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View Full Version : Mya-Moe owners - What makes your Mya-Moe so "playable"?



mds725
04-23-2012, 10:29 AM
I recently became the very proud and happy owner of a Mya-Moe myrtle tenor tradition (#635 (http://www.myamoeukuleles.com/uketracker.php?trackingNumber=635&submit=Track)), and I have a myrtle baritone classic (#669 (http://www.myamoeukuleles.com/uketracker.php?trackingNumber=669&submit=Track)) being built. I already own a 2010 Kamaka tenor and a 2010 KoAloha tenor, and I love them both, but I noticed right away that there was something about my Mya-Moe tenor that made it lots of fun to play. I don't know if it's the radiused fretboard, the feel of the strings, something about the weight of the instrument or the way the instrument is balanced that makes it easier to hold, or maybe just that I like the sound of it so much that I'm just enjoying listening to it when I play. I just know that I love the feel of it in my hands when I play it.

So my questions to Mya-Moe owners, or anyone who's had the chance to play a Mya-Moe ukulele: What does "playability" mean to you, and what is it you think makes your Mya-Moe so much fun to play?

decaturcomp
04-23-2012, 10:41 AM
I can't wait to be able to answer this question. I just selected the wood for my curly maple myrtle tadition tenor #775 today. I've been waiting but not too patiently. They're great folks to work with, I'll say that much.

Patrick Madsen
04-23-2012, 11:45 AM
For me, it's the radiused fretboard and low action. It is comfortable for sure. Took a little getting used to the lightness and smaller tenor body. The build I bought is #461. Was blessed to find it used, if 6mos old in new condition is considered used. I think the great energy MM has goes into the uke and radiates out has something to do with the playability also.

mm stan
04-23-2012, 02:52 PM
Yes it's the low action and radiused neck also get the 1 3/8" wide nut and great attention to the fretboard and frets...could go for a thinner neck though....

janeray1940
04-23-2012, 03:08 PM
Yes it's the low action and radiused neck also get the 1 3/8" wide nut and great attention to the fretboard and frets...could go for a thinner neck though....

Aloha Stan, so the MM neck is on the thick side? Good to know... I didn't realize you had one. Can you tell me how it compares to a Kamaka? Mahalo!

Hippie Dribble
04-23-2012, 03:13 PM
Aloha Stan, so the MM neck is on the thick side? Good to know... I didn't realize you had one. Can you tell me how it compares to a Kamaka? Mahalo!

I have to disagree with this. I don't believe they are thick at all, quite the opposite, at least in comparison to other ukes I've played. The neck profiles of MM's are slim and well suited to those of us with smaller hands.

mm stan
04-23-2012, 03:53 PM
Aloha Miss M and Bruddah J,
I am used to thin fast necks maybe..on my koa MM it is just on the slightly thicker than my new kamaka...just saying... ha ha no gang up on me...
I prefer necks like on old martins and some old kamakas, thin and fast...Mya Moes are totally different to kamakas...new kamakas are generally known
for their rich sound and with new strings they have some resonation and substain...Mya Moes even with the slightly thicker neck to me, LOL) but are
more finely made and more attention to detail and easier to play...with the radiused fretboard and attention to it's and the frets.. It has
a brighter crisper tone with a bell like chime...better note separation... the kamaka plays effortlessly, however to me, I feel the Mya
Moe plays easier...but for some reason for playing....my choice is the kamaka.....maybe the more traditional ukulele sound for me...however
both are really good ukuleles but just totally different animals...in the end, It's personal perference, get both...I'm baseing this on my koa MM soprano
and my Kamaka koa soprano...of course it is my personal opinion only..
PS...Sorry Bruddah Eugene, I didn't really expain clearly..and having maybe a different perspective than you...no disrespect meant...afta all you my friend...:)

blue_knight_usa
04-23-2012, 04:00 PM
I have to agree with Patrick, my neck is not thick at all compared to my Pono (well it was mine, just sold it). The low action and radiused fretboard are fantastic. It's been the easiest uke to do bar chords and the action is superb. I have a resonator and the sustain is fantasic and no dead notes up the fretboard like you find on some ukes where the note does not ring but rather just makes a sound and dies quickly. Build incredible strong with the reinforced neck and you always have a one of a kind hand crafted non-production uke that will last you a life time.

Definitely the easiest of my ukes to play. For my every day tenor playing I mainly play my Kanilea and my Collings but I do play this one for any blues tunes and glass slide works awesome on the resonator (which happens to be a National Reso Cone) so the slide sound rings nice and clear.

janeray1940
04-23-2012, 04:01 PM
Aloha Miss M and Bruddah J,
I am used to thin fast necks maybe..on my koa MM it is just on the slightly thicker than my new kamaka...just saying... ha ha no gang up on me...
I prefer necks like on old martins and some old kamakas, thin and fast...Mya Moes are totally different to kamakas...new kamakas are generally known
for their rich sound and with new strings they have some resonation and substain...Mya Moes even with the slightly thicker neck9to me, LOL) but are
more finely made and more attention to detail and easier to play...with the radiused fretboard and attention to it's and the frets.. It has
a brighter crisper tone with a bell like chime...better note separation... the kamaka plays effortlessly, however to me, I feel the Mya
Moe is easier...but for some reason for playing....my choice is the kamaka.....maybe the more traditional ukulele sound for me...however
both are really good ukuleles but just totally different animals...in the end, It's personal perference, get both...I'm baseing this on my koa MM soprano
and my Kamaka koa soprano...of course it is my personal opinion only..
PS...Sorry Bruddah Eugene, I didn't really expain clearly..and having maybe a different perspective than you...no disrespect meant...afta all you my friend...:)

Many thanks Stan, this comparison is really helpful. I had no idea you had a koa MM soprano... I'm considering a MM super soprano and am torn between koa and mango at this point. (No, "one of each" isn't an option :))

Hippie Dribble
04-23-2012, 04:14 PM
Aloha Miss M and Bruddah J,
I am used to thin fast necks maybe..on my koa MM it is just on the slightly thicker than my new kamaka...just saying... ha ha no gang up on me...
I prefer necks like on old martins and some old kamakas, thin and fast...Mya Moes are totally different to kamakas...new kamakas are generally known
for their rich sound and with new strings they have some resonation and substain...Mya Moes even with the slightly thicker neck to me, LOL) but are
more finely made and more attention to detail and easier to play...with the radiused fretboard and attention to it's and the frets.. It has
a brighter crisper tone with a bell like chime...better note separation... the kamaka plays effortlessly, however to me, I feel the Mya
Moe plays easier...but for some reason for playing....my choice is the kamaka.....maybe the more traditional ukulele sound for me...however
both are really good ukuleles but just totally different animals...in the end, It's personal perference, get both...I'm baseing this on my koa MM soprano
and my Kamaka koa soprano...of course it is my personal opinion only..
PS...Sorry Bruddah Eugene, I didn't really expain clearly..and having maybe a different perspective than you...no disrespect meant...afta all you my friend...:)
right...it's stacks on the mill...Stan at da bottom!!!!

Na mate, no ganging up, just a different perspective. i know what you mean re the vintage ukes being VERY slimlined and yeah, the ones I've owned all have been. Especially the old regal that I still have...that is super slim and very fast...to fast for me he he

But I just had to chime in there because...well...I've owned 10 of em and in comparison with all the other modern built ukes I've played they are very slim. Interestingly though, that neck on the koa MM of yours is a bit different in feel for sure...like, it's broader than my mango MM soprano. It isn't anywhere near as tapered (more like a "U" than a "V" if you're with me), and so it definitely presses in harder into the cup between your thumb and forefinger. But that is the only one I've felt like that, all the rest have been much the same in profile.

also, the radiused fretboard makes for smoother playing too but there are a number of luthiers who build with them these days.

mm stan
04-23-2012, 04:32 PM
Aloha Bruddah Eugene,
Ha Ha....I know you will never sell your mango Mya Moe...it is your holy grail and it got an unbelievable excellent sound....but you have played both my koa MM and your Mango MM sopranos..
yes just slight differences between the two...but I feel them...I guess every Mya Moe is made different or was it your mya Moe Mango made before Aaron guy started making necks for them.
could be the difference in the necks..just wondering, I guess since they are all made indvidually, you can specify really what you want and be percise...tell Ms M about your mango....she is thinking about getting one..she will be grateful..

Hippie Dribble
04-23-2012, 04:45 PM
hey mate, I think that one is just an anomaly...never played any other MM's like that koa one. It is a later model (411) than the mango (250) but not sure Aaron was working for them at that point...not officially anyway.

As far as customising your neck profile goes...you probably can although I know Gordon gets the blocks of mahogany in pre cut and shapes them all himself within pretty narrow peramaters so they are all very similar. I only know this because when I asked Gordon to build me a maple neck he hesitated for those above reasons...said he would do it but the wait time would be longer. Maybe Aaron can chime in here and let us know the process.

Yes Bruddah, I mentioned to M about my little mango soprano and I think she knows my feelings about it. :)

ryanvt
04-23-2012, 05:32 PM
I haven't really played any other high end ukes besides strumming a few in Hawaii when I was just starting. However compared to my Pono and all of the production ukes I've played, I would say the neck is the big difference as far as playability. As far as tone, sustain, and intonation my mya moe far surpasses everything I've played. That is saying something, because I also love my Pono...

I also really like the strings they supply with their ukes. They are much easier to play than koolau, Aquila, and Martin strings I have tried. In fact, I may try their strings on my other ukes to see if it makes a difference.

marymac
04-23-2012, 07:52 PM
Just going to chime in here to agree with Stan. The MM sycamore I have has a thicker neck than is comfortable for me. My two players right now are a Collings and a Kanilea Super Tenor and both have slimmer necks than the MM.

Hippie Dribble
04-23-2012, 11:09 PM
Just going to chime in here to agree with Stan. The MM sycamore I have has a thicker neck than is comfortable for me. My two players right now are a Collings and a Kanilea Super Tenor and both have slimmer necks than the MM.
I used to own that one Mary and I agree that neck is a little thicker too. That was one of the original 'blackstripe' series ukes when Aaron first started building with them and that particular neck is VERY much like one of his own beansprout ukes. The other two MM tenors I've owned both had very slim neck profiles...one a walnut tradition and the other a mango resonator. The neck on that reso was as slim as I've ever played on anything...I guess this does make you wonder though if they do have a standard neck profile or not...My bet is they do, and it's slim and comfortable enough for an overwhelming majority of backyarders like us and professional musicians to describe MM as being up there with the smoothest and most playable ukes on the planet.