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View Full Version : Can anyone help me with some history on this?



Antozzi48
03-06-2012, 01:34 AM
I've just inherited a soprano Kumalae uke that belonged my grandfather and would like to find out more about it. We dont know when he bought it, he certainly never played it because the bridge has come away. I cant wait to get it to a playable state but want it done properly instead of attacking it with superglue!

ukeeku
03-06-2012, 03:58 AM
I've just inherited a soprano Kumalae uke that belonged my grandfather and would like to find out more about it. We dont know when he bought it, he certainly never played it because the bridge has come away. I cant wait to get it to a playable state but want it done properly instead of attacking it with superglue!
A couple things. PLease have the bridge done by a pro, also please don't change out the wood tuing pegs. the fact that you still have all 4 is amazing. besidethat, all I know is that they are solid koa and that one is more thank likely made in the 20's. I hope others can fill in more.

hapauke
03-06-2012, 04:00 AM
Try this link:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CD8QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.roncookstudios.com%2FPDFs%2FS ister%2520M%2520Uke%2520Repair%2520Log.pdf&ei=SiVWT7nLJqmkiQLi6rDsBw&usg=AFQjCNHg5S7KUtjRtjcbK8rhIGSfOKC8WQ

Gadzukes!
03-06-2012, 04:08 AM
Kumalae was thought to be the most prolific Hawaiian uke maker from 1915 until his death in 1940. He showed his first uke at the Panama Pacific International Exhibition in San Francisco in 1915, where it earned him an award (which he subsequently used as the logo on his headstock). He helped usher in the first wave of popularity for the uke.

I agree, pay the money to have the uke fixed properly or don't fix it at all. A proper repair will pay for itself should you ever resell it. I bad one will lower the value of the uke (and likely sound bad to boot).

DaveVisi
03-06-2012, 04:34 AM
It shouldn't take much for someone to clamp and reglue the bridge. Shouldn't cost much for a repair tech. You'll pay more in clamps and the proper glue than if you just let them do it for you. You'll pay even more in grief and regret if it's done wrong.

RyanMFT
03-06-2012, 04:48 AM
What a great ukulele! I agree with the above comments. It is a really nice vintage ukulele and should be preserved. A luthier can re-glue that bridge no problem. It would be best to take it to someone who works with ukuleles. However, any experienced luthier can fix it.

Good advice on the tuners as well. Don't let anyone talk you into putting anything different on there. Those wood pegs work great and are correct for the ukulele. I love wood pegs and have them on three ukuleles of mine.

Looks like a style 2 ukulele....with an original case! Here is some info. on Kumalae himself....
http://www.ukulele.org/?Inductees:2002-2003:Jonah_Kumalae

It is hard to tell when it was made. Look inside with a small mirror and see if there is anything written on the underside of the top. Likely not but worth a try. I think it would date to the 20's/30's. A very nice ukulele, and other than the bridge being off, looks like excellent condition! Have it fixed and play it!

Antozzi48
03-06-2012, 05:16 AM
Thanks for all the advice guys, and don't worry i will get a luthier to do it. I have just had an email from Rob Collins (of Tinguitars) and he is happy to carry out the work. I'm just itching to string it up and play it, guess i'll have to rough it with my Tanglewood a little while longer!:)

kenikas
03-06-2012, 01:44 PM
Looks like a real gem you've got, I have a 1927 model 20 with the Ohia wood pegs and it's one of my favorites. I love your case, mine has the original canvas "trapdoor" case, but it's rather "aged". I agree with what everyone else has said, well woth the cost to get it professionally repaired, then put a set of Worths on it and play it in honor of your grandfather.