictionary typing words either. You started with the home row and then added more and more words until the finger movements because automatic. The needs of what you wanted to type drove the words you learned to type. After you've typed enough stuff, you wind up knowing how to type a huge number of words sort of as a "side effect".

Same thing with chords. For me, anyway. As I said, everyone learns differently.

JJ

1931jim
02-05-2012, 02:42 AM
There has been lots of good advice since your posting yesterday afternoon. Further to changing chords, don't forget some of the notes you are learning, as a melodic progression to the next chord in the song.

Ukuleleblues
02-05-2012, 03:46 AM
An easy way is to count 5 notes from the C fingering to get the Baritone chord name using the same fingering.

If it is a C chord fingering, count C Thumb(1), D Index(2), E Middle(3), F Ring (4), G (pinky) 5 - The bartione name is G

E on a "C tuned" uke is a B on a Bartione IE: E F G A B

F on a "C tuned" uke is a C on a Baritone IE: F G A B C

Ab on a "C tuned" Uke is a Eb IE ABCDE

This works because the tunings differ by a 5th.


BTY

If you are going from a Baritone to a C tuned Uke you count 4 instead of 5.

C on a Bartione is an F on a "C tuned" IE C D E F