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Darcado
04-07-2012, 08:53 AM
The titles says it all that is my aim simply hear a song and comfortablly transposing it naturally to the ukulele without much thought as iff the ukulele is a body part . ( or am i asking too much ?) cause i think everyone would want to reach that level haha but please share on tips and such that will help to develop this skill .
Thank you very much ^^

Lori
04-07-2012, 09:25 AM
Jim D'Ville does workshops and has DVD/ video lessons. He is very helpful. I recommend him, especially for beginners.
http://www.playukulelebyear.com/

–Lori

itsme
04-07-2012, 10:30 AM
In order to play by ear and figure out songs, you need to be familiar with some basic chord progressions. Uncle Rod's Boot Camp can help with that. See the links in his sig:

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?63061-bad-links-to-Uncle-Rod-s-Boot-Camp-repaired

CoLmes
04-07-2012, 10:53 AM
UU+ has a seminar on this very topic ;-)

weerpool
04-07-2012, 01:24 PM
unfortunately its some kind of a talent, you either have it or you dontt
The titles says it all that is my aim simply hear a song and comfortablly transposing it naturally to the ukulele without much thought as iff the ukulele is a body part . ( or am i asking too much ?) cause i think everyone would want to reach that level haha but please share on tips and such that will help to develop this skill .
Thank you very much ^^

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
04-07-2012, 01:31 PM
unfortunately its some kind of a talent, you either have it or you dontt

I disagree. Anyone can learn to do it, but it may take a while. (Took me five or six years. Heh.)

Ukulele JJ
04-08-2012, 02:27 AM
unfortunately its some kind of a talent, you either have it or you dontt

I disagree as well.

Perfect pitch--the ability to hear a note or chord and say, "That's a C#" or whatever--is probably a talent. And a rare one too.

But nearly anyone can develop and hone their relative pitch--the ability to hear two notes and say, "That's a minor third", or to hear a chord progression and say, "That's a 1 to the 6 minor".

Like anything else, it requires practice. You get better at picking out things by ear by doing a whole lot of trying to pick things out by ear.

JJ

stevepetergal
04-08-2012, 02:30 AM
The most important tip is 10,000 hours.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
04-08-2012, 08:08 AM
Oh, I commented on a comment, but forgot to give you a tip. Here's two:

(1) Learn to play LOTS of songs---preferably in different keys and at different tempos. Every new chord progression or melody you play goes into your brain's musical memory. It'll go deeper if you learn to play the song by heart. When I first began to recognize notes and chords correctly, it was because I'd been playing many of them myself in other contexts.

(2) Play with others. Find friends who'll play music with you. It's best if your group has a few different instruments. As you play with others, your musical brain will begin to sort out individual notes and chords from the group's sound---a key skill for learning music by ear.

Oh, and one more:

(3) Spend plenty of time playing for fun. Developing your musical ability is a life-long journey. Be sure to enjoy the trip.

SCDavidKim
04-09-2012, 02:10 AM
i think its all about experience. once you play lots of songs, youll remember what chords sound like and then after hearing a song, youll know which chords will sound best on the note.
Also, when youre listening to a song, pick the base notes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nEpr9kVKpk&context=C4b5eb31ADvjVQa1PpcFN42KDQ-ULJfxZ9hUIXCcRyikVlTuUpTos= This guy explains it better. skip to 1:00

It also helps to know a little bit of musical theory. About scales. It helps a lot as each fret is a half step.

Lalz
04-09-2012, 03:01 AM
+ 1 on Jim D'Ville's website and DVDs, they're brilliant and his method is applicable in lots of different ways.

My two cents plus things I've learned through his method: listen to a lot of music. But listen actively, paying attention to transitions, how notes work together and what role each instrument plays in the song sequentially and in "parallel", i.e. in connection to the other instruments. You don't even have to be playing along doing this, the idea is to internalise how songs work so that their ins and outs come naturally.
Experiment with playing various chord transitions - even random ones - just to get a sense of how they feel musically, then memorise them. They'll come in handy.
Then when you want to play a song you already heard many times, here's a trick: before and while learning to play a song, try just singing for yourself the parts you want to play. For me it makes it easier to transpose when I do that because it takes those parts out of the context of the recorded song and I can hear what note is supposed to come next regardless of the key. Think of the notes as I's, IV's etc instead of C, F etc so that you can play them in any key afterwards.
If you're playing songs you've never heard before during a jam session, first try to figure out what key people are playing in (generally it's the first note of a barre), listen for a little while to get the structure of the song, and then apply what you've learned previously about how notes relate to each other and common chord transitions. And if some people play the same instrument as you, watch their fingers very closely hehe :)

mm stan
04-09-2012, 08:48 AM
there are no shortcuts..time and practice is what you need..you need to familiar yourself with the sounds, chords
and notes.. and pay attention...only time does that..and I'd play on a larger uke so you can hear it better..more volume
play an hour after you wake up, you mind is clear and fresh...you will be suprised what a difference it makes..
Good Luck..