PDA

View Full Version : New Laws for Instruments storage on Airplanes



papplehead
03-01-2012, 09:47 AM
http://www.bmi.com/news/entry/555905?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=March+2012+eBulletin&utm_content=March+2012+eBulletin+CID_5cb78b094927d 327f5c826cd43f5866a&utm_source=Email+marketing+software&utm_term=thumbnail

Not that ukuleles are the most difficult things to carry on an airplane, but having standardized rules should make things easier for us musicians.

Tell your worst ukulele/musical instrument airline story!

southcoastukes
03-01-2012, 10:15 AM
Just returned from flying Southwest.

Their answer was that each plane had a certain number, I think 2, of double overhead bins, and that guitar sized instruments and smaller were exceptions to the little "caary-on" template box at the check-in counters.

DaveVisi
03-01-2012, 10:23 AM
The part I don't like is the last sentence in the article;

the new FAA rules won’t go into effect until final regulations have been issued, which, according to the bill, will be “no later than two years after the date of enactment.”

Gwynedd
03-01-2012, 11:47 AM
Don't you think it's amazing that we can't solve these issues without Congress having to weigh in? It's incredible. What dolts we must be. But I agree it's better than being told your valuable instrument MUST ride in steerage and have the requisite three bounces by the boots of the luggage gorilla as it's crammed into the plane.

allanr
03-01-2012, 12:05 PM
Fortunately, as a hobby level musician, I just travel with my Martin S-O in a hard case. It fits easily in overhead storage, and has always been accepted. In a pinch it would probably survive in the passenger compartment. It's good enough to jam with other musicians, or perhaps even a gig a coffee house etc, but not so precious that it would be a disaster if something went wrong.

If I were a professional, gigging musician, I can only imagine how stressful it must be to fly these days. I'd probably invest in a really high-quality pressurized case that would survive any harsh environment, try to bring it on the plane anyway, and buy a really good insurance policy... Oh, and find out where I could locate a uke in whatever town I was flying into, "just in case".

mds725
03-01-2012, 12:23 PM
Don't you think it's amazing that we can't solve these issues without Congress having to weigh in? It's incredible. What dolts we must be. But I agree it's better than being told your valuable instrument MUST ride in steerage and have the requisite three bounces by the boots of the luggage gorilla as it's crammed into the plane.

It seems to me that the important part of this legislation is standardizing instrument carry-on rules for all carriers, so that someone traveling with a musical instrument doesn't have to know what the separate and possibly very different policies for each carrier are. I'm not sure how we individual "dolts" could have solved this problem of different standards for different carriers by ourselves.

Mouthy1
03-01-2012, 01:08 PM
A Steady backpack style uke case does very well on a plane and it fits Concert sizes. Brought my Mainland Cedar to Kauai...ironic isn't it?

itsme
03-01-2012, 01:17 PM
Pending issuance of final regulations, the amended law will, among other things, allow travelers to carry aboard any instrument or related gear that can be safely stored in the cabin, rather than risk it being damaged in the plane’s cargo hold or during baggage handling.
This does not guarantee that there will be room in the cabin for your instrument or that you will be allowed to bring it on board.

With more airlines charging for checked bags, more people are bringing their allowable carry-ons. With a full flight, the bins fill up fast, and if you are one of the last to board and the bins are full, guess what... you have to surrender your carry-ons. I have seen this happen many times on packed commuter flights.

Gwynedd
03-01-2012, 01:22 PM
I gotta say, I agree with most of the points you make. And true about the drinking water--my assistant's daughter is doing a stint in Armenia which is "civilization" compared to some places and water has to be delivered. We take a lot for granted in the US. As to rage, yes, being treated the way we are leads to it. I've been smashed, dumped on, knees crushed suddenly, had hypoxia from an overzealous shutdown of the recirculating air pack, had the overhead contents dumped on my head as I slept (luckily did not get a neck injury--did get a big hearty laugh from other passengers as I was awoken by a pile of books and mags landing square on my squash.)

ksiegel
03-02-2012, 03:28 AM
One of the last flights I did, I was carrying a ukulele in a hard case, and a computer backpack (with 3 laptops in it). I knew that the uke case wiould fit the overhead bin, and the computer bag would fit under the seat, but a flight attendant said that they might not fit, and I'd have to check one of the items at the door.

I looked at my wife (one of the computers was her work laptop), and said "Well, that's why I have TSA locks for the backpack."

She agreed - checking the ukulele was NOT an option.

As it turned out, I was right, and the flight attendant was impressed - both items fit perfectly where I'd intended them to go.

And from experience, I know that the Fluke tenor in a hard case will fit in ANY airplane's overhead bin. Even the little commuter flights.


-Kurt

ukuraleigh
03-02-2012, 03:35 AM
Does anyone know if this will standardize whether a musical instrument is classed as part of your carry-on limit? If the limit is 2 bags, can I have 2 carry-on and my uke, or just 1 + the uke?

I suspect the latter, but the former would rock!

hoosierhiver
03-02-2012, 04:28 AM
If you have a choice fly by an Asian carrier, they still treat you with respect.

Mandarb
03-02-2012, 05:06 AM
Thanks for the link. Sounds good.

coolkayaker1
03-02-2012, 05:09 AM
If you fly often, consider a RISA solid body "stick" uke.

Sporin
05-15-2012, 04:56 AM
Been reading all the airplane discussion on UU.... traveling with my Kala concert in a gig bag on Saturday and hoping I don't have a problem. I don't have a hardcase for it and hoped to just carry it on and put it in the overhead. I suppose if it breaks it breaks, it was a gift that I treasure but it's not a high-end uke so I'm trying to keep it in perspective.

UkueBass23
05-15-2012, 05:23 AM
I just came back from FLA where I traveled with my soprano in a hard case and it fit perfectly in the overhead bin. No one said anything to me about it. Am about to travel with it again next week. Not anticipating any issues.