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WOBster
03-26-2012, 07:06 AM
Simple question...Can one play low-g instrument using tab for regular high-g tuning or does the octave difference make it sound somehow incorrect? I have a low-g instrument (actually a Baritone tuned to low-g) on its way to me and while it seems like it would be the same... I thought I would benefit from your experience... I may tune it to DGBE but want to at least try the low-g tuning!
Thanks!

janeray1940
03-26-2012, 07:13 AM
If you mean using tab to play melody - generally it won't work; if written for reentrant tuning the note on the tab for the G string will be an octave too low when you play it on your low-G uke.

If you mean strumming chords - usually it works, especially in a group. I've found that on a low G uke sometimes a different inversion of a chord sounds better than what is written on a reentrant chord chart.

Ukuleleblues
03-26-2012, 07:51 AM
The fingering for Chords will be the same. If you are picking a melody it might sound funny since, even though the notes are identical, the Low G is an octave higher.

SailingUke
03-26-2012, 08:20 AM
The fingering for Chords will be the same. If you are picking a melody it might sound funny since, even though the notes are identical, the Low G is an octave higher.

higher ?, I thought it was low g.

snunez
03-26-2012, 08:21 AM
he meant lower

Kimosabe
03-26-2012, 10:50 AM
Sometimes you can play a high g arrangement on a low g uke. Try it. Does it sound good? If yes, it works. if no,

the third fret on the 2nd string is the open high g. Trying playing that when called for. Any tabs for the high g can be found on the 2nd string. sometimes the fingering is actually easier.

Best is to have two ukes, one for high and one for low.

Then you'll need ukes for different strings and different tunings.

I've got metal classical strings on my tenor in low g. Cuarto strings on my bari( low 4th and low first) High g on my Vita and a B tuning on my concert with a high A. How do like them apples?

Different tunings are the excuses we make for buying new ukes, but they also come in handy for other types of music and different vocal ranges and for bringing out the quality of different instruments.

Check out Southcoast strings for a variety of wonderful flavors.

WOBster
03-26-2012, 06:39 PM
Thanks for all the input! Is tab for low-g readily found?
I'm off to look but suggestions always welcome.

itsme
03-26-2012, 07:16 PM
Sometimes you can play a high g arrangement on a low g uke. Try it. Does it sound good? If yes, it works. if no,

the third fret on the 2nd string is the open high g. Trying playing that when called for. Any tabs for the high g can be found on the 2nd string. sometimes the fingering is actually easier.

Best is to have two ukes, one for high and one for low.
I've found some arrangements that work well in both, but more often than not they just don't sound the same.

I've used the 2nd string thing as well, but you are right that having dedicated high/low G ukes is the best solution. :)

Uke Whisperer
03-27-2012, 12:51 AM
I've read that some people use the low G as a base string for playing country or other (?) genre. Is that like picking the string before a strum, playing that string first in a broken chord/arpaggio or what?

stevepetergal
03-27-2012, 03:35 AM
I play high G arrangements on my low G instrument all the time. I sometimes find myself using an alternate string when melody calls for the first string, (which isn't really that often). It's not at all complicated, so melody is not a big problem. In fact, it's been a great learning tool for me. Plus, you can sometimes find a place where those extra notes help you out. There's nothing bad about having a little wider range

I say give it a try, by all means.