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View Full Version : Auwe someone stole uke from the vendors area...looking for a pikake koaloha



MGM
03-31-2012, 04:13 AM
So sad to hear that Eileen who has the Kanikapila company and runs the great Wine Country Ukulele festival in Napa had a pikake soprano taken from her booth yesterday...Shame on whoever the culprit is....maybe they will get nonbuyers remorse and it will reappear...If not the God's of Pele will reign upon them/..

Gadzukes!
03-31-2012, 04:18 AM
Does she have any pictures of it? If so, post them and everyone on UU can keep an eye out for it showing up for sale.

Elainede
04-02-2012, 07:49 PM
Hey there, Elaine, here. I don't have any pictures of the actual uke that was stolen, but here's a similar one from the KoAloha website: 35842

The general consensus seemed to be that it's probably sitting in some pawn shop in Reno. Looks like I should have gone to the Hayward Festival instead......

mds725
04-02-2012, 09:11 PM
That's awful that someone would (or even could) steal an ukulele from an ukulele festival. Given the number of pawn shops in Reno, one would think that the Reno Police would be accustomed to stolen property showing up at pawn shops and would have a system in place to alert area pawn shops that someone may come in with stolen property.

His Sinfulness
04-02-2012, 10:23 PM
My experience is limited to one state in the US but from what I've seen, law enforcement unfortunately doesn't generally have the time or manpower to work with pawn shops that closely, and there are plenty of pawn shop owners who see cops as an impediment to business. The only things we ever really looked into in pawn shops were the handguns.

PoiDog
04-03-2012, 04:52 AM
Okay, now that is just not cool at all.

Gotta hope for some sort of karmic revenge, or maybe that the bad bachi will get them later.

chrimess
04-03-2012, 04:57 AM
that is so shameful, we have always prided ourselves to be an honourable community, clearly a case for Reno 911(sorry).

bazmaz
04-03-2012, 05:57 AM
That stinks!

Elainede
04-04-2012, 11:28 AM
This has been reported to the Sparks police, case # 12SP02904. We'll see what happens. (Security at the Nugget was pretty disinterested.)

A number of people are keeping an eye out on CraigsList and eBay. Besides being a KoALoha soprano pikake, it had a date stamp on the label in the sound hole: August 2011. The more eyes the better. Thank you.

Frankly, I'm still a little shocked and very disappointed that the festival organizers didn't do anything (nada...nothing) to recover this the minute they heard it had been stolen, which was within minutes of the fact. A general announcement at the very least might have increased the chances of recovering it significantly and catching the culprit. It was the only KoAloha pikake at the festival......

Thanks, however, go out to everyone else for their concern and help.

I'll keep you posted.

Elaine

ramone
04-04-2012, 11:54 AM
sorry to hear about this, I hope you can get it back.

Plainsong
04-04-2012, 04:25 PM
Since the thief isn't going to speak up, I think the event organizers should. People need to remember their disinterest before booking the trip next year.

Uke Whisperer
04-05-2012, 01:15 AM
Would not there be security cameras at such an event? I'd think that facility would have a bunch!

Toucan Mango
04-05-2012, 04:28 AM
Sorry to hear some one got sticky fingers at your booth Elaine, I will keep an eye out for it as well.

Trinimon
04-05-2012, 05:31 AM
That's horrible! I hope karma get's them good! You'd figure uke players were better than that but I guess there are the odd bad seed amongst us. :(

UKEON TERRITORY
04-05-2012, 09:08 AM
A serial number in the original post might be of some use .

King FarUke
04-05-2012, 09:37 AM
This brings up a good point. One problem with recovering stolen property is identification. Just because a KoAloha shows up in a pawn shop or is found elsewhere does not mean you would get the item returned. Everyone should keep track of serial numbers and any other identifying marks on your instruments that could say with certainty that the item is yours - photgraphs of any unique features that help in identification would be a plus. It may not be a bad idea to mark the item with your initials in an area hidden from view. Without that, the police may not release a piece of property to you just because you claim it is yours but have no further proof.

hoosierhiver
04-05-2012, 10:07 AM
That's a shame, at most of the ukulele festivals that I've attended the organisers have a good staff of volenteers around and usually bend over backwards to help out the vendors.

Gwynedd
04-05-2012, 12:55 PM
If this info is of any help, there seems to be a (new) class of people who go to festivals and liberate items that are of value in resale to a particular community. Last year, someone went to a large wool and fiber festival (for knitters, weavers and spinners) and stole a popular spinning wheel out of a vendor booth. It then turned up on a local Craigslist or some other list frequented by people with SAS (spinning wheel acquisition syndrome....)

The best bet is to scan CL or online communities where a uke might be sold for close to its true value (because these people are greedy and not just going to a pawn shop) and also put the word out to any forums like this.

The spinning wheel was sussed out by someone who realized the re-seller was someone who typically attended festivals and had their own business selling similar items. Since there was a photo of the item, people were able to ID it as the stolen item. Sadly, as it went over state lines, the authorities were unwilling to take any notice, even though it was over the limit for petty larceny.

UKEON TERRITORY
04-05-2012, 12:59 PM
This brings up a good point. One problem with recovering stolen property is identification. Just because a KoAloha shows up in a pawn shop or is found elsewhere does not mean you would get the item returned. Everyone should keep track of serial numbers and any other identifying marks on your instruments that could say with certainty that the item is yours - photgraphs of any unique features that help in identification would be a plus. It may not be a bad idea to mark the item with your initials in an area hidden from view. Without that, the police may not release a piece of property to you just because you claim it is yours but have no further proof.


ANY vendor of any sort at any show of thier product that doesn't have an accurate inventory list that includes serial numbers and photos of each piece is wide open for demise . Ukers are still made up of humans . Unfortuantely the uke alone is not an identiying mark of a quality human .

Sorry to hear and read of your loss . ALWAYS PROTECT YOURSELF !

Plainsong
04-05-2012, 02:01 PM
I think what they're trying to say is that Koalohas don't come with any serial numbers to record.

UKEON TERRITORY
04-05-2012, 02:06 PM
I think what they're trying to say is that Koalohas don't come with any serial numbers to record.

Yet another reason I'm not fond of the Koaloha ukes . That's good info though .

mds725
04-05-2012, 05:39 PM
The point about security cameras is a good one. I thought places like hotels in Nevada with casinos have security cameras everywhere, although the cameras may be more concentrated in the casinos themselves. As for the indifference of the venue, I'd recommend that this community strongly pressure the organizers of the Reno festival to (i) select a different venue next year, preferably a big competitor of this year's venue, and to be vocal about why and (ii) require the venue they select to place working security cameras at least in the vendor area, but preferably everywhere (to reduce the likelihood of the theft of a privately owned ukulele). If the organizers themselves were indifferent, then I'd recommend that this community strongly pressure this year's vendors and performers to threaten to boycott next year's festival unless vendor security is made a top priority.

Gwynedd
04-06-2012, 12:43 AM
I would respectfully disagree with some of your points (not because you are wrong, but to add some ideas....)

1. The venue cannot provide security for conventions beyond general security for the hotel/casino site. It would be prohibitively expensive to hold a convention or show if you had to pay for extra guards at the door and circulating through the show.
2. It would be hard to tell if someone owned the uke and was taking it away unless a guard or booth attendant was watching directly.
3. Video cams only give you evidence after the fact, but are useful for prosecution. And they are not that expensive, so the exhibitor can consider if they want to add video capability to their booth.
4. The thefts we've seen at (non-ukulele) shows are often done by other vendors or ticket buying show attendees, who realize the worth of a speciality item, choose it based on specific knowledge and then vend it specifically where they know the item is valued; ie not your garden-variety thief but more like an art-heist, where the value of the item and the market for the item are well known to the crook. So security would have a hard time sorting the crooked show attendee from the legitimate ones.

Therefore, caveat exhibitor. If you have valuable instruments, you must have a minimum of booth attendants who can handle the traffic and also watch the stock, or put some kind of leash lock on valuable instruments and only show them (like a jewelry store) to one person at a time, with someone standing there over them. And during breaks, either lock up the stock or have someone on duty and never leave the booth unattended. And record all serial numbers and photograph stock coming to the show.

ksiegel
04-06-2012, 06:34 AM
One reason that I buy my spinning products new and from authorized dealers only.
I've only purchase one ukulele used, and that was from a UU member, and the one I bought on eBay was directly from the importer.

Regarding both musical instruments AND spinning wheels, service and support are very important to me.

I've never bought anything from Craigslist - I find it too difficult to read, anyway.


If this info is of any help, there seems to be a (new) class of people who go to festivals and liberate items that are of value in resale to a particular community. Last year, someone went to a large wool and fiber festival (for knitters, weavers and spinners) and stole a popular spinning wheel out of a vendor booth. It then turned up on a local Craigslist or some other list frequented by people with SAS (spinning wheel acquisition syndrome....)

The best bet is to scan CL or online communities where a uke might be sold for close to its true value (because these people are greedy and not just going to a pawn shop) and also put the word out to any forums like this.

The spinning wheel was sussed out by someone who realized the re-seller was someone who typically attended festivals and had their own business selling similar items. Since there was a photo of the item, people were able to ID it as the stolen item. Sadly, as it went over state lines, the authorities were unwilling to take any notice, even though it was over the limit for petty larceny.

ksiegel
04-06-2012, 06:44 AM
The point about security cameras is a good one. I thought places like hotels in Nevada with casinos have security cameras everywhere, although the cameras may be more concentrated in the casinos themselves. As for the indifference of the venue, I'd recommend that this community strongly pressure the organizers of the Reno festival to (i) select a different venue next year, preferably a big competitor of this year's venue, and to be vocal about why and (ii) require the venue they select to place working security cameras at least in the vendor area, but preferably everywhere (to reduce the likelihood of the theft of a privately owned ukulele). If the organizers themselves were indifferent, then I'd recommend that this community strongly pressure this year's vendors and performers to threaten to boycott next year's festival unless vendor security is made a top priority.

A few years back, I had a video projector stolen from a meeting room at a local hotel/convention center. The doors to the room were locked - from the public areas, a key was required for entry. From the back-of-house, we think keys were required. The hotel did not have any security cameras in the back-of-house area.

And although our contract with the hotel took all liability for theft from the meeting rooms from the property, and put it square on the shoulders of the exhibitors (us), the hotel replaced the projector with a newer one.
The next year, when we returned, the hotel manager walked us through the b-o-h area, showed off the new security cameras and locks on the doors, and explained that the property theft was what finally got the Corporate bean counters to spring for the upgraded security the hotel management had been asking for over a 4-year period.

I'm not saying that the place in Reno bears no responsibility for their indifference - far from it - but they may not have had security measures in place in non-gambling locations. The difference is, in my situation, the property management bent over backwards to fix the problem, and ensure it wouldn't be repeated. In Reno, they are apparently ass-hats and dip-twads.


-Kurt

OldePhart
04-06-2012, 07:12 AM
I think what they're trying to say is that Koalohas don't come with any serial numbers to record.

That's a good point. At least they have distinctive grain patterns. Even ukes made from adjacent slices of the same Koa log can probably be identified even by a non-specialist if given a good closeup of the front with a millimeter-graduated ruler sitting directly on the wood to provide precise scale. Instruments with very fine-grained wood, or that have opaque finishes, would be more difficult if not impossible to ID by photo.

Such a photo might not be enough to stand up in a criminal court but would probably serve to get the instrument back if it was located in a pawn shop or on Craig's list.

John