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BIGDB
05-19-2012, 08:55 PM
I've just been wondering if I should just save my money for a mya moe and wait for the next build or just buy like a kanilea or g string or something. I here lots of good thing about mya moes and I'm wondering if there that much better cause the mya moe I would want would be around 2100 and the kanilea I would want is around 1500 so I'm wondering if it's worth it to wait for a mya moe.


Kinda a different subject but do maple mya moes sound good

And how the the curly koa kanileas sound

Those are the two im looking at

Please help

consitter
05-19-2012, 08:57 PM
PM mmstan. He has played/owned all of the above. He will give you wise and sage advice.

kapahulu50
05-19-2012, 09:18 PM
Check out the reviews section. Lots of good info there. I have a Kanile'a premium tenor and it sounds spectacular, incredibly clear and super long sustain.

Patrick Madsen
05-19-2012, 10:10 PM
I have a MM blue pond myrtle Tenor and really like it. I bought it pre-owned by 6 mos. so I didn't have a 7 month wait. The neck is unbelievable it is so smooth. I'm having a challenge getting used to the smaller body. It's a great choice. I like a little bigger body with a deeper more mellow tone and reach for my Griffin first. I may end up selling the MM eventually if I don't end up playing it more.

If you're considering a great custom, you may want to check out griffinukuleles.com. Brian is in the finishing stages of french polishing three tenors that are looking pretty good. I bought the Koa with the old growth {approx. 1600 yrs. old} cedar top with ebony binding. The photo of them are in his blog section.

There was a MM for sale in the Markerplace not too long ago. It was brand new, never used. http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?64123-FS-Mya-Moe-koa-tenor-classic

I don't feel you could go wrong with any of the brands you are thinking of. 7mos is a long time to wait, but it'll be custom made for you.

kvehe
05-20-2012, 12:07 AM
PM mmstan. He has played/owned all of the above. He will give you wise and sage advice.

...but right now mm Stan is having Internet connection issues, so he may not be available until next weekend. Otherwise, yes, he is a great resource.

chris667
05-20-2012, 12:17 AM
You're thinking about spending that much on instruments you don't know the sound of? Seriously?

Of course we're going to say they're great. You need to try one and then make the decision for yourself.

consitter
05-20-2012, 12:21 AM
Great point Chris. All the more reason he should wait and talk to mm Stan.

chris667
05-20-2012, 12:39 AM
Great point Chris. All the more reason he should wait and talk to mm Stan.

For such a large purchase, I don't think it's enough to just have an account of one. I hope what I've said doesn't come over as negative, but really getting advice is not enough. With something like that, you should try it; musical instruments are decidedly subjective.

foxfair
05-20-2012, 01:38 AM
What kind of sound do you want from a(or any) custom uke ? You'll need to figure it out before next new uke.

dkcrown
05-20-2012, 01:43 AM
I sent you a PM, BIGDB

Eyeguy
05-20-2012, 03:27 AM
As a long time guitar collector - both vintage and new - and now the owner of 2 ukes with a third having been sold, I can understand the "try it before buying it" sentiment. It makes perfect sense and for those who have access to a variety of the instruments they want to play, and I would avail myself of that opportunity without hesitation. However, for those of us who live in areas where the instruments we have an interest in are not to be found, that is not such a practical option. Let's say I want to try out a Mya-Moe walnut tenor cutaway or a Moore Bettah concert koa with cedar top, well, my chances of finding one of these to test drive in my neck of the woods is between slim and none, and none just left town, if you get my drift. Sure, ideally I'd like to simply cruise down to my neighborhood Mya-Moe or Moore Bettah outlet and try out 20 different varieties of each and then walk out with the one that flipped my switch, but that just isn't going to happen.

Second, the sound of new instruments varies from instrument to instrument, depending upon a lot of factors, not the least of which is that some identically made instruments just end up sounding better than others for no other reason than they just do . - go into a big music store and play 5 Martin tenor ukes - I guarantee some will sound better than the others and one will stand out above the rest. Meaning that if I am somehow fortunate enough to play Ukulele Bob's Mya-Moe mahogany concert and it sounds wonderful, there is absolutely no guarantee that the identical instrument I order from Mya-Moe will sound the same.

So, what's a poor schmo to do? Well, we read reviews, talk to folks who have owned the instruments we're interested in, watch YouTube videos featuring those instruments, and then pull the trigger on what we "perceive" is the one that will serve our interests and hope that it meets our expectations. When they don't, you find them listed in the Marketplace. Not an ideal system for buying a custom uke I grant you, but the only real option many of us have. In the final analysis, if you buy quality at a fair market price, you will at least improve your chances dramatically of recouping most of your investment if the instrument doesn't live up to expectations.

pulelehua
05-20-2012, 04:39 AM
For such a large purchase, I don't think it's enough to just have an account of one. I hope what I've said doesn't come over as negative, but really getting advice is not enough. With something like that, you should try it; musical instruments are decidedly subjective.

Know anyone in Derbyshire with a Mya Moe or a Kanilea? I don't. Know anyone in the UK with either? I don't.

My sister-in-law in California has a custom Kanilea super-tenor. So I could comment on one of those. It's really lovely. Very sweet sound. Big, but not boomy.

I bought a custom without ever being able to play one. It was a risk. I think sometimes you need to read, listen, then leap...

blue_knight_usa
05-20-2012, 05:41 AM
I just sent you a PM with some information for you check out.
Good luck!


I've just been wondering if I should just save my money for a mya moe and wait for the next build or just buy like a kanilea or g string or something. I here lots of good thing about mya moes and I'm wondering if there that much better cause the mya moe I would want would be around 2100 and the kanilea I would want is around 1500 so I'm wondering if it's worth it to wait for a mya moe.


Kinda a different subject but do maple mya moes sound good

And how the the curly koa kanileas sound

Those are the two im looking at

Please help

Lori
05-20-2012, 05:55 AM
I have a Kanile'a and a Mya-Moe. Both beautiful instruments. The neck of my concert Mya-Moe is probably the most comfortable to play (of all my ukes-and I have many) for some reason. Char and Gordon give you GREAT customer service. I play my Kanile'a quite a bit, and it is a joy to play and look at.

In general, maple wood would be a brighter sound (sparkly treble) than curly koa. Curly koa would probably have a stronger bottom end (stronger bass tones).

–Lori

Hiddencross
05-20-2012, 05:55 AM
Hey BIGDB,

I was in the same boat, saving for a Mya Moe, when I ran across some great bargains on the marketplace here. I am now the proud owner of a Kanile'a. I love it. My advice, save for the Mya Moe but keep your eyes and ears open to other possibilities.

Chris

chris667
05-20-2012, 05:56 AM
Know anyone in Derbyshire with a Mya Moe or a Kanilea? I don't. Know anyone in the UK with either? I don't.

My sister-in-law in California has a custom Kanilea super-tenor. So I could comment on one of those. It's really lovely. Very sweet sound. Big, but not boomy.

I bought a custom without ever being able to play one. It was a risk. I think sometimes you need to read, listen, then leap...

Well, it's your money. Personally, I'd feel pretty silly if I spent thousands on a uke I didn't like.

Your description of your sister-in-law's uke is yours. On hearing it, I would probably describe it differently. And we'd both be right.

stevepetergal
05-20-2012, 07:17 AM
I've owned all three "K"s and a Mya-Moe. I would save for the Mya-Moe. No question.

OldePhart
05-20-2012, 08:56 AM
No, you should not save for a Mya Moe - you should use your credit card and get on the list immediately. In these tough economic times Citibank, Chase, and Bank of America are counting on you - how can you even consider letting them down?!

(And, should there be any doubt, that was tonge-firmly-in-cheek!)

John

pulelehua
05-20-2012, 10:52 AM
Well, it's your money. Personally, I'd feel pretty silly if I spent thousands on a uke I didn't like.

Your description of your sister-in-law's uke is yours. On hearing it, I would probably describe it differently. And we'd both be right.

I suppose my point is: should you be limited by culture & geography? Should people in relatively ukulele-free zones not buy good/not-locally-available ukuleles?

AetherBlue
05-20-2012, 11:06 AM
I don't think you could go wrong with either. Are you patient? If not, go with Kanilea? My super tenor is my favorite, but I also have a Moe that's due in August. The majority of my instruments I have bought without playing them first because it was impossible to try them from my location, fortunately I haven't been disappointed with a purchase yet. Look up both brands on youtube and see what you'd prefer and read about them. It should give you an idea on what to expect. I know mya-moe's have a high resale value probably due to long wait-list. So, I'm sure you can sale it if you don't like it.

chris667
05-20-2012, 01:10 PM
I suppose my point is: should you be limited by culture & geography? Should people in relatively ukulele-free zones not buy good/not-locally-available ukuleles?

It's their money. But to my mind, putting up the cash for something you've never played is just crazy.

janeray1940
05-20-2012, 01:16 PM
It's their money. But to my mind, putting up the cash for something you've never played is just crazy.

Yes and no - I'm of the mind that one should always try before you buy, but I think ordering a custom is a different thing entirely. Rarely is it possible to try one before you buy it, but I don't see how you can go wrong if you order from a builder with a 100% money-back guarantee.

Would I buy a Dolphin sight unseen? Heck no; for that matter I wouldn't likely buy a Kamaka sight unseen again either. But even where I am, five minutes away from a shop with a great high end uke selection, there won't be the opportunity to try a Mya-Moe or any other custom builder. Once in a while those opportunities come up at uke festivals, but not so much at music shops.

jackwhale
05-20-2012, 01:45 PM
I would think the sound of any curly koa or maple instrument would be so different that the specific maker wouldn't be the differentiating factor. Our Thursday night uke 'band' has examples of both. However the Mya Moe is a maple resonator and the Kanilea is koa. Both ukes are fabulous players. I actually don't notice the radiused fingerboard as much as I thought I would. The K sings and barks on command. And the resonator has it's own wonderful and loud voice.

I have a Mya Moe baritone on order. It will arrive in early November- a long wait. Gordon and Char are VERY helpful and were able to translate my thoughts into very special wood selection. They make forking over 2K into a fun process.

Your decision is a difficult one. If you find yourself waking up repeatedly dreaming of one over the other, go with that uke. Otherwise its probably a coin toss.

Others on UU can provide more authoritative opinions.

Eyeguy
05-20-2012, 02:55 PM
chris667,

First off, I am genuinely not trying to be contentious here, just curious as to the rationale and logic of what your are saying. Everyone is the world's greatest authority on their own opinion - and I include myself in that group - I'm just trying to understand yours.

Question #1: Let's say I desire to own a Mya-Moe walnut cutaway tenor. There are zero Mya-Moe dealers anywhere near where I live, nor anyone on the forum or otherwise who live near me who has such an instrument. Are you suggesting I should not pursue this specific instrument because I am unable to test drive it ahead of time?

Question #2: Are you suggesting that it would be otherwise okay to purchase such a custom built walnut cutaway Mya-Moe tenor as long as I test drove "any" Mya-Moe tenor uke ahead of time, this despite the fact that it will undoubtedly sound different in that it will have different tonewoods from the one I order?

Question #3: Are you suggesting that no individual who lives out in the middle of nowhere and has no realistic access to high end custom built ukes should ever buy a custom uke from any builder unless they have the opportunity to play one ahead of time, but instead only purchase factory built instruments available in music stores that can be held and played prior to purchase?

Question #4: What is your personal monetary cutoff point above which purchases of ukes without prior in hand auditioning is considered "crazy", and how is that cutoff point determined?

Question #5: This one is just for fun. Someone calls to tell you that you have the opportunity to buy Jake Shimabukuro's personal Kamaka ukulele for $1500 but you have to act now. You comfortably have the money on hand but have never actually played a Kamaka, although you've seen Jake play this very ukulele on YouTube a number of times and even once in person at one of his concerts and find it's tone and projection outstanding to your ears. Do you pass on the opportunity because it would be "silly" to fund such an expensive uke purchase without having actually played one?

BIGDB, As to your original question, I believe most here have answered it the way I would as well, that being that I don't think you could go wrong either way in your decision. I sold a Kanile'a tenor that was simply outstanding to fund the purchase of a custom Mya-Moe tenor with a radiused fingerboard that I'm expecting to be outstanding as well. As my dad used to say, you get what you pay for and when you buy quality you hedge your bet significantly that you'll get a wonderful instrument, regardless of which way you go. Enjoy your decision making process, the hunt is half the fun.

chris667
05-20-2012, 11:12 PM
1. Why do you want to buy a walnut Mya Moe cutaway tenor? Because you like what other people have said about theirs? Or is it because they cost a lot of money, and you feel you deserve one? Is it because it's pretty, or that no-one you know has one?
2. No, because if I was prepared to buy something custom made, I'd know what I wanted beforehand, and I would talk to the builders and decide I liked them before stumping up the cash.
3. I think that's a reasonable statement. The uke scene is so friendly and inviting, it's a shame not to travel to meet other ukulele players. I don't know of anyone who sells high-end custom ukes near me, but last weekend I met three luthiers at a uke festival in Wales.
4. Crazy, for me, is more than the price of a night out. $2000 is a year's rent where I am at the minute.
5. Tricky one. I probably would provided I could get my money back if I didn't like it. You won't do that with a uke that's customised to you. I think it's safe to say owning Jake's uke wouldn't make me able to play music like him.

Of course, you may have a lot more money than me and be willing to take a gamble. But make no bones, it is a gamble.

chris667
05-20-2012, 11:19 PM
Yes and no - I'm of the mind that one should always try before you buy, but I think ordering a custom is a different thing entirely. Rarely is it possible to try one before you buy it, but I don't see how you can go wrong if you order from a builder with a 100% money-back guarantee.

Now, to be fair, I didn't know about this. This would remove a lot of the risk.

PedalFreak
05-21-2012, 04:27 AM
I've recently tried a LOT of Mya Moe's. I wouldnt buy one for what they cost. Played a mango, Koa, sycamore, & a few other combinations (all tenors).

From my experience, I'd say go with the kanilea. If you want any details send me a PM :)

BIGDB
05-21-2012, 07:26 AM
1. Why do you want to buy a walnut Mya Moe cutaway tenor? Because you like what other people have said about theirs? Or is it because they cost a lot of money, and you feel you deserve one? Is it because it's pretty, or that no-one you know has one?
2. No, because if I was prepared to buy something custom made, I'd know what I wanted beforehand, and I would talk to the builders and decide I liked them before stumping up the cash.
3. I think that's a reasonable statement. The uke scene is so friendly and inviting, it's a shame not to travel to meet other ukulele players. I don't know of anyone who sells high-end custom ukes near me, but last weekend I met three luthiers at a uke festival in Wales.
4. Crazy, for me, is more than the price of a night out. $2000 is a year's rent where I am at the minute.
5. Tricky one. I probably would provided I could get my money back if I didn't like it. You won't do that with a uke that's customised to you. I think it's safe to say owning Jake's uke wouldn't make me able to play music like him.

Of course, you may have a lot more money than me and be willing to take a gamble. But make no bones, it is a gamble.
The reason I want a maple cutaway Is cause my favorite player is James hill and I really like the sound of his

BIGDB
05-21-2012, 07:30 AM
Thanks for all the advice but I will probably just get a kanilea cause I think 2100 is just to much for me

Lori
05-21-2012, 07:47 AM
The reason I want a maple cutaway Is cause my favorite player is James hill and I really like the sound of his

Mike DaSilva (Berkeley California) made the one you are talking about for James Hill. ukemaker.com
http://ukemaker.com/images/UkeGallery/229-JHTenor-1024.jpg
–Lori

Mandarb
05-21-2012, 07:54 AM
Thanks for all the advice but I will probably just get a kanilea cause I think 2100 is just to much for me

It all comes down to personnel preference and what a person can comfortably afford. I look foward to pics of your new uke.

Raygf
05-21-2012, 08:47 AM
Mike DaSilva (Berkeley California) made the one you are talking about for James Hill. ukemaker.com
http://ukemaker.com/images/UkeGallery/229-JHTenor-1024.jpg
–Lori

The James Hill DaSilva (http://www.ukemaker.com/images/UkeGallery/171-TMCustom-1024.jpg) tenors are spruce top, curly koa back and sides. I could not find a maple cutaway on the DaSilva page.
Here are 4 Mya-Moe (http://www.myamoeukuleles.com/artistDetails.php?id=2) Ukuleles that he owns and plays.
And of course he's played G-String (http://ukulelehunt.com/buy-ukulele/brands/g-string-ukulele/) signature model ukuleles for a long time.

Eyeguy
05-21-2012, 03:06 PM
hris667,

I think you answered all of my questions, in spades I might add. I am sorry about your financial situation, but those of us who have worked hard all of our lives and put ourselves in a position to drop a grand or two on a custom ukulele offer no apologies for our choices on where or how to spend our discretionary income. Second, it doesn't really matter what the reasons are for my choice of uke or even if I can play the "pretty" thing, and shouldn't be any of yours, any more than it is any of my business where or how you choose to spend a "night out", the difference being that in my world, I welcome and applaud the relative successes of other achievers rather than denigrating them.

I'm not sure how long you've been a resident on this fair planet, but I can tell you from experience that besides death and taxes, there are no sure things in life, and some measure of risk cannot be legislated, pre-planned, or otherwise wished out of any equation where humans are involved.

So you can play all the ukes you want and talk to all the builders you desire and you will never ever guarantee that the finished product you end up with in your hands is going to be the precise material manifestation of what you have conjured up in your mind's eye and ear. Building musical instruments has never been and is not now an exact science, which in the final analysis is ostensibly what makes getting a custom built instrument so darned cool in the first place - you never know exactly what you're going to get. And yes, that means that sometimes our expectations and the final result don't jibe perfectly and we may end up selling it and maybe even, God forbid, losing a bit of money in the process, but that's life and the alternative is sitting on the sidelines holding fast to our precious funds for fear that we might somehow be disappointed in the choices we opt for and as a result end up not making any at all.

So yes, be smart and certainly exercise due diligence in deciding what qualities you desire in a fine ukulele so that when the moment of truth arrives and you're ready to pull the trigger you can at least feel comfortable knowing you entered into the process with your eyes wide open. Until then, why not lighten up a little bit and at least attempt to happy for those who through their own sweat and toil may be more fortunate than yourself, and maybe someday even find it in yourself to take a little walk on the wild side yourself. Life is much too short, and despite the inescapable risks, the rewards can be genuinely outstanding.

Here's wishing all the best to you and I sincerely hope I'm reading a thread one of these days about you acquiring the uke of your dreams. After all, just like me or anybody else on this forum, if you're willing to work for what you want, you too deserve to compensate yourself for the fruits of your labor however you see fit.

Now, back to your regularly scheduled thread;)

BIGDB, The Kanile'a is a great choice - can't go very wrong there at all. Go for it.

KimUke
05-21-2012, 03:24 PM
Wow, Eyeguy....I think I love you!

Tack
05-21-2012, 03:41 PM
Wow, Eyeguy....I think I love you!

:agree: :agree:

BIGDB
05-21-2012, 07:49 PM
Mike DaSilva (Berkeley California) made the one you are talking about for James Hill. ukemaker.com
http://ukemaker.com/images/UkeGallery/229-JHTenor-1024.jpg
–Lori
I'm talking about his g string that is tuned high g

chris667
05-21-2012, 10:59 PM
hris667,

I think you answered all of my questions, in spades I might add. I am sorry about your financial situation, but those of us who have worked hard all of our lives and put ourselves in a position to drop a grand or two on a custom ukulele offer no apologies for our choices on where or how to spend our discretionary income.

Eyeguy, have I offended you?

Far be it from me to tell anyone what they spend their money on. If you want a Mya-Moe, by all means have one. There is no-one you have to justify it to, apart from perhaps a spouse or a credit card company.

All I'm trying to say is if you're considering buying something purely from what you've seen/read on the internet, that's a very poor second to trying it out.

It's enough for me to have two ukes which I play every day which I really like. I don't find myself coveting the next one, or spending all day looking at ukuleles. If I see another uke I like more, I will buy it and my Bruko or Blue Moon will go. Or maybe I'll just have three ukes. I'm an aspiring player, not an aspiring collector.

The one thing I would ask, though, is what makes you think I have no money because I live in a frugal way? I moved onto a boat because I love it, not because I was forced to. Pretty much everyone could buy a custom uke if they wanted one; it isn't like buying a yacht or a Ferrari. You know the saying - "To assume makes an ass of u and me". :D

AetherBlue
05-21-2012, 11:38 PM
5. Tricky one. I probably would provided I could get my money back if I didn't like it. You won't do that with a uke that's customised to you. I think it's safe to say owning Jake's uke wouldn't make me able to play music like him.

Of course, you may have a lot more money than me and be willing to take a gamble. But make no bones, it is a gamble.


A tricky one? O_o; You realize you could resale Jake's uke for many times that amount?

chris667
05-21-2012, 11:42 PM
A tricky one? O_o; You realize you could resale Jake's uke for many times that amount?

I don't know! I've never bought a uke to sell afterwards.

OK, I'd take their hand off. :p

Actually, I wouldn't. It wouldn't make me play like him. Hobbies and work are different.

JeremyR
05-22-2012, 10:52 AM
hris667,

I think you answered all of my questions, in spades I might add. I am sorry about your financial situation, but those of us who have worked hard all of our lives and put ourselves in a position to drop a grand or two on a custom ukulele offer no apologies for our choices on where or how to spend our discretionary income. Second, it doesn't really matter what the reasons are for my choice of uke or even if I can play the "pretty" thing, and shouldn't be any of yours, any more than it is any of my business where or how you choose to spend a "night out", the difference being that in my world, I welcome and applaud the relative successes of other achievers rather than denigrating them.



This sort of debate has raged on for years on the guitar bulletin boards, where the boutique instrument market is much more established. There will always be people who believe that boutique instruments made out of exotic materials are just luxury toys for high income earners with minimal talent (and I'm not suggesting the person to whom you were responding is of that mindset), and an equal number of people who think that the middle and upper class should be able to indulge in top-of-the-line gear without judgment from their peers. I can tell you from experience that there will never be consensus on this issue. If there was, what would musicians argue about on the internet?

consitter
05-22-2012, 12:34 PM
This sort of debate has raged on for years on the guitar bulletin boards, where the boutique instrument market is much more established. There will always be people who believe that boutique instruments made out of exotic materials are just luxury toys for high income earners with minimal talent (and I'm not suggesting the person to whom you were responding is of that mindset), and an equal number of people who think that the middle and upper class should be able to indulge in top-of-the-line gear without judgment from their peers. I can tell you from experience that there will never be consensus on this issue. If there was, what would musicians argue about on the internet?

Wow. That just put this whole thread in a nutshell.

OldePhart
05-22-2012, 12:40 PM
...I can tell you from experience that there will never be consensus on this issue. If there was, what would musicians argue about on the internet?

Heh, heh. Reminds me of the cartoon with a guy sitting in front of his computer typing away furiously. His wife is trying to get him to come to bed and he's telling her - "just a minute, somebody on the internet is wrong!" :)

John

Eyeguy
05-23-2012, 04:30 PM
chris667,

No personal offense taken, as I have to grant you permission to truly do that, but I will say that

[QUOTE]1. Why do you want to buy a walnut Mya Moe cutaway tenor? Because you like what other people have said about theirs? Or is it because they cost a lot of money, and you feel you deserve one? Is it because it's pretty, or that no-one you know has one?/QUOTE]

tweaked my sensibilities a tad. I or anyone else who has the discretionary income available to buy a custom/high dollar uke, is absolutely entitled to make that decision based on whatever criteria he or she chooses, whether it be a pretty headstock logo or simply the cool design of the wood grain. The fact that you personally believe otherwise is certainly your prerogative and may in fact represent a genuinely valid and logical position, but does not in any way render someone else's alternative position invalid, crazy, or silly, at least in the arena of personal consumer spending anyway, which is what we're talking about here. By way of full disclosure, I haven't completely decided which custom uke to purchase - my example was just a hypothetical - but can tell you I've contacted a half dozen custom uke builders, including the fine folks at Mya-Moe, twice that many more private owners of custom ukes, and probably viewed over 30 videos of various ukes in all manner of tone woods and styles. Still, while I am personally an avid researcher prior to purchase, I don't have any problem with anyone choosing to lay down some serious cash for a custom uke for any reason whatsoever, logical or not. Their funds, their choice of how to spend it.

Regarding my assumption of your financial status, I must say that $166 per month rent would certainly seem to qualify one living in an industrialized country as being as relatively impoverished, until, that is, you subsequently filled in the missing information on your floating housing arrangements. Still, despite what your description may have suggested, such circumstantial evidence is no substitute for confirmed facts, and I hope you will accept my apology for making that assumption without the requisite fact checking.

By the way, have you considered acquiring a Boat Paddle uke? :)

Jeremy,

I have hung out at the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum for the last 8 or 9 years, and must admit that during that time the closest thing to a disparaging comment I have ever heard someone voice to an amateur purchaser's choice of GAS fulfillment is "Hey, cool guitar, but where are the pics?" , but never, "Hey, can you actually play that thing?" On the contrary, most of us are rampant enablers who encourage just such acquisitions so that we can drool over instruments that may be out of our own financial reach. Oh, we argue alright, but usually over the superiority of Martins to Gibsons or the relative tonal attributes of fossilized ivory saddles over bone and other such arcane stuff. You know, my father used to advise me to buy the very best equipment I could afford at a fair market price - taking heed not to put myself or my family's financial needs in harm's way in the process - and not to wait for some real or imagined attainment of expertise before opting for the good stuff. Learning any new skill is hard enough, he would say, and trying to grow a budding skill set with crappy equipment makes the process an exercise in frustration that often renders the achievement of any reasonable level of expertise a lot harder than it needs to be. So, the suggestion that folks shouldn't be buying custom made golf clubs until they are scratch golfers or that aspiring cyclists have no business purchasing carbon fiber frames and carbon clincher wheels until they can hang with Lance Armstrong is quite frankly a philosophy I simply personally don't adhere to. I say, when it comes to deciding how to part with one's hard earned money, to each their own, Lord knows theres a whole lot worse stuff in this world folks squander their dough on. Again, only my opinion, but kinda the crux of this back and forth we've had going on here.

BIGDB, My sincere apologies for being the party primarily responsible for diverting your thread off on a tangent. I hope you were able to glean the information you needed despite my ramblings. And please keep us informed of your eventual purchase - with pics of course ;)

chris667
05-23-2012, 10:33 PM
chris667,

No personal offense taken, as I have to grant you permission to truly do that, but I will say that

[QUOTE]1. Why do you want to buy a walnut Mya Moe cutaway tenor? Because you like what other people have said about theirs? Or is it because they cost a lot of money, and you feel you deserve one? Is it because it's pretty, or that no-one you know has one?/QUOTE]

tweaked my sensibilities a tad.

Eyeguy, I genuinely didn't mean to cause offence, or to come across as judgemental. It's just such a shame, to my mind, to not get into the scene and go and meet people and talk about ukes. I do admire custom instruments; in Wales I saw Rob Collin's Tenor (www.tinguitar.com) and it was very possibly the most beautiful uke I've ever seen. I'm going to be meeting him again next week, and I have to say I am tempted.


By the way, have you considered acquiring a Boat Paddle uke? :)


No, but I do occasionally use my uke as a paddle.

JeremyR
05-24-2012, 09:12 AM
chris667,

Jeremy,

I have hung out at the Unofficial Martin Guitar Forum for the last 8 or 9 years, and must admit that during that time the closest thing to a disparaging comment I have ever heard someone voice to an amateur purchaser's choice of GAS fulfillment is "Hey, cool guitar, but where are the pics?" , but never, "Hey, can you actually play that thing?" On the contrary, most of us are rampant enablers who encourage just such acquisitions so that we can drool over instruments that may be out of our own financial reach. Oh, we argue alright, but usually over the superiority of Martins to Gibsons or the relative tonal attributes of fossilized ivory saddles over bone and other such arcane stuff. You know, my father used to advise me to buy the very best equipment I could afford at a fair market price - taking heed not to put myself or my family's financial needs in harm's way in the process - and not to wait for some real or imagined attainment of expertise before opting for the good stuff. Learning any new skill is hard enough, he would say, and trying to grow a budding skill set with crappy equipment makes the process an exercise in frustration that often renders the achievement of any reasonable level of expertise a lot harder than it needs to be. So, the suggestion that folks shouldn't be buying custom made golf clubs until they are scratch golfers or that aspiring cyclists have no business purchasing carbon fiber frames and carbon clincher wheels until they can hang with Lance Armstrong is quite frankly a philosophy I simply personally don't adhere to. I say, when it comes to deciding how to part with one's hard earned money, to each their own, Lord knows theres a whole lot worse stuff in this world folks squander their dough on. Again, only my opinion, but kinda the crux of this back and forth we've had going on here.



Yeah, I'm not one to argue with that. The forum I was referring to is The Gear Page (primarily and electric guitar and amp group), where you can see quite a lot of the "yeah but can you play it?" mentality on display. Maybe not in response to specific purchases, but more along the lines of general threads casting aspersions at those who are collector/hobbyist types with a lot of money to spend.

RichM
05-24-2012, 09:59 AM
Here's the thing that makes me smile about this thread:

Over the years, I've owned hundreds of instruments. Some I've kept, most I've sold. I've enjoyed them all. When I sell, sometimes I get back what I paid, sometimes I lose a few bucks, sometimes I lose big. On a few rare occasions, I've actually gotten back more than I paid. But the bottom line is, I got enormous pleasure from the instrument while I had it.

Everybody should enjoy the pastime of their choosing. I've never known anyone to get a dime back from a lift ticket or greens fees. I've never known anybody to get their money back on a fine cigar or an expensive bottle of scotch (unless, of course, they didn't smoke or drink them, in which case, they didn't enjoy them).

Instruments can be bought, enjoyed immensely, kept for a lifetime if that's what makes sense, or passed on to others to enjoy.

The notion that spending a lot of money on an instrument is a crazy indulgence has never resonated with me. Music is as necessary to my life as water or oxygen. I'll never make apologies for wanting to make music on wonderful instruments. I don't smoke, I don't drink, and I don't gamble (much). This is my one vice, and it's a wonderful one. And if I ever find myself destitute, I'll sell them. Beautiful instruments turn to cash much easier than awful ones.

Live life. Play what you want to play. Ink what you want to ink (see other contentious thread). Never apologize for decisions you make that create happiness for you and cause no damage to others.

Eyeguy
05-24-2012, 02:46 PM
RichM,

Amen! As a buyer and seller of over 60 guitars in the last 10 years, I too am a charter member of the Catch and Release Club, and openly profess that for me, both the hunt for and acquisition of cool new instruments is almost as much fun as learning to play them. The truly great ones with special heart and character remain fixed in my stable, but all contribute in their own way to the experience of learning to appreciate the unique personalities and attributes of each individual instrument. I am already finding the same joy and passion being evoked through the acquisition of ukuleles, and look forward to filling yet more of my wife's closet spaces with little cases ;) Ah, too little time, too many ukes - I've got to pick up the pace.

Canoe Lady
05-24-2012, 07:34 PM
Everybody should enjoy the pastime of their choosing. I've never known anyone to get a dime back from a lift ticket or greens fees. I've never known anybody to get their money back on a fine cigar or an expensive bottle of scotch (unless, of course, they didn't smoke or drink them, in which case, they didn't enjoy them).

Instruments can be bought, enjoyed immensely, kept for a lifetime if that's what makes sense, or passed on to others to enjoy.

The notion that spending a lot of money on an instrument is a crazy indulgence has never resonated with me. Music is as necessary to my life as water or oxygen. I'll never make apologies for wanting to make music on wonderful instruments. I don't smoke, I don't drink, and I don't gamble (much). This is my one vice, and it's a wonderful one. And if I ever find myself destitute, I'll sell them. Beautiful instruments turn to cash much easier than awful ones.

Live life. Play what you want to play. Ink what you want to ink (see other contentious thread). Never apologize for decisions you make that create happiness for you and cause no damage to others.

Well said. :rock:

southcoastukes
05-24-2012, 07:55 PM
I just decided to read this thread when I saw how long it was running. Figured something must be going on.

First, I am no authority on Mya Moe. I played a few at the Dallas Fest - in a very brief encounter, they seemed nice.

I agree with both chris & Rich - excellent points from the two of them. The one thing I didn't see mentioned is that there are lots of folks who offer a trial period. With us it's 10 days. If it doesn't suit you, our policy is you pay return freight only. A lot of others do something similar.

I think looking for that sort of arrangement takes care of the "try before you buy". If, like most, you live in an ukulele poor zone, return freight for delivery of a high end instrument to your home for a "free trial" seems reasonable.

coolkayaker1
05-24-2012, 08:03 PM
I just decided to read this thread when I saw how long it was running. Figured something must be going on.

I was wrong.

mds725
05-24-2012, 08:54 PM
I just decided to read this thread when I saw how long it was running. Figured something must be going on.

I was wrong.

I hope you didn't read it while you were driving. :)

kvehe
05-24-2012, 11:51 PM
I hope you didn't read it while you were driving. :)

Hah hah! My first good laugh of the day! Thank you!