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roxhum
02-08-2012, 05:02 AM
I just wanted everyone's thoughts/opinions on the standard Baritone tuning DGBE versus the GCEA tuning.
Thanks

countrybumpkin
02-08-2012, 05:07 AM
Have other ukes for GCEA. Haven't played other tunings for bari - been happy with DGBE.

fernandogardinali
02-08-2012, 05:11 AM
I had GCEA low G on my baritone. Sounded great (like a tenor on steroids) but the tension was way to high. I like the DGBE tuning, but I'm not as proficient on it as on the other ukes.

Maybe a high D DGBE will sound good, but I never tested it.

DaveVisi
02-08-2012, 05:15 AM
DGBE is the standard Bari tuning. You'll be snapping strings or worse if you try to tune up without a string change.

Baritones excel at the low end, much moreso than standard smaller ukuleles. I'd play it the way it was intended to be played.

1931jim
02-08-2012, 05:18 AM
Hello Roxanne,
I had my Kent baritone tuned DGBE but then I put a set of Fremont Black line low G tenor on it and tuned it to low
GCEA and it is a completely different sound. The tenor set are long enough to fit the baritone with string to spare.
The gauges are,,,,,1st.....023. 2nd......027. ....3rd......031, 4th.....036, they are all black fluorocarbon strings from Fremont Musical Products in Seattle, Washington.
Regards
Jim
PS: DaveVisi above is correct. One has to be careful and get the correct gauge strings whenever you are increasing the tension on your new Ohana.

didgeridoo2
02-08-2012, 05:25 AM
I just put a set of southcoast flat linear strings tuned to low Bb. It sounds pretty good and it's only one step down from c tuning.

mm stan
02-08-2012, 05:45 AM
Yes the GCEA tuning is too bright and high tension for me...and my weak finga's....plus I prefer the rich tone of the DGBE isn't that what the baritone is for.. what's the purpose if you
change it to GCEA.. oh well that's just me.. I even drop tune mine for more richness... and suits my voice better and slows down the tempo...
I wouldn't think of even buying GCEA string to try it out..yes you gotta change
them to be safe... I did it, but don't recommend it...:)

roxhum
02-08-2012, 05:51 AM
Thanks for your replies. That was my thought too, that why get a baritone if you use the GCEA tuning but I have read of others doing that. I am lazy having to learn the different chord names when playing my music. I am going to leave the DGBE tuning, just wondering what others thought.

ukulelecowboy
02-08-2012, 05:51 AM
I play Southcoast linears (GCEA) on all my baritones. The low G adds some depth especially for Jazz standards. I do have one Baritone tuned gCEA (re-entrant) for certain applications.

Mike

ukulelecowboy
02-08-2012, 05:58 AM
Thanks for your replies. That was my thought too, that why get a baritone if you use the GCEA tuning but I have read of others doing that. I am lazy having to learn the different chord names when playing my music. I am going to leave the DGBE tuning, just wondering what others thought.

There are several excellent reasons to play a Baritone tuned GCEA (low G). First, the size affords many players who have larger hands to move around the fretboard and up and down the neck with much more freedom. Second, the greater depth of the instrument offers a very unique resonance and tone that is particularly excellent for Jazz standards. The wider string and fret spacing affords more flexibility with complex chord shapes and voicings. And finally, tuned GCEA it sounds absolutely nothing like a guitar. It has its own remarkable voice.

ukuhippo
02-08-2012, 07:20 AM
DGBE on my bari, high g on my soprano, low g on my tenor (on its way from HMS).

strumsilly
02-08-2012, 07:52 AM
I had GCEA low G on my baritone. Sounded great (like a tenor on steroids) but the tension was way to high. I like the DGBE tuning, but I'm not as proficient on it as on the other ukes.

Maybe a high D DGBE will sound good, but I never tested it.

The tension isn't too high if you use the correct string gauge.
The southcoast linear on my bari actually feel low tension tuned C.

mds725
02-08-2012, 08:09 AM
I agree that regular GCEA strings on a baritone might sound too much like a tenor (I even tried using a capo at the fifth fret of my DGBE baritone to see what a GCEA baritone might sound like. However, I bought GCEA string sets for baritone that are an octave lower than GCEA strings for tenor from a place called Guadalupe Custom Strings in Los Angeles. I haven't tried these strings yet, but my goal in getting them was to be able to play a baritone ukulele in GCEA tuning without losing that low baritone sound. I'm not sure if these strings are still available -- I've been unable to connect with Guadalupe's website. (here's the link, just in case: http://www.guadalupecustomstrings.com/ (http://www.guadalupecustomstrings.com/.com)

Hobo
02-08-2012, 08:15 AM
Glen Rose uses GCEA tuning on his baritone... and sounds awesome.
Listen and learn something: http://youtu.be/TE6dmFSTDSc

roxhum
02-08-2012, 10:36 AM
Oh yeah, now I remember. I am having enough trouble learning the fretboard of my gCEA ukulele so I was thinking I could pick melodies on my Baritone without having to learn another fretboard if I tuned it GCEA but I also don't want to loose the Baritone sound that I love.
So my question isn't how do you change the tunings and strings but peoples opinions of how it "sounds"?

osogris
02-08-2012, 10:57 AM
I just put a set of southcoast flat linear strings tuned to low Bb. It sounds pretty good and it's only one step down from c tuning.

I have a baritone tuned with Southcoast strings in the key of A (E-A-C#-F#), so pretty close to this and like it. I do end up changing keys on songs once in a while, though-songs in the key of E and A are now easier to play than G and C, whereas the opposite used to be the case. I also use a capo, but don't like it much-the intonation is fine, but something always sounds just a little muted.

Being two steps up from the key of G (D-G-B-E), you lose a little bass, but the bottom end is less muddled too. Give a little, get a little. Overall I like it, I just have to think a little harder when I am playing with someone else.

ichadwick
02-08-2012, 12:24 PM
Baris in both high and low D. Tried C tuning and found the strings too tight, too inflexible, and the sound too shrill.

roxhum
02-08-2012, 12:33 PM
Ooh shrill... not good.

Flyke
02-08-2012, 02:09 PM
My Pono Mahogany Baritone is tuned GCEA with southcoast linear non-wound strings and it sounds BEAUTIFUL. Dramatically better than the DGBE strings that were originally on it. The DGBE strings sounded really muddy and flat at the low end whereas the southcoast GCEA set are bright and punchy but still have a golden warm low end which really set it apart from my smaller ukes. Highly recommended!

My Harmony baritone is currently strung with re-entrant dGBE southcoast strings which is the fourth set of strings i've tried on it. Originally had Guadalupe octave down GCEA and sounded WAY too low. Then I tried DGBE and it sounded quite good. Then I tried Aquila High gCEA which was interesting - same notes as a standard uke but with a more mellow sound - definitley worth a go. And now the southcoast set which I think might be the ones I keep on it because the re-entrant tuning cuts out the low D which was a bit too low for that particular uke but being in G tuning, it gives a different sound to both my standard tuned ukes and my low G Pono.

Basically, i reckon that every uke has it's sweet spot. You just gotta try a few different sets of strings out to find it!

Cheers!

drbekken
02-08-2012, 08:34 PM
My baritone has the regular DGBE tuning. Works well for me, so I won't change anything.

TheCraftedCow
02-08-2012, 09:05 PM
The Aquila strings have the same tension for GCEA as for DGBE. To say a gCEA does not sound like a guitar is not completly accurate. It sounds like a guitar which is capoed at the 5th fret. Aquila also makes both tunings available for tenor. The size of the sound box (body) makes a difference in gCEA which no smaller uke can replicate.
There are those who have large hands and prefer baritone scale. Some have tenors made with a baritone neck.That shortens the overall length. The people from www.southcoastukuleles.com champion a different arrangement which sounds good in dGBe or gCEa . Take a #4 string to the #1 position and pull it up one full step.
Alternate tuning such as gCEG or dGBE are different from fCFG or cGCE. Some songs lend themselves better to one tuning over another. Drop the 3rd of the chord down a half step and now you are in a minor mode. The fretboard begins to make sense as you experiment with it. Just driving up and down I-5 is not seeing all of Oregon. Some people like to travel and see different things. Some don't. It is not right or wrong...just different. If you are a traveller, you can do it on any sized uke. Each of my same sized instruments tuned in a different way is a different journey. Gosh, some people even speak more than two different languages and keep 'em straight in their heads.

Rick Turner
01-04-2013, 07:40 AM
I think some folks are confusing octaves in this discussion.

You can tune a baritone as an "low octave uke" (Let's call it a louke) GCEA with the G being that of a guitar low E string fretted at the 3rd fret.

This puts the uke an octave below a tenor, concert, or soprano in modern "club" tuning. All your normal chord shapes work, but you're down a full octave. No transposition needed.

You can do this with the bottom four strings of a classical guitar set or tweak it and use a regular tension low E and A string for the bottom two (G and C) and then a high tension D and G for the top two (E and A).

We're starting to build Compass Rose "loukes" and they'll be out this year.

chris667
01-04-2013, 08:12 AM
I have a baritone tuned linear DGBE, and a tenor which is in re-entrant dGBE. Love them both, but for different things. When I bought my baritone, it was tuned gCEA; it just sounded like a big, harder to play uke so never got used. But the sad, mellow sound of DGBE was lovely and now it gets played every day. 8)

mds725
01-04-2013, 08:18 AM
I think some folks are confusing octaves in this discussion.

You can tune a baritone as an "low octave uke" (Let's call it a louke) GCEA with the G being that of a guitar low E string fretted at the 3rd fret.

This puts the uke an octave below a tenor, concert, or soprano in modern "club" tuning. All your normal chord shapes work, but you're down a full octave. No transposition needed.

You can do this with the bottom four strings of a classical guitar set or tweak it and use a regular tension low E and A string for the bottom two (G and C) and then a high tension D and G for the top two (E and A).

We're starting to build Compass Rose "loukes" and they'll be out this year.

Thanks for the clarification! I can hardly wait for my Compass Rose louke!


I have a baritone tuned linear DGBE, and a tenor which is in re-entrant dGBE. Love them both, but for different things. When I bought my baritone, it was tuned gCEA; it just sounded like a big, harder to play uke so never got used. But the sad, mellow sound of DGBE was lovely and now it gets played every day. 8)

I didn't realize one could string a tenor gDBE. Is there a specially made string set for that? How did you do it? I'd love to hear a sound sample comparing your gDBE tenor to your GDBE baritone.

drbekken
01-04-2013, 08:42 AM
Thanks for the clarification! I can hardly wait for my Compass Rose louke!



I didn't realize one could string a tenor gDBE. Is there a specially made string set for that? How did you do it? I'd love to hear a sound sample comparing your gDBE tenor to your GDBE baritone.

Try Southcoast Heavy Gauge. Wonderful for tenor dGBE!

SailQwest
01-04-2013, 09:36 AM
Try Southcoast Heavy Gauge. Wonderful for tenor dGBE!

We've been using Guadalupe Fibre Cores on my husband's "good" uke in this tuning for several years. They are lovely.

His next string change (sometime this week) will be to the Southcoast Heavy Gauge. I put Southcoasts on my latest concert and I'm very impressed with them.