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Paul December
03-09-2012, 03:01 PM
I've purchased GCEA strings from Southcoast Uke and like them...
...but what else is out there? Aquila? Worth?

Paul December
03-09-2012, 03:45 PM
I see Aquila has GCEA baritone strings, but I can't figure out if they are hi or low G...
...I want Low G

JimmyRoberts
03-09-2012, 05:27 PM
They are hi-G. I couldn't find low-g baritone strings so I'm assuming we're talking about the same set.

The string gauges from 1st to 4th strings:
025 031 038 027

http://elderly.com/accessories/items/ANBP.htm

I don't have any experience with baritone ukuleles and don't want suggest something I've never used. I'm sure that some here will have suggestions.

TheCraftedCow
03-09-2012, 05:54 PM
I have 'em both ways...in fact, you can buy just a low G string, then you have both with only buying one full set. It is $3.50 with shipping included. I have a Giannini bari as gCEA, but slack it to fCFA. That is an open F tuning. barred at the 2nd fret it is G. For the Five string pack, it is $8.50 shipping included. These are Aquila sets and singles

Paul December
03-09-2012, 06:09 PM
I have 'em both ways...in fact, you can buy just a low G string, then you have both with only buying one full set. It is $3.50 with shipping included. I have a Giannini bari as gCEA, but slack it to fCFA. That is an open F tuning. barred at the 2nd fret it is G. For the Five string pack, it is $8.50 shipping included. These are Aquila sets and singles

Please clarify...
...Aquila sells single Low G for Baritone?

JimmyRoberts
03-09-2012, 06:38 PM
I'd be interested in a link to a baritone low-g string/set(Aquila)- for future reference. I plan on getting a baritone eventually.

I did find this:
http://elderly.com/accessories/items/ABUS-G.htm

Paul December
03-09-2012, 07:11 PM
I'd be interested in a link to a baritone low-g string/set(Aquila)- for future reference. I plan on getting a baritone eventually.

I did find this:
http://elderly.com/accessories/items/ABUS-G.htm

So you would need one of these for a Low G , plus are hi G set?

JimmyRoberts
03-09-2012, 07:15 PM
So you would need one of these for a Low G , plus are hi G set?

Yes. I'd like to see if that's the string TheCraftedCow mentioned.

TCK
03-09-2012, 08:05 PM
The Aquila set is High G as it is sold in the package. I could not stand the sound of them on the Baritone, switched to the Southcoast linears and stayed there.
You might get away with running one of Dirks re-entrant sets on a Bari as a High G, but like I said, I did not like the sound and was happy with the SOuthcoasts. To the best of my knowledge his is the only C tuning Low G set out there.

ichadwick
03-10-2012, 01:39 AM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.

In its native tuning, it's easier to play along with guitar arrangements, and to jam and other musicians who use guitars as their main instrument.

Why make it into merely a super-sized tenor?

JimmyRoberts
03-10-2012, 02:28 AM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.
String tension really isn't an issue with sets specifically made for C tuning: i.e. South Coast Ukes and Aquila. Why be limited to G tuning only? I plan on trying both and will most likely have a baritone for each tuning eventually.

Whichever tuning I use, I won't need to relearn anything.

ukulelecowboy
03-10-2012, 02:57 AM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.

In its native tuning, it's easier to play along with guitar arrangements, and to jam and other musicians who use guitars as their main instrument.

Why make it into merely a super-sized tenor?

Ian,

I perform regularly with Southcoast low g strings tuned GCEA. I only play baritone. The size of the instrument, neck width and fret spacing affords me much more flexibility when playing jazz chord voicings. I wanted the ukulele to have the tonal characteristics of the ukulele with the size sacrifice. We have almost 30 baritones in our collection. Only one is tuned DGBE.

strumsilly
03-10-2012, 03:24 AM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.

In its native tuning, it's easier to play along with guitar arrangements, and to jam and other musicians who use guitars as their main instrument.

Why make it into merely a super-sized tenor?
because we can!

Paul December
03-10-2012, 03:59 PM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.

In its native tuning, it's easier to play along with guitar arrangements, and to jam and other musicians who use guitars as their main instrument.


Why make it into merely a super-sized tenor?


Really?
How is it any different than people moving up (in size) from a concert to a tenor?
BTW - string tension is no greater with Southcoast strings.
Also, who wants to learn new chords?!

southcoastukes
03-10-2012, 04:32 PM
I've purchased GCEA strings from Southcoast and like them...
...but what else is out there? Aquila? Worth?

How about the other Southcoast set?

What other Southcoast set - the one that hasn't been released yet?

Yes, that one! The one with two wound strings!


Well, we're a few weeks away from release, but with the subject of this thread, I'm jumping the gun. We'll start work on "refreshing" the string site next week. When we finish and put up the new version, there'll be a few new sets, including a "C20 Linear String Set w/ Round Wound Basses". The name pretty much says it all. Our letter/number part of the name refers to the longest scale to use it on (in this case 20" standard Baritone scale) and the key you tune to on that scale (in this case key of C). It will have polished round wound 4th & 3rd strings.

Of course, all our strings are long enough for use on a number of scales, so, for instance, this set might also be called a "D17", since on a standard 17" Tenor scale, you tune it to key of D.

Once this happens, the Linear Ukulele set many of you are using on Baritones now will go away. Maybe "go away" is too strong a term; it will actually just get a new name: "C20 Linear String Set - No Wound Strings".

The two sets will have a very different character. We called the no-wound set "Linear Ukulele", because we felt that without wound strings, it gave the most "Ukulele" sound of any linear set-up. A lot of folks, however, like more of a "guitar" sound - maybe "Tenor Guitar" sound is a better word. Since we build classical Tenor Guitars, we appreciate that sound and why some people would like it.

Now there will be a choice.

southcoastukes
03-11-2012, 06:03 PM
I had wanted to get back to Ian's comments. First, let me say I love this guy. He took a hiatus from the forum for awhile, and I've been really glad to see him back. He's a fellow who has his own point of view and isn't bashful about it.

Anyone who has taken the time to put together all that old sheet music and offer it out as Ian has done is giving a lot to the ukulele community. If you haven't heard, send him a message.

I've got a ton of old sheet music myself. If I ever get any spare time, I'll see if there's anything there Ian doesn't already have and get some to him.

Just the same, we don't agree on the Baritone, and now I think I see why. Ian, if you've been trying to pull up standard G tuning Baritone strings to key of C, no wonder you don't like it. Count yourself lucky you still have a workable Baritone.

You shouldn't ever try to go more than about 1/2 step up or down from what a string set was designed for. Lower, and it's unplayable. Higher and not only is it uncomfortable, as you noted, but you're running the risk of damage.

As Jimmy said (much more concisely):


String tension really isn't an issue with sets specifically made for C tuning...Also, the remark about "super-size Tenor" assumes that a Tenor should be tuned to C. That wasn't it's original, or as you call it "native" tuning. The Tenor Ukulele was designed for a reentrant G (d' - g - b - e'). Not many people play it that way any more. The feeling was it was too low, but I'll leave Tenor tuning to another thread.

The fact is, that a Tenor is borderline small for a low G note. That note actually resonates better in the volume of a Baritone sized body.

Does that mean Linear C is the best tuning for a Baritone? Not neccesarily. You can go lower to B flat tuning or on some Baritones, A tuning. These access the volume of the body more so than C tuning. Linear G (that "native tuning") is actually a little too deep.

But if the Linear C tuning is your preferred set-up, then it will sound better on a Baritone that anywhere else.

By the way, Ian, feel free to correct any spelling or grammatical errors. I love spell check, and I used to actually like when Ian would be our resident grammarian (is that a word?). Good to see you back.

TCK
03-11-2012, 07:59 PM
C tuning with wound strings? I am on the hunt for another Baritone now. Can't wait to see how those sound

Ron
03-11-2012, 08:10 PM
I'm unclear why anyone wants to string a baritone in C rather than its native G tuning. The C tuning means much greater string tension, so stiffer, less flexible strings. The baritone's main advantage that I see (aside from the extra volume, tonal richness and fuller spectrum you get from the bigger body) is that it offers another key to play in without having to relearn anything.

In its native tuning, it's easier to play along with guitar arrangements, and to jam and other musicians who use guitars as their main instrument.

Why make it into merely a super-sized tenor?

To which i reply, Sir, why then string it like a little guitar? Have at ye!!

Magoosan
03-12-2012, 06:11 AM
Ian, I think it comes down to how you use the uke. If you're an instrumentalist, it doesn't matter much what key as long as you're getting the tonal characteristics you're after. I'm a singer and use the uke as accompaniment. With a 300+ song repertoire in C tuning, I really don't want to do all the transposing just to reap the benefits of the larger body size. I want everything in C tuning.

Bill