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Paul December
03-11-2012, 07:00 AM
A couple tenors I've gotten in the past had Aquila wound C strings (in addition to a wound low G string).
IMO it rang longer... just my imagination?
I've never seen Aquila sets sold that listed "wound C", do they sell them?
I know many dislike wound strings, I actually like them.

Scott S.
03-11-2012, 09:07 AM
I'm not sure if your looking specifically for Aquilas, but the Southcoast G650 linear flatwound set has both G and C wound. I just put a set on my LoPrinzi tenor last week and really like them. Not as loud as Aquilas, but real good string-to-string balance, and there's no string squeek whatsoever (because of the flatwounds).

WhenDogsSing
03-11-2012, 09:10 AM
I just bought 3 sets of Aquila tenors and they have a wound G and a wound C.

Kauai808
03-11-2012, 04:21 PM
Love the wound C string. Doesn't bark like the non wound C. If you ever find that your non wound C is always louder than your other strings, wound C is your answer.

Paul December
03-11-2012, 04:25 PM
Love the wound C string. Doesn't bark like the non wound C. If you ever find that your non wound C is always louder than your other strings, wound C is your answer.
So the wound C is quieter than the non-wound? I would have thought the opposite.

southcoastukes
03-11-2012, 04:32 PM
I can understand people who don't like wound strings. What I can't understand is why anyone who likes wound strings would only have a wound 4th.

We make at least a half dozen wound sets, and all have wound 3rds. Single wound 4th sets exist for only one reason - whoever is selling them is trying to put together a cheap set

A non-wound 3rd will always be a relatively "dead" string compared to the thinner 1st & 2nd strings. Even more so compared to the bright tone and long sustain of a wound 4th. The 4-3 transition is awful. Even guitar sets are now more frequently offered with wound 3rds, and with 6 strings, that bad transition is not as noticeable as when you have only 4 strings.

There is one possible scenario for a single wound set. That would be a relatively heavy gauge high reentrant set where the single wound string is the 3rd string. For a linear tuning, however, better to go double wound or no-wound.

Paul December
03-11-2012, 04:45 PM
I can understand people who don't like wound strings. What I can't understand is why anyone who likes wound strings would only have a wound 4th.

We make at least a half dozen wound sets, and all have wound 3rds. Single wound 4th sets exist for only one reason - whoever is selling them is trying to put together a cheap set

A non-wound 3rd will always be a relatively "dead" string compared to the thinner 1st & 2nd strings. Even more so compared to the bright tone and long sustain of a wound 4th. The 4-3 transition is awful. Even guitar sets are now more frequently offered with wound 3rds, and with 6 strings, the bad tranisition is not as noticeable as when you have only 4 strings.

There is one possible scenario for a single wound set. That would be a relatively heavy gauge high reentrant set where the single wound string is the 3rd string. For a linear tuning, however, better to go double wound or no-wound.

:) PM sent ... I need strings! (can't figure out what set to order :( )

southcoastukes
03-11-2012, 05:02 PM
Replied.

We make three sets that would work. Any set for 4ths tuning with the name "G650" will give Linear C tuning on your 17" Tenor Uke scale.

The set w/ Round Wound basses is the more conventional. Very durable Round Wound polished strings (4 & 3) for less squeak.

There are two flat wound sets as well. Flat wound strings will have ball ends, and virtually no finger squeak. The set with Flat Wound Basses has two FW (4 & 3) w/ conventional trebles. The "Classical Metal" set has 3 FW (4-3-2) with a very thin steel string 1st.

The FW Bass set has a nice mellow tone - even a little softer than the Round Wounds. The CM set is more guitar-like with a bright finish on the 1st string.

mds725
03-11-2012, 06:45 PM
I have to agree with Dirk. My first tenor came with a set of Aquila strings with a wound low G, and the G overwhelmed the other strings. I solved that problem by swapping the Aquilas for Worths, with an unwound low G. It never occurred to me that I might like the sound of a wound low G more if it was accompanied by a would C string. I'll have to try that sometime!

Kanaka916
03-11-2012, 08:59 PM
Ko'olau strings have wound G and C in their sets. I think Hilo has one or two string sets with the 3rd and 4th being wounds. I have a set of Alohi and Mahana which I haven't tried (yet). I'm favoring the Southcoast Mediums on the HF-3 and will in all likelihood be switching to Southcoast G650 w/flat wounds. Much Mahalos to Dirk for all the info he has contributed to the forums.

808boy
03-11-2012, 09:21 PM
Aloha,
+1 on the Southcoast G650's. Put them on my Mele Double Puka Koa Tenor(per Danny's(Kanaka916) suggestion) and never thought of anything else for it. Found the perfect string set for it. Total balance, nice sustain and note seperation.
Mahalo to Bruddah Danny, and Dirk..............................BO.............. ....................

bynapkinart
03-12-2012, 05:07 AM
I just swapped out the Low G Worths on my Pono for Ko'olau Golds with a wound C, and I'm very impressed. I haven't played them long enough to give a real opinion, but the strings definitely sound nicer on the Pono to my ears than the Worths did (and the worths sounded very nice!)...perhaps a little bit more balanced between the strings and clearer overall. They certainly feel nice! The wound C takes some getting used to, the squeaking is something I'm used to on my guitars but to have one string out of four squeak with fingering changes is a little strange. Still, it has a great sound to it, and I agree with some other posters that it tends to overpower a little less and seems to have a brighter, more percussive tone than an unwound C.

DaveVisi
03-12-2012, 05:43 AM
Aloha,
+1 on the Southcoast G650's. Put them on my Mele Double Puka Koa Tenor(per Danny's(Kanaka916) suggestion) and never thought of anything else for it. Found the perfect string set for it. Total balance, nice sustain and note seperation.
Mahalo to Bruddah Danny, and Dirk..............................BO.............. ....................
Here's another vote for Southcoast G650's I too was wondering about the wound C, but now that I read the explanation and tried it for myself, it makes perfect sense.

Kauai808
03-14-2012, 11:23 AM
So the wound C is quieter than the non-wound? I would have thought the opposite.

I find the wound c to be warmer. I'm not sure that the wound string is quieter as much as it just blends with the other strings a little better for me. Trust me, I was skeptical of wound strings too. Then one day my store that I buy strings at only had a wound C aquila set. My uke sounded so balanced. I have not gone back to non-wound since.

DaveVisi
03-14-2012, 11:47 AM
I find the wound c to be warmer. I'm not sure that the wound string is quieter as much as it just blends with the other strings a little better for me. Trust me, I was skeptical of wound strings too. Then one day my store that I buy strings at only had a wound C aquila set. My uke sounded so balanced. I have not gone back to non-wound since.

That's what I found too. Southcoast says since the plain C is so thick compared to the others, it's hard to balance it out, especially against an even lower wound G. Winding them both evens things out nicely. Brighter or warmer, whatever your case is, it just flows better across all four strings.

alanjang
04-09-2012, 10:29 AM
I just got back from the Big Island and of course, had to stop by Hilo Guitars. On the wall (along with some beautiful Kanile'as) was a custom that I didn't recognize. Beautiful koa and the headstock had a big "V" on it. I asked to play it and while the uke itself was good, the balance and sustain in the strings is what impressed me. I took a closer look and it was a set of high G Aquilas with a wound C. I bought a set at the store and can't wait to try them on one of my tenors.